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Old 09-14-2008, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
526 posts, read 1,124,011 times
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What do you think about it? I think it's absurd; to let a pet drown or die a cruel death.

I, for one, treat my pets like family members. No matter what, I would find a way to bring my pets with me.

Your opinions?
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Old 09-14-2008, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
43,858 posts, read 43,559,234 times
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I'm sure if people have an option they will always choose to take their pet(s). Sometimes it is not an option. If people have to evacuate based on government assistance or use another form of public transportation....many times they can't take their pet. In those cases, people who stay behind and put themselves in harms way due to not wanting to leave their pet, they are probably making the wrong decision.
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Old 09-14-2008, 05:09 PM
 
Location: NY
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I too believe that pet owners will always bring their pets with them if it is at all possible. However, as was seen even in the Hurricane Gustav evacuations just last week, in many areas there are large numbers of people who don't own a car and have no other means of getting out other than public transportation which may prohibit pets on board. And even for those who do have access to a car but need to go to an evacuation center, most of them do not allow pets inside.

My area had emergency plans in place just in case the last tropical storm hit us was worse than expected (turned out it was far milder than anyone expected but you never know), and the radio stations were making a point that SOME designated shelter areas were "pet friendly" and thus, anyone evacuating with a pet should call the station or log into certain websites to find out which shelters those were... because all the other shelters would not allow pets.

My area is also home to the North Shore Animal League who has an amazing record of rescuing pets left behind as a result of natural disasters. They bring the pets back here to their facility on Long Island for adoption. They are down south right now, engaged in "Rescue Mission: Hurricane Ike" .... great coverage of it on their website! North Shore Animal League America - the world's largest no-kill animal rescue and adoption shelter
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Old 09-14-2008, 06:32 PM
 
Location: So. Dak.
13,495 posts, read 33,423,325 times
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I would never leave my pet behind. I just read an article (I posted the link to it under "Hurricanes") that said people in Galveston were standing in line waiting to get on buses. They were clutching oversized bags AND their pet. If we keep insisting that our furry family be accepted, things will change more all the time.
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Old 09-14-2008, 07:25 PM
 
Location: NY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammie View Post
If we keep insisting that our furry family be accepted, things will change more all the time.
I agree with the principle but disagree that public pressure will ever be stronger than the fear of litigation. The main reason that pets (except for service animals, i.e. seeing-eye dogs) are barred from public buildings and many public transporation services is because of liability risks. Suppose someone brought a dog onto a train or into a building, even on a leash, and that dog ended up biting someone. It's not only the dogs owner who would be sued, but the owner/operator of the bus or building where the event took place. Ours is an extremely litigious society and I don't see that ever changing. (By the way, the only reason service animals cannot be barred from public places is the result of lawsuits instituted on the basis of discrimination against the visually handicapped.)
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Old 09-15-2008, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,250,526 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by totallyfrazzled View Post
I agree with the principle but disagree that public pressure will ever be stronger than the fear of litigation. The main reason that pets (except for service animals, i.e. seeing-eye dogs) are barred from public buildings and many public transporation services is because of liability risks. Suppose someone brought a dog onto a train or into a building, even on a leash, and that dog ended up biting someone. It's not only the dogs owner who would be sued, but the owner/operator of the bus or building where the event took place. Ours is an extremely litigious society and I don't see that ever changing. (By the way, the only reason service animals cannot be barred from public places is the result of lawsuits instituted on the basis of discrimination against the visually handicapped.)
Perhaps the solution would be to insist pets be kept in carriers. That would prevent some problems, such as dog bites--and also the worry that people might show up at a bus stop with several goats or a whole flock of chickens. Of course, space becomes an issue here (animal carriers take up more room than a pet sitting on your lap).

Even if you don't have a carrier, there is usually enough warning before a major storm to go to a pet store and buy one. And maybe a pet carrier should be added to the list of basic emergency supplies that everyone should have on hand.

Personally, I don't think I could leave a pet behind, especially an elderly animal that's trusted me all it's life. I wouldn't be able to get on the bus. Fortunately, I have a car so I have options. I know busses are more efficient than driving your own car but for this reason (and a few other reasons) I would probably choose to drive my own car away from a disaster site.
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Old 09-15-2008, 06:35 AM
 
Location: USA
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Never going to happen. If I couldn't take my pet, I would stay. They are family. I twice had to evacuate the Outer Banks of NC due to a hurricane. Happened two years in a row, you'd think I'd learn.

Anyway we took our German Shorthaired Pointer to the Sheraton in Norfolk and he was fine. It was funny walking the dog through the lobby, but he was really good and well behaved. Not the same as evac from home as we were on vacation, but you get the picture.

Last edited by Pilot1; 09-15-2008 at 07:14 AM..
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Old 09-15-2008, 07:13 AM
 
Location: NY
1,416 posts, read 4,897,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
Fortunately, I have a car so I have options. I know busses are more efficient than driving your own car but for this reason (and a few other reasons) I would probably choose to drive my own car away from a disaster site.
Oh definitely, I agree. I was thinking of the people in New Orleans though, for instance. While I was watching the Gustav coverage (I forget whether it was on the Weather Channel or on CNN) a commentator said that more than 50% of the population of New Orleans does not own a car, which is why fleets of buses had to be provided for the evacuation. I agree that carriers would be the answer for small and midsized animals, although the logistics of confining a large dog who had never been inside a carrier in its life might be a bit, ah, challenging.
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Old 09-15-2008, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,154 posts, read 57,274,608 times
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I'm sure many of the people forced to leave their pets behind treat their pets like family as well. However, shelter and transportation options may be limited, and pets are not welcome in many such places.

I try not to judge people for the tough choices they have to make, unless I've walked a mile in their shoes.
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Old 09-15-2008, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,250,526 times
Reputation: 18984
Quote:
Originally Posted by totallyfrazzled View Post
I agree that carriers would be the answer for small and midsized animals, although the logistics of confining a large dog who had never been inside a carrier in its life might be a bit, ah, challenging.
Excellent point. But.... if a major hurricane was coming, and you knew you had to board a bus I bet you'd rather put that dog in a carrier than leave it behind. No matter how challenging it might be.
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