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Old 09-15-2008, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Montana
1,219 posts, read 2,757,921 times
Reputation: 671

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I like the rules at this new forum!

OK.. Without placing blame at anything that has happened in the past, just simply looking at the current situation we have with fuel costs (that effect everything else like food, services, home heating/cooling costs, electricity, and pretty much anything a person might need at the store... ) what steps do people think and take right now to help our situation?

Please try to keep this from turning into a political debate.

Thanks!
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Old 09-15-2008, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
3,088 posts, read 4,545,968 times
Reputation: 1598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timberwolf232 View Post
I like the rules at this new forum!

OK.. Without placing blame at anything that has happened in the past, just simply looking at the current situation we have with fuel costs (that effect everything else like food, services, home heating/cooling costs, electricity, and pretty much anything a person might need at the store...

What steps do people think and take right now to help our situation?

Please try to keep this from turning into a political debate.

Thanks!
Many of us think that the current fuel crisis is just the impetus that the U.S. needs to finally "break" the dependence on foreign oil. . . a mixed blessing, for the moment, at least, but one that potentially could leave us much better off in the future. We need to move "full speed ahead" on the development of alternate, and especially sustainable technologies. Solar, and wind technologies, combined with water, and nuclear technologies (if a safe and "permanent" way to store nuclear waste can be found) are our best bets! Continued and expanded drilling for fossil fuels is, in my opinion, very much of a "wasted" effort. It will only be another few, short years, before the yield from even newly discovered oil fields will be so drastically diminished that continued fossil fuel production will be "priced out of the market" for most. Bring back the E.V.! That was NOT a failed vehicle, but rather, one that the major auto makers believed would be less "profitable" than fossil fuel vehicles. . . improve battery technology, explore the possibilites of hydrogen driven motors, etc. etc. These are very managable "problems" for our best and brightest minds. . . we CAN both increase energy production while reducing energy costs if we (collectively) decide that would be in the best interest of the worlds population!
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Old 09-15-2008, 08:42 PM
 
3,553 posts, read 6,788,849 times
Reputation: 2304
The quickest, cheapest and most long lasting effect can be achieved with CONSERVATION. And I don't mean the Jimmy Carter putting on a sweater kind!

I actually know people living in TX who have about 6" (if that much) insulation in their attics, who don't have radiant barriers and ridge and soffit vents. I'd bet that OK, MS, AL, GA, SC, FL (although they actually have some building standards in FL NOW) and many southern states are in the same boat.

Low flow toilets, showers and faucets. I think I read somewhere that the "average" family uses 600 gallons of water per day. That seems WAY HIGHT to me, it might include all the water that goes on all the crops to produce all the food we eat. Anyway, my family uses about 2,000 gallons PER MONTH. When the water is warming up for the shower, I collect it in a bucket and water plants with that. I turn the faucet off when brushing my teeth and washing my face.

This ties in to something I heard once, that PUMPING WATER is the THIRD BIGGEST consumption of water in CA. Probably top 5 in most places because it weighs a lot and pumps consume a lot of electricity. Imagine if EVERYONE reduced their water consumption by just 25%, you city (or public utitlity) would save money, and we wouldn't see nearly as many freight trains running up and down the country.

I've slowed my freeway driving down to 60-65 MPH. Increased my mileage from about 22 to 29, not too shabby.

I've declared my own personal war on the Sheikhs, the utility companies and "big oil".

golfgod
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Old 09-15-2008, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Orlando
8,221 posts, read 10,953,327 times
Reputation: 4022
For many years we have dealt with oil addiction but have taken no steps to resolve it. Even in that light much progress has been made to improve solar cells and wind generators. What progress would we make if we actually spent money and energy on it? We basically are driven by what makes most sense from a monetary standppoint and finally it makes more sense to go for alternate sources. There is a new solar cell being made that is as thin as milar and quite efficient, it will ahve many applications and they think they will get its cost down greatly onnce it is in production. I think the same will be true for the Helix wind generators. I think these and other renewable energies are the answer, it will cure the addiction and thrust this country into a new industry where we will lead the way. The opportunities are endless and the future is bright. We need only make the commitment and move away from the old paradigms.
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Old 09-16-2008, 01:55 AM
 
225 posts, read 306,494 times
Reputation: 115
I agree with golfgod that conservation will take us far, but I really think we need to stop thinking in terms of living like we do, only cleaner and more efficiently. The current American system of stand alone, single family dwellings, long commutes and large, inefficient cars and trucks needs to be rethought. In the end suburbia is a dying model for how to live. We need to be thinking higher population concentrations, mixed use properties, mass transit and telecommuting, as well as getting away from the notion that Americans are entitled to Hummers, 5000 sqft homes, and 30 minute showers. We either do this willingly and while it is relatively easy to do it, or we do it later when we are forced to by extreme costs for energy. I think a good way to start is work harder to make such efforts patriotic. America is and always has been a 'can-do' nation. It's time to prove to the world we can live well on much much less.
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