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Old 12-17-2018, 11:03 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rugrats2001 View Post
If the society within a country DOESN’T segregate races or culture, either voluntarily or forced, then it is neither multi-racial or multi-cultural. It is simply mixed.

If mates were chosen in the USA by lots, in 3 or 4 generations there would be no discernible ‘races’.
A mixed society I have no problems with that at all.
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Old 12-17-2018, 01:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
You need to think more deeply about what you posted. The fact that we have a particular percentage of non-white people doesn't mean race relations are positive.
This is true to some extent. Consider the Deep South. The Deep South has always had a large non-White population. Race relations have historically been bad in the region. While things have improved, there are still some problems.
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Old 12-18-2018, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,244 posts, read 7,230,276 times
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It will work until it blows up, or crashes and burns. Eventually, it will fail.
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Old 12-18-2018, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
28,540 posts, read 43,929,449 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2ner View Post
I have to disagree. While, yes, *hybridization* sounds like you're breeding cattle, inter-marriage does indeed help integrate people... something I read about reducing what they call *social distance*. I am NOT advocating mixed marriages. They are more likely to end in divorce. Voluntary/involuntary... I know a lot of married guys who feel like they have a ball chained to their ankles. If they divorce, the missus gets everything. A lot of millennial men are foregoing marriage altogether because they perceive the cards are stacked against them. A lot of millennial women remain single also or turn to Lesbianism.
So much wrong with this. For one thing, women contribute just as much (if not more) to household incomes these days - while you make it sound like we're still in the "olden days," when the man earned 100% of the income and the woman just spent it. And many states, like my own, have no-fault divorces; meaning everything is divided equally regardless of who earned what, unless pre-nups state otherwise. Speaking of which, if these millennials are so worried about divorce, they could hire an attorney and draw up the papers beforehand. Finally, nobody can "turn to lesbianism" unless they were already gay or bi. It's not like deciding to go vegan, for goodness sakes.

None of that is really related to the OP's topic, though; and I'm not even sure where you were attempting to go with it. But I had to respond, since it all made me shake my head.
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Old 12-19-2018, 09:00 AM
 
2,859 posts, read 1,286,858 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
I am currently reading Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation by Joseph J. Ellis. The book concerns the Revolutionary and early national era, focusing on Ben Franklin, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and others. Much of the book is still relevant. Among the many good points he makes is that the world, up until that time, had never really known a bi-racial (or multi-racial) society. Many people were advocating emancipation of the slaves. One of the reasons that was never seriously considered by Congress was that no would could comprehend a society where the races were mixed.

The United States was the first such society and I would argue still is the only truly integrated country. It is messy, but it works. The "Great Debate" topic is whether the difficulties in creating such a society engender many of the modern-day tensions over race, immigration and social benefits. The discussion on the latter is playing out in various threads, including Why Many "Conservatives" or Republicans Often Oppose Welfare. I believe we do a pretty good job of integrating, and shouldn't breast-beat ourselves that we're not perfect.


I agree. Of all the developed countries, USA is much ahead in terms of equality than Canada, Aus ,UK etc and not mean like other homogeneous countries like Japan or Israel who only prefer and preserve their own. I am not even including Russia, Eastern european or the Muslim countries or Chinese here.

But of course US has much more money and attract top talent which is also a major reason.
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Old 12-19-2018, 11:58 AM
Status: "People and tear gas - either it's a border or it isn't." (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: New York Area
13,804 posts, read 5,449,949 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shanv3 View Post
I agree. Of all the developed countries, USA is much ahead in terms of equality than Canada, Aus ,UK etc and not mean like other homogeneous countries like Japan or Israel who only prefer and preserve their own. I am not even including Russia, Eastern european or the Muslim countries or Chinese here.
Canada calls itself a "multicultural" country, more of a mosaic, than a melting pot. In practice some immigrants "melt" in but others ghettoize. Same with the U.S. but the tendency to "melt" is stronger. Australia and the UK have welcomed immigrants but make no effort to integrate them. Japan, Russia, Central and Eastern Europe et. al. barely permit integration much less encourage it. Israel is more complicated. There has been some integration of Arab minorities but, in my opinion, not enough.
Quote:
Originally Posted by shanv3 View Post
But of course US has much more money and attract top talent which is also a major reason.
What you're saying, I think, is that the more talented make more of an effort to integrate? If so I agree.
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Old 12-20-2018, 09:53 AM
 
1,262 posts, read 1,024,944 times
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The founding fathers. The lawyer John Adams was a key player and had the vision of free people living under common law not a monarchy. He was instrumental in claiming "All men are created equal" and he meant it. He was an abolitionist, he has journals that say as much and more.....
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Old 12-22-2018, 01:44 PM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
16,686 posts, read 33,757,151 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Finally, nobody can "turn to lesbianism" unless they were already gay or bi. It's not like deciding to go vegan, for goodness sakes.
Actually, you're wrong. For decades, there have been women who were lesbians in college, then went back to being straight after graduation and after their male friends finally matured into better adult companions.

And I have noticed older straight women, who after many disappointments with the men in their lives, became lesbians late in life.

With these on and off again lesbians, it seems to be more about having a quality life companion, and less about fulfilling sexual fantasies. Men and women are just wired differently. Men have a strong sex drive.
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Old 12-23-2018, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Sandpoint, Idaho
2,889 posts, read 5,132,258 times
Reputation: 3051
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
I am currently reading Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation by Joseph J. Ellis. The book concerns the Revolutionary and early national era, focusing on Ben Franklin, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and others. Much of the book is still relevant. Among the many good points he makes is that the world, up until that time, had never really known a bi-racial (or multi-racial) society. Many people were advocating emancipation of the slaves. One of the reasons that was never seriously considered by Congress was that no would could comprehend a society where the races were mixed.

The United States was the first such society and I would argue still is the only truly integrated country. It is messy, but it works. The "Great Debate" topic is whether the difficulties in creating such a society engender many of the modern-day tensions over race, immigration and social benefits. The discussion on the latter is playing out in various threads, including Why Many "Conservatives" or Republicans Often Oppose Welfare. I believe we do a pretty good job of integrating, and shouldn't breast-beat ourselves that we're not perfect.


We are doing incredibly well.
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Old 12-23-2018, 12:21 PM
 
836 posts, read 227,646 times
Reputation: 1281
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbgusa View Post
I am currently reading Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation by Joseph J. Ellis. The book concerns the Revolutionary and early national era, focusing on Ben Franklin, George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and others. Much of the book is still relevant. Among the many good points he makes is that the world, up until that time, had never really known a bi-racial (or multi-racial) society. Many people were advocating emancipation of the slaves. One of the reasons that was never seriously considered by Congress was that no would could comprehend a society where the races were mixed.

The United States was the first such society...


Sounds like the Founding Fathers had never heard of the British Empire, the Roman Empire, the Spanish empire, the Portugese empire, the Russian Empire and lots more.



Brazil and other countries in Latin America have long been mixed.


I guess people in the 1700s weren't as knowledgeable about then-current demographics or history.


Today, there are plenty more countries where there are mixes of people, including in Europe.
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