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Old 12-02-2018, 05:58 PM
 
81 posts, read 17,766 times
Reputation: 124

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I have no issue at all with the idea that a voter should be informed about the candidates that they have to choose between. There are several issues that do cause me concern.
1 As a society, we do not do enough to make it easy to vote. At the simplest level, voting takes place on a Tuesday! Traditional yes but certainly not the best day for most working people.
2 Our civic leaders do not go out of their way to ensure that the greatest number of people are able to vote. Rather they seem more preoccupied with ensuring the reverse.
3 Our civic leaders also seem very interested in gerrymandering to ensure that the votes of undesirables are voided.
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Old 12-02-2018, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
19,873 posts, read 9,384,812 times
Reputation: 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Not in Kansas any more View Post
I have no issue at all with the idea that a voter should be informed about the candidates that they have to choose between. There are several issues that do cause me concern.
1 As a society, we do not do enough to make it easy to vote. At the simplest level, voting takes place on a Tuesday! Traditional yes but certainly not the best day for most working people.
2 Our civic leaders do not go out of their way to ensure that the greatest number of people are able to vote. Rather they seem more preoccupied with ensuring the reverse.
3 Our civic leaders also seem very interested in gerrymandering to ensure that the votes of undesirables are voided.
Total agreement. In my view, American citizens who submit a state or federal tax form ought to be automatically registered....for starters.
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Old 12-03-2018, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Florida -
8,499 posts, read 10,298,043 times
Reputation: 15850
It seems like some politicians disproportionately target minorities, students (and immigrants) with large amount of advertising time, money and effort. Obviously, they believe greater voter participation among these groups will directly benefit their chances of getting elected. (These politicians are also the most vocal about gerrymandering and gentrification issues).

Yet, these groups have historically proven themselves to be an unreliable voting block; and are often generally unknowledgeable of major voting issues or candidates.

If the goal was more informed voters, one would think these politicians would spend more time talking about real issues, rather than simply trying to inflame emotional passions.
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Old 12-04-2018, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Texas
33,531 posts, read 18,273,203 times
Reputation: 19345
Quote:
Originally Posted by MinivanDriver View Post
Are Voter Participation Rates Meaningful?
Of course they are.

The higher the participation rate, the more the election results represent the will of the people. I think that low rate reflect deep dissatisfaction with the political system at worst or with specific candidates at best.
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Old 12-09-2018, 08:42 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, Texas
80 posts, read 25,624 times
Reputation: 126
Voter participation polls have always been plagued by false data including:

1) Individuals who voted who are recorded "Legally Dead".
2) Individuals who voted more than once, and it was not caught.
3) Individuals who voted using false identification.
4) Individuals who tampered with voting machines and equipment.

How much false information is there? It depends on who you ask, and which election you are noting. Such things fluctuate election to election but as a whole their seems to be a trend for such activities increasing. Bear in mind that any information you find on voter fraud depends entirely upon how much is detected, not on how much actually occurs. Identity theft for the entire state of California for example doesn't tell you how many false ID's were used at the election, but does tell you how rampant the problem is as a whole.

Last edited by toosie; 12-09-2018 at 08:58 AM.. Reason: Edited out thread hijack
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Old 12-10-2018, 12:43 PM
 
135 posts, read 43,729 times
Reputation: 256
If somebody isn't going to be an informed voter than I'd rather they not vote. There was a story in the paper asking people why they voted for their candidate. This one lady said she voted for the guy because he had more TV advertisements than anyone else. People like that shouldn't be voting.
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Old 12-12-2018, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Rutherfordton,NC
12,735 posts, read 8,414,954 times
Reputation: 8929
Iím betting Iím the odd one out here. I donít vote. Because in the end everyone votes fro the lesser of two evils. Which is stupid. weíre not moving forward or backwards as a nation we make no postive moves towards the good of all Americans. Either the left wins or the right wins, those who vote for one of the other parties are wasting thier vote. Because the system is set up so that a third party will never see office.

Look at what Hillary did to Bernie as an example. The way we vote needs to change but it wont happen.
People have told me itís unamerican not to vote I saw itís unamerican to vote for the lesser of two evils.
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Old 12-13-2018, 02:13 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,812 posts, read 51,931,781 times
Reputation: 29538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Not in Kansas any more View Post
I have no issue at all with the idea that a voter should be informed about the candidates that they have to choose between. There are several issues that do cause me concern.
1 As a society, we do not do enough to make it easy to vote. At the simplest level, voting takes place on a Tuesday! Traditional yes but certainly not the best day for most working people.
2 Our civic leaders do not go out of their way to ensure that the greatest number of people are able to vote. Rather they seem more preoccupied with ensuring the reverse.
3 Our civic leaders also seem very interested in gerrymandering to ensure that the votes of undesirables are voided.

In our state (and some others now) the day of week makes no difference. All ballots are by mail, and they even include a postage-paid envelope here.


Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Total agreement. In my view, American citizens who submit a state or federal tax form ought to be automatically registered....for starters.
Registration is one thing, voting another.



I think a good number of people fail to register for fear of being called to jury duty, though in most states that is not the only source of jurors, we also use driver license records.


Others don't vote because they feel that one vote won't matter. It won't, but if enough people feel that way it adds up and can make a difference.



Some are just too lazy to be bothered, and we are better off that way because if they did vote would probably not take time to study the candidates and propositions. Voting should not be like guessing on a multiple-choice test in school.
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Old 12-13-2018, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Central IL
14,013 posts, read 7,624,035 times
Reputation: 32714
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtovenice View Post
I was innundated this year with texts, phone calls and even by someone going door to door urging me to vote for XYZ.

One text I received was erroneous. Not me, not my state. I texted back that well, I am not "Susan' and I don't live in "X' state.

The response? Well, if you know anyone who does tell them to vote for 'XYZ."

The ones trying to gain votes don't care if people are educated. They just want votes. It's no different than a drunk in bar throwing darts at a dartboard. Oh, I hit the circle. Yay me.

And guess what? No one is unaware of elections. We all know about them. There is no way NOT to know about them (similarly to the campaigns for 'breast cancer awareness' really??? Does any person in the USA not know about breast caner? I digress.).

If people don't want to vote, that's their choice.
Actually, depending on where you live, there may be very few ads on tv - if you're in a very blue or very red area they won't even bother wasting their money on something they see as a given. Online I saw no ads but I have an adblocker...certainly if you're not looking for political discourse you can avoid those websites, blogs, social media. My local government has very little unless you go to a city or county website...you definitely have to seek out the information.
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Old 01-14-2019, 03:44 PM
 
81 posts, read 17,766 times
Reputation: 124
Questioning the right of someone to vote based on whether or not they are an informed voter raises some very serious issues. Many voters are just rusted on party supporters of the R good - D bad variety ( or vice versa). Try telling such people they shouldn't vote as they haven't done a full cost benefits analysis on the various candidates. Some voters may try to do this in some way but they can be easily misled by advertising or candidate personalities. Voters may select a candidate based on one particular issue only to later find that what was the major issue for them turned out to be a very minor issue for the candidate.
Voting is therefore a gamble. As a voter, you will not be perfectly informed and the positions of your preferred candidate may well change over their time in office. Given that we cannot make a perfect decision, allowing someone to vote who is potentially ill-informed or who votes based on gut feeling is still a valid expression of their desires.
I would therefore support compulsory voting which as poster MARISAMAY above has pointed out is used in Australia (actually compulsory attendance not compulsory submitting a valid vote) rather than a system which aims to selectively restrict someone's right to vote as this reeks of fascism.
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