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Old 01-07-2016, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Austin
11,133 posts, read 6,325,737 times
Reputation: 12091

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It is reported a woman was fired from her job for making a twitter post about a another patron of a restaurant who became ill on New Year's Eve.

Hairdresser who posted a rant about a diner ruining her New Year's Eve meal by having a heart attack is FIRED from her job
Holly Jones went online to slam staff at Kilroy's Bar N' Grill in Indianapolis
She was angry waiters went to the woman's aid instead of serving her
She believed the sick woman was a 'junkie' having an overdose
However, she was a 57-year-old customer who fell ill during a meal
Manager Chris Burton said Jones's behavior was 'disgusting'
He told Daily Mail Online someone from her party called to apologize
Jones has been fired from her job at Serenity Salon as a hair stylist



Read more: Hairdresser who posted a rant about a diner ruining her NYE meal is fired | Daily Mail Online
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Do you think being fired was an appropriate response to the twitter post? How far back, years, days, should a social media post be considered worthy of being fired? 5 years ago for instance?

It seems people are often being reported in the press as fired for posting to social media.

Are posters dumb to the consequences?

Why do people post controversial things to social media....things that could come back and haunt them? I am truly clueless.

 
Old 01-07-2016, 04:20 PM
 
35,121 posts, read 38,220,183 times
Reputation: 61863
Her reaction to an ill patron does not shine a good light on her employer and the employer did what they felt was in the best interest of their company, other employees and customers. Social media is the downfall of many employees and until they learn to use it responsibly or not at all they choose any consequences of their words/actions that they voluntarily post.
 
Old 01-07-2016, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Austin
11,133 posts, read 6,325,737 times
Reputation: 12091
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
Her reaction to an ill patron does not shine a good light on her employer and the employer did what they felt was in the best interest of their company, other employees and customers. Social media is the downfall of many employees and until they learn to use it responsibly or not at all they choose any consequences of their words/actions that they voluntarily post.
I used this news story as an example only. My questions are regarding posting on the social media in general.

I'm trying to understand if some people do not understand the potential consequences, csd? And if they do, do they ever wonder if something written in 2016 on social media will be forever on the web and could have consequences in 2026?

Writing an inconsiderate post about another person or even something politically correct and 'socially acceptable' may not be PC and 'socially acceptable' in 10 years.
 
Old 01-07-2016, 04:33 PM
 
35,121 posts, read 38,220,183 times
Reputation: 61863
Quote:
Originally Posted by texan2yankee View Post
I'm trying to understand if some people do not understand the potential consequences, csd? And if they do, do they ever wonder if something written forever on the web in social media in 2016 could have consequences in 2026?

Writing an inconsiderate post about another or even something considered politically correct and 'socially acceptable' may not be in 10 years.
Honestly I would not waste time worrying with trying to understand humans, their actions or thought processes. I'm also sure that I could go back through the many, many post I have made on this site and cringe and want to erase things while wondering what made me write the words I did at that moment in time.
To answer your question, no, they never wonder what the future consequence could be, hence the reason men and women still send naked photos of themselves and make sex tapes.
 
Old 01-07-2016, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Secure, Undisclosed
1,975 posts, read 1,212,845 times
Reputation: 3667
Quote:
Originally Posted by texan2yankee View Post
...Why do people post controversial things to social media....things that could come back and haunt them? I am truly clueless.
The laws of mathematics are immutable. The definition of 'average' on the IQ scale in western society is 100. One half of the population has an IQ at or above 100. Mathematically, that means that an equal number have an IQ of at or below 100.

And they all seem to text, tweet, facebook...etc...etc...etc...
 
Old 01-07-2016, 04:40 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 45,473,231 times
Reputation: 45848
Almost every kind of business is one of relationships, depending on the goodwill of customers. Like it or not, if you're in a service business, your behavior outside the workplace still reflects on your employer. This is especially true in some place like a hair salon that depends on loyalty from customers.

A good rule of thumb? If you wouldn't want your mother, your mother-in-law, your employer, or whatever else to read it, then DON'T TYPE IT. I just don't understand why this is so hard to figure out.

So, if one of my employees did that, I'd fire them in a heartbeat. In truth, she just revealed her true character.
 
Old 01-07-2016, 04:42 PM
 
5,267 posts, read 707,605 times
Reputation: 13715
I think I would say No (I might change my mind about this) unless:

1. The person who made such a tasteless post was an employee of the establishment that was the site of the scene that caused her or him to rant (for example, if a waiter at XYZ Restaurant wrote a rant about the disgusting dining manners a certain ethnic group had); OR

2. The person had a job in which public/customer relations were a big part of it; OR

3. The ranting employee worked with the same kind of person that she or he was ranting about. (For example, if the person posted a racist rant about blacks and s/he worked with blacks.)

And, btw, I think this hairstylist is another example of a selfish and self-centered BRAT.

Last edited by katharsis; 01-07-2016 at 05:41 PM..
 
Old 01-07-2016, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Austin
11,133 posts, read 6,325,737 times
Reputation: 12091
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpg35223 View Post
Almost every kind of business is one of relationships, depending on the goodwill of customers. Like it or not, if you're in a service business, your behavior outside the workplace still reflects on your employer. This is especially true in some place like a hair salon that depends on loyalty from customers.

A good rule of thumb? If you wouldn't want your mother, your mother-in-law, your employer, or whatever else to read it, then DON'T TYPE IT. I just don't understand why this is so hard to figure out.
I agree, however, what is the statute of limitations for want of a better term for inappropriate behavior that "reflects on an employer"? I mean some people are twittering and facebooking from an early age.
 
Old 01-07-2016, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Suburb of Chicago
17,983 posts, read 8,789,007 times
Reputation: 18439
For years, schools and parents have been warning those coming up that there is a risk involved in posting on Facebook. People looking for jobs, those who are employed, people with children, all risk losing what they have based on what they may be posting.

Right or wrong, once you decide to make your activities and opinions public, they become fair game. Anyone who lacks this type of common sense isn't someone I would want working for me.

In this specific case, she went on a rant about someone she said passed out due to drugs, and was whining that her party spent $700 and wasn't getting enough attention at the restaurant, adding that she guessed someone with a drug problem is more important than those still spending money in that establishment. The partner of the restaurant replied that it was a 70 year old woman suffering a heart attack and he was happy to hear the whiner wouldn't be returning because she made one of the waitresses cry and isn't the type of patron they want. He got a lot of replies backing him.

Should she have been fired for this? I'm guessing this special snowflake was just as whiny and demanding at work, and this was just the final straw.
 
Old 01-07-2016, 05:30 PM
 
Location: in here, out there
3,065 posts, read 5,330,876 times
Reputation: 5109
Cool Should she lose her job?

Absolutely. If you like your job, keep your mouth shut.
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