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Old 09-11-2008, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Sugar Grove, IL
3,131 posts, read 10,270,546 times
Reputation: 1604

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Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
Nicely stated. Do you see this as being "on the honor system" or as something that requires a rule?

If it's "on the honor system" how would you recommend spreading the word and convincing students to use an absentee ballot? Something as low key as ads in the student newspaper--or would this require an announcement from the dean? If this requires a rule, what sort of rule would it be, and how would it be enforced? Who would make the rule?

One problem I have with absentee ballots is that you're deciding issues for a town you're absent from. I remember when Detroit had massive layoffs in the early 1980's and a huge number of people moved to Houston. They still voted as Michiganders, sending in thousands and thousands of absentee ballots. This resulted in a very odd statistic: according to election returns, the third largest city in Michigan was Houston, Texas. Once you've moved to a new state, should you really be voting on issues for the town you used to live in?

Voter registration is not on the honor system! it is a legal issue. You fill out the paperwork and are assigned a district etc in which to vote. there are no points to quibble on.

 
Old 09-11-2008, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,256,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgresident View Post
Voter registration is not on the honor system! it is a legal issue. You fill out the paperwork and are assigned a district etc in which to vote. there are no points to quibble on.
LOL--but before they assign a district, the applicant has to choose which state to file the form with.

This whole question came up because of an incident that happened near Clemson University, which is in the foothills of western South Carolina. Some boys who had pretty thick "New Yorker" accents approached a voter registration table and picked up the forms, which of course were for South Carolina.

(OK, OK, before we go any further they could have been from New Jersey--I don't know my accents that well. But they didn't sound like local kids.)

Now before we get to the rest of the story, let's stop to consider this part first.

Should the volunteers have steered them away, maybe saying something like:

"You boys seem to be from New York. You don't want one of these forms--you should go online and get an absentee ballot."
 
Old 09-11-2008, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Santa Monica
4,708 posts, read 7,561,996 times
Reputation: 1023
I don't think the OP remembers the issue about lowering the voting age to 18. It had to do with the military draft being used during the Vietnam War. At the time this voting rule was put into place, the issue was, Is it legitimate politically for a person of a certain age to be drafted but also that class of persons can't vote on the issue? Military conscription was seen as that serious of an issue. The participants in the conscription should be allowed to vote as to their own fate as potential conscriptees.
 
Old 09-11-2008, 02:02 PM
 
1,535 posts, read 1,802,390 times
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The resolution to this question is quite simple, no class of individuals should be denied the right to vote as long as they adhere to the residency requirements for the state which they reside, period.

In the present economy there are quite a few people other than college students who live and work in one state part of the year and in another at other times, for example in the Northeast, there are individuals who live and work in the New York or Metro Washington area during the work week and commute back to their "family" residence on weekends or days that they are allowed to telecommute. Are we going to propose delving into each individuals voting patterns to determine where they should vote? I doubt it.

Singling out college students is inherently unfair and discriminatory, and I suspect that the question is being raised more out of temporal political considerations than any long term issues of fairness.
 
Old 09-11-2008, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,256,409 times
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Now, what the volunteer actually did was talk to the boys for a few minutes about various election issues. Then she encouraged them to get a local drivers license (for a couple of reasons, but mostly so they would be able to vote locally, although a school ID works in SC, too).

She did point out that people who vote for Obama in a state like South Carolina probably won't make a difference (South Carolina's likely to go red no matter what). But registering as a SC resident was a way of "sticking it to the man." In other words, a way of making a statement. And it would be something to brag about.

Was this ethical?
 
Old 09-11-2008, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,256,409 times
Reputation: 18984
Quote:
Originally Posted by ParkTwain View Post
I don't think the OP remembers the issue about lowering the voting age to 18. It had to do with the military draft being used during the Vietnam War. At the time this voting rule was put into place, the issue was, Is it legitimate politically for a person of a certain age to be drafted but also that class of persons can't vote on the issue? Military conscription was seen as that serious of an issue. The participants in the conscription should be allowed to vote as to their own fate as potential conscriptees.
LOL, of course I remember that. I came of age during the 60's, and knew many people being drafted who wanted to vote so they would have a say in the matter. I tried to phrase my questions carefully and openly so this would be a fair debate, that's all.
 
Old 09-11-2008, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Santa Monica
4,708 posts, read 7,561,996 times
Reputation: 1023
Why then did you ask whether it is legitimate for a college student (age 18 or more) to vote? Maybe your concern is mostly about the residency issues for where an out-of-state college student votes?
 
Old 09-11-2008, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Sugar Grove, IL
3,131 posts, read 10,270,546 times
Reputation: 1604
No, the behavior of the person doing voter registration was not ethical. If people have the proper credentials, that should be all there is to it. how they choose to vote is their own business and whether or not they were writing in the man in the moon, should not matter!
 
Old 09-11-2008, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,256,409 times
Reputation: 18984
Quote:
Originally Posted by sgresident View Post
No, the behavior of the person doing voter registration was not ethical. If people have the proper credentials, that should be all there is to it. how they choose to vote is their own business and whether or not they were writing in the man in the moon, should not matter!
Point of clarification: She didn't tell them who to vote for. Most people who approach a voter registration table these days already have strong opinions on the subject.

The question is, should she have handed them a South Carolina form or told them to go online and fill in an absentee ballot?
 
Old 09-11-2008, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,256,409 times
Reputation: 18984
Quote:
Originally Posted by ParkTwain View Post
Why then did you ask whether it is legitimate for a college student (age 18 or more) to vote? Maybe your concern is mostly about the residency issues for where an out-of-state college student votes?
Ah, I get your point. This will become more obvious when I tell you the rest of the story. But before I do that, I wanted to hear some general opinions on the topic.

You know, there are plenty of people who disagree with the law, and who think anyone under the age of 21 doesn't have enough life experience to be able to vote. There are those who say "When I was that age I bought into all sorts of nonsense, but then when I got out into the real world and worked for a few years I realized most of it was a bunch of bull..."

I may not personally agree, but I'd like to hear from all sorts of people about why they have the opinions they do. Everyone has reasons behind their opinions. (At least, I hope so!)
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