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Old 04-19-2014, 09:21 AM
 
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I don't know a way around it. In small communities with large colleges, student voting can skew local elections in odd ways. Tompkins County, NY is where Cornell University and Ithaca College are. Cornell especially attracts students from all over the country. A disproportionate number come from New York City. If you look at the voting patterns in Tompkins County, they are more like New York City's than Cayuga County's or Tioga County's.

This matters when it comes to local laws. The permanent residents of Tompkins County have to live with laws passed by officials elected by transients who do not have to endure the consequences.

But for national elections, the effect must be marginal. A student who votes in Ithaca, NY can't vote in Pittsfield, MA. Whatever party benefits from the gained Ithaca vote loses from the lost Pittsfield, MA vote. In the limit, it's a wash.

 
Old 04-19-2014, 01:55 PM
 
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Young people voting. Lol
 
Old 04-19-2014, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 6,921,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheena12 View Post
"Should College students be allowed to vote?"

If the college student is over 18, that is the law of the land.

My first vote was as a college student. However, I was out of state and I voted via absentee ballot. My permanent domicile was with my parents. A dormitory is not a permanent residence.

However, many upper division and graduate students maintain their own apartments and do not go home every Summer. In that case, I think it should be up to the student in question to choose one place where they call home.
Exactly. I voted as an undergrad for the first time in Buffalo, NY because that's where I considered I lived. I voted by absentee ballot when I was in grad school in Lincoln, NB, because that was never my permanent residence.
 
Old 04-19-2014, 05:52 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
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College students should vote in the state where they are legal residents. If they are going to college out of state then they should send an absentee ballot back to the place where their car is registered and their parents pay taxes. Same for the military.
 
Old 04-19-2014, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 6,921,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Troyfan View Post
I don't know a way around it. In small communities with large colleges, student voting can skew local elections in odd ways. Tompkins County, NY is where Cornell University and Ithaca College are. Cornell especially attracts students from all over the country. A disproportionate number come from New York City. If you look at the voting patterns in Tompkins County, they are more like New York City's than Cayuga County's or Tioga County's.

This matters when it comes to local laws. The permanent residents of Tompkins County have to live with laws passed by officials elected by transients who do not have to endure the consequences.

But for national elections, the effect must be marginal. A student who votes in Ithaca, NY can't vote in Pittsfield, MA. Whatever party benefits from the gained Ithaca vote loses from the lost Pittsfield, MA vote. In the limit, it's a wash.
I think that you are overstating the impact of student voting on local elections and discounting the impact of college faculty on local elections. In the case of Tompkins County, NY, and many other small towns/cities with large colleges/universities, the staff and faculty of Cornell University and Ithaca College probably have much more impact on local politics than do the students. Many if not most students are dorm students and I don't believe they can vote based on their college addresses. Many of the grad students don't necessarily consider Ithaca to be their permanent residence whereas faculty and staff obviously would unless they were just temps.
 
Old 04-20-2014, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Central Maine
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First of all, not all students from northeastern states vote Democrat. That is like saying that EVERYONE in the southeast is nothing but a hound dog owning, tobacco chewing, pickup truck driving, uneducated, Yankee hating, rebel. Having lived down there I know this NOT to be the case. Second, yes, I know that college students can help sway a vote in states like, let's say, Vermont, with small populations. But what about after they leave college and decide to take up residence? I admit, someone let's say 18, 19 years old living in a college dorm and never having even lived in my state prior to this election and being able to vote on whether my town should increase it's school budget, fire/police department, build a new recreation center, is quite frightening. No real vested interest there, especially if they are not planning to stay after graduation. When I lived as an adult in southeastern, western states I did not vote, except in national elections, as a courtesy to the locals. That was on my part. And I know from having worked at three colleges that colleges, whether North, South or West, tend to be centers of political activism, mostly liberal these days. I really think that there is no good answer to this question in light of our constitution against the rights of communities/states to control their own political outcomes.
 
