U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Great Debates
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Would you be able to afford to Educate your child under a fully privatized system?
Yes 40 59.70%
No 27 40.30%
Voters: 67. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-07-2008, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 34,371,245 times
Reputation: 4893

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TristansMommy View Post
Yeah.. if they pay per credit they can take whatever they can afford and it may take them 8 or 9 or more years to complete.. LOL.. that's a looooonnnngg time to get your career going!!
So what! Anything worth doing is worth the time - don't be so impatient.

BTW - did you know that you can get most, if not all, student loan debt, forgiven if you work in certain areas of the country for a period of time?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-07-2008, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
5,217 posts, read 4,113,603 times
Reputation: 908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
So what! Anything worth doing is worth the time - don't be so impatient.

BTW - did you know that you can get most, if not all, student loan debt, forgiven if you work in certain areas of the country for a period of time?

No.. did not know that. That is interesting.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2008, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 34,371,245 times
Reputation: 4893
Quote:
Originally Posted by TristansMommy View Post
No.. did not know that. That is interesting.
One example - We know a guy who went to Med School - graduated and became a General Practitioner - load of student loan debt. Went to work in Tuba City, Arizona (Navajo Nation) - worked with the Native American population for four (4) years - the Federal Government forgave 90% of the student loan debt.

A woman I know - went to law school - ended up working in the inner city of LA - doing "store front law" in a poor area - state of Ca paid off her student loans
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2008, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 40,279,788 times
Reputation: 10915
Quote:
Originally Posted by TristansMommy View Post
That May be true of a higher education , but elementary and secondary education is public and therefore guaranteed for all.

Listen, there are programs out there for the less fortunate to gain a college education via scholarships etc. The problem we're going to be seeing in the current economy, is that soon parents will have trouble and students will have trouble getting the loans required to cover the tuition with the credit crunch that we may find that college education is going to be out of reach for a lot of people without that credit.
Public education, in my PERSONAL experience, is next to worthless. When you know more than the teacher, it's pretty bad. When you're having to correct their spelling, or mathematical ability?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2008, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Right where I want to be.
4,507 posts, read 7,827,141 times
Reputation: 3304
Quote:
Originally Posted by TristansMommy View Post
LOL.. that's funny.. have you looked at how much education cost these days? Sorry.. most parents "savings for college" run out by the second year. Also, it takes much longer than 4 years to complete most degrees these days. I have two brothers that went to college full time, worked while in college , had some help from my parents including a second mortgage and they have student loans to pay off college.. so your assertion that no debt is needed to get through college is laughable!
2007-08 College Costs
Have you looked? Average tuition and fees for an in-state school are less than $7000 per year. A 2 year school is less than $3000.

Suppose a student lived at home, attended community college 2 years and then moved to a 4 year university. How easy is it for that student to graduate debt free without his parents taking out a second mortgage or going into debt? Cost of tuition/fees (based on 2007-2008 averages and student living at home) for a 4 year degree: $20,000.

Lets assume the student starts working a minimum wage job for 2 years in high school and all 4 years of college (6 years total). PT during the school year and full time summers.

Yearly pay=$7020 x 6 = $42,120. Even with taxes withheld that is enough to pay for the first 2 years of community college living at home and probably more than enough to live on campus the last 2 years. This also isn't accounting for the fact that once old enough the student could work more than 40 hours per week in the summers. This student could not only graduate without debt (or putting his family in debt) but he could also have a decent car and a savings account to start off his new career.

This is not at all unrealistic.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2008, 01:07 PM
 
372 posts, read 760,952 times
Reputation: 126
I was a resident assistant on campus for 2 of my 3 years of undergraduate at a state university. That paid for my housing, plus gave me a small amount of cash each month. I also worked as a parking attendant and network assistant to get extra cash.

I graduated with two bachelor's degrees in 3 years because I chose to take classes throughout the summer as well as taking more than 15 credit hours per semester. One summer I cleaned rooms and another summer I graded state tests on top of my school work. It wasn't the most glamorous work, but it kept me relatively debt free. My fourth year I worked a full time job + overtime and lived in a house with my college roommates who were still taking classes. The money I made and saved that year was invested and gave me a great head start on life.

I'm not saying this to brag, only to give an example of how someone from a lower middle income family can make it through higher education with little to no debt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2008, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 40,279,788 times
Reputation: 10915
I had a part time job before I joined up. Know where the money went? To food and rent. Even while finishing high school, my parents required me to pay them room and board!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2008, 08:37 PM
 
302 posts, read 514,604 times
Reputation: 381
If schools were privatized and parents were suddenly forced to ante up for their children's public school education then you would see a much different school system. The schools would have to compete for dollars and parents would have a greater say in how those dollars were spent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2008, 10:25 PM
Status: "Done with the 100s (hopefully)?" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
5,411 posts, read 8,299,874 times
Reputation: 5760
Regarding higher education: in many companies, there is also the option of tutition reimbursement. This is when an employee can go to college to earn a degree, and the employer will pay for a certain amount of the tuition & books ... so long as the employee meets the requirements. Those requirements usually relate to length of employment with the company, satisfactory work performance, and grades that are at a "C" or higher. I received one of my degrees thanks to my company chipping in and helping with the cost. I was able to work during the day, and go to classes at night. It was a lot of extra work, but it was worth it in the end. Many others have been able to do this very same thing as well. It's just a matter of getting one's priorities straight, and looking at the big picture.

This is further evidence that private contributions to education are much more effective than forcing the taxpayers to subsidize it. Now, if K through 12 became privatized (as it should be), not only would average Joes & Janes like most of us be relieved of this property tax burden, but companies would be as well. This would give companies extra money ... and I forsee the possibility of more employers lending a hand to help employees pay for their children's private school tuition & books, just like they do now for adults who want to go to college and work at the same time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2008, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
5,217 posts, read 4,113,603 times
Reputation: 908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valley Native View Post
Regarding higher education: in many companies, there is also the option of tutition reimbursement. This is when an employee can go to college to earn a degree, and the employer will pay for a certain amount of the tuition & books ... so long as the employee meets the requirements. Those requirements usually relate to length of employment with the company, satisfactory work performance, and grades that are at a "C" or higher. I received one of my degrees thanks to my company chipping in and helping with the cost. I was able to work during the day, and go to classes at night. It was a lot of extra work, but it was worth it in the end. Many others have been able to do this very same thing as well. It's just a matter of getting one's priorities straight, and looking at the big picture.

This is further evidence that private contributions to education are much more effective than forcing the taxpayers to subsidize it. Now, if K through 12 became privatized (as it should be), not only would average Joes & Janes like most of us be relieved of this property tax burden, but companies would be as well. This would give companies extra money ... and I forsee the possibility of more employers lending a hand to help employees pay for their children's private school tuition & books, just like they do now for adults who want to go to college and work at the same time.

At a time when we're discussing how companies are cutting back on healthcare becasue of the costs per employee and benefits are being cut you're suggesting that companies that people work for subsidize or offer as a benefit to subsidize their employees education?

Most of the employers in the U.S these days are small businesses, who are struggling to afford health insurance benefits for their employees. Other companies are taking their jobs offshore to foreign countries.

As for school by "charity"... America's largest charity managed to raise 5 million in one year (the American Red Cross