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Old 09-28-2018, 03:32 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
16,640 posts, read 20,310,169 times
Reputation: 22735

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A business owner in North Carolina complains, 50% of the applicants can't pass the drug test. I met an owner of a heavy equipment company here in Tucson: Ditto! Can't find any "qualified" workers. I won't hire anyone that doesn't pass the drug test.

And what may be other obstacles hindering applicants from being hired?

A man drinks up a storm before work the next day, and once he gets there, he's in no great shape to make his employer happy, but he passed the drug test! He's a qualified worker!

Here, in Tucson, a huge 55+ condo development, with 90% of the units pre-purchased, was scrapped, can't find workers, can't promise the buyers when the development will be finished or built. And with the Mexican population of Tucson at 40-45%?

Does any of it sound a little fishy to you, a worker shortage?
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Old 09-28-2018, 04:29 AM
 
7,001 posts, read 3,855,797 times
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In the blue collar jobs, yes there is a shortage of workers that are drug free, eager to work, not covered in tattoos and dependable. Then finding someone to do skilled work with actual skill is another challenge.

I am a manager for a small 15 person plumbing company. I can find “helpers” but skilled plumbers are elusive. Which is why plumbers are now making $50 an hour. The good ones have jobs. The bad ones float around to every company just collecting a paycheck. We have tried training, but you either have it or you don’t.
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Old 09-28-2018, 05:48 AM
 
Location: North Texas
45 posts, read 14,602 times
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For qualified people in positions requiring technical or other training, yes. The shortage is real, it is extreme, and in some ways frightening. I wonder if we have enough qualified engineers/scientists to continue as a world leader, and I sometimes worry if we can even maintain our current complex first world lifestyle (US-centered view, sorry).

I work for a large engineering firm developing autonomous vehicle software and control systems. My immediate group has 20 openings. Corporate-wide, we have somewhere between 600 and 800 openings (depending on when you ask). The minimum requirements for non-entry level engineering positions are very high. HR has a "bounty" offer if we can bring in qualified people. I'm in my sixties and still get calls/emails from headhunters. If I were younger and had a LinkedIn account, I suspect my inbox would be overloaded.

My son is an airline pilot and the shortage there is critical as well. Like me, he rarely goes a month without calls from headhunter/talent scouts. He was hired the instant he reached the minimum qualifications (at age 23), and was in the Captain's seat by age 26. In the past, upgrading to the left seat was a process measured in decades. Now with all the retirees flowing out the other end of the "pipeline", movement is swift.

For some reason that still baffles me, college students aren't majoring in the degrees that have critical shortages. My company has started identifying likely engineering candidates in high school, and trying to mentor and coach them thru STEM degrees in hopes they'll come to work for us later. They're very aware of the shortages, and are planning 8-10 years into the future.




As mentioned above, finding people who are drug-free, trained(able), no record and/or eligible for a security clearance, and who don't look like they fell face first into a tacklebox is a challenge. The good news is, for those who meet the qualifications -- The future's so bright, they gotta wear shades.
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Old 09-28-2018, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
492 posts, read 135,833 times
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It's a combination of workers not wanting to do certain jobs or obtain the necessary education or training for those jobs, and employers who set job requirements beyond and/or pay beneath what the local pool of candidates can support/provide.
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Old 09-28-2018, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,561 posts, read 24,497,965 times
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There is no worker shortage. There is a shortage of employers will to pay a fair wage with benefits. Substandard pay attracts substandard workers.
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Old 09-28-2018, 02:40 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
27,116 posts, read 58,884,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
A business owner in North Carolina complains, 50% of the applicants can't pass the drug test.
I met an owner of a heavy equipment company here in Tucson: Ditto! Can't find any "qualified" workers.
I won't hire anyone that doesn't pass the drug test.

Does any of it sound a little fishy to you, a worker shortage?
Not really. Even if only half of those passed over for drug tests can actually do the jobs.
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Old 09-28-2018, 02:52 PM
KCZ
 
1,602 posts, read 822,862 times
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As a homeowner, it's increasingly difficult to find a landscaper, contractor, handyman, repairman (appliances, electronics, vacuum cleaners), excavator, IT support person, housekeeper, the list goes on. People don't want to do these jobs anymore. It's going to make things increasingly difficult for an aging population who need help maintaining their homes.
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Old 09-28-2018, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Denver CO
492 posts, read 135,833 times
Reputation: 1261
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
There is no worker shortage. There is a shortage of employers will to pay a fair wage with benefits. Substandard pay attracts substandard workers.
No, there is also a shortage of workers who want to get into certain fields for one reason or another, or who want to adapt to a changing labor market.

And there is no such thing as a "fair" wage other than one the market determines a particular form of labor is worth (i.e. how difficult it is to find laborers to perform that labor).
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Old 09-28-2018, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,415 posts, read 10,213,255 times
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Statistics show that national (and state) unemployment levels are as low as they have been in 20-years at all ages. Higher unemployment rates exist among younger workers (16-19) and progressively drop by age from there. This suggests that the available jobs are pretty well balanced against the available workforce. Seasonally adjusted employment levels also match this trend. https://www.bls.gov/home.htm

While most of us have anecdotal stories about a job/worker shortage in particularly locations or fields, the measurable statistics are what they are. (Even if one takes issue with the source or method of statistic gathering, as long as the source and methods are consistent year after year, the trend is reliable).
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Old 09-28-2018, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
16,640 posts, read 20,310,169 times
Reputation: 22735
Quote:
Originally Posted by KCZ View Post
As a homeowner, it's increasingly difficult to find a landscaper, contractor, handyman, repairman (appliances, electronics, vacuum cleaners), excavator, IT support person, housekeeper, the list goes on. People don't want to do these jobs anymore. It's going to make things increasingly difficult for an aging population who need help maintaining their homes.
it's a very scary scenario at least for those in the hotter regions of this country. What I went thru this summer, with 110 degree heat, trying to get someone to fix my A/C properly, and the repairmen telling me how difficult it is to find a helper. With some A/C's now in the attics of houses, who wants to climb up into an attic, with indoor temp's of 130-140 degrees, to fix an A/C unit? I had to spend a week in a motel waiting for it be fixed, and my Real Estate agent waited 8 days to get hers fixed, properly. So this calls for being proactive. I'm now looking to dispense with my HVAC, and Heater, and buy these energy-saving, Ductfree Mini-splits which so many buyers are raving about.

At 68YO I'm not too worried about the shortage of auto mechanics, again being proactive, I bought a place where I'm 2 blocks to 2 big grocery stores, and 2 bus routes, and 2 blocks to a medical center. And I have a bike with a big basket, and I run over to Fry's with my bike occasionally. So if the car fails, big deal!

I ordered some replacement windows from Lowe's 5 weeks ago, and the estimator told me the Installer should be by in a few days, and I was patient, thinking of the labor shortage, and the installer finally called today for an appt. for next week. Patience run out, I ordered a couple windows which I'm going to try and install myself.

God forbid another Black Plague should come along and wipe out even a tenth of our population!
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