Old 04-20-2014, 10:53 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,155 posts, read 6,335,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
Two points before we get started on this discussion:

1. College enrollment is at an all time high. As a result, a historic number of students from New England, New York, and California (blue states) have not been accepted to schools near their homes and instead have gone to schools in the south and the midwest (often red states).

2. The electoral vote will decide this election, not the popular vote.

As a result: One strategy during this election has been to appeal to "out-of- state" students, telling them they have the power to turn their new state purple.

My question: Since these students are temporary (4-year) residents, do you think this is
a) a smart strategy, or
b) an abuse of the electoral system
c) a waste of time because college students don't vote, anyway

More questions behind the question:

Do you think college students should be allowed to vote? Why, or why not?

Should college students' votes be assigned to their address prior to starting school? And how would this be done?

Should the rule be that students who live off campus can vote, but those living in a dorm cannot?

Should students be allowed to vote in national elections, but not local elections?

For purposes of disclosure, I'm active in voter registration and think registering out-of-state college students is a brilliant strategy. But I'm more interested in hearing what other people think--so it may be a while before I step in to present my POV.
IMO, students are of the age to vote, so yes, IMO they should be allowed to do so. As for where they vote, I think it should be where they list their permanent residence. If that's out of town from where they're attending college, they either request an absentee ballot from that location, or they travel back to vote in their home towns- most likely the absentee ballot is easier. If they've changed their permanent residence to the location of the school they attend, then they register to vote and do so there.

What IMO should be developed is a way to ensure that folks who live part time in more than one location ( ie, college students attending school in one state, but whose permanent residence is another state, "snowbirds" who spend several months a year or more in Florida, Arizona, etc and the rest of the year "up north) don't vote in more than one location. There have been issues- we've seen them in Florida where snowbirds have requested absentee ballots from their "up north" location, and also voted in precincts in Florida, and gotten away with it, because the states don't do any cross-checks to see if a registered voter is also registered anywhere else. I think there should be some mechanism to make cross-references, or checks to ensure that folks vote only in one location.
 
Old 04-20-2014, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Humboldt County, CA
788 posts, read 609,914 times
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I think it's interesting that many consider college students part-time residents of their college towns, when they actually spend 9-ish months of the year in those towns. What happens in their college cities and towns certainly has more of an impact than what happens in their hometowns, doesn't it? It's ridiculous to think that we shouldn't have a say.

I'm not living on campus, so I don't know if a dorm address is different, but when I moved up here I updated my voter registration pretty early on. I haven't missed an election since I turned 18, and didn't plan to start just because I moved.
 
Old 04-21-2014, 06:25 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,155 posts, read 6,335,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cephalopede View Post
I think it's interesting that many consider college students part-time residents of their college towns, when they actually spend 9-ish months of the year in those towns. What happens in their college cities and towns certainly has more of an impact than what happens in their hometowns, doesn't it? It's ridiculous to think that we shouldn't have a say.

I'm not living on campus, so I don't know if a dorm address is different, but when I moved up here I updated my voter registration pretty early on. I haven't missed an election since I turned 18, and didn't plan to start just because I moved.
Apparently you established your residency in your college town when you started school there, or when you became eligible to do so. That makes you eligible to vote there, and participate in anything else open for residents there. Any student who does the same thing is also likewise eligible to vote, and so on.

But, as you may or may not know, many students don't regard their college location as a permanent address, preferring to keep their former, or home addresses as their primary residences. In those cases, if they're registered to vote in their location of primary residence, it doesn't matter how involved they get into the activities/politics of their college town, they can't vote there, and they likely cannot run for public office there either.
 
Old 04-21-2014, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Humboldt County, CA
788 posts, read 609,914 times
Reputation: 1486
I do know that, and I think it was covered already, as well as being both common sense and the law: you only get to vote in one place, so take your pick.

I imagine students who plan to return to their home towns post-graduation might feel more invested in it. I don't intend to return to mine and while I also don't plan to stay where I am, I also want to leave the place in good shape.
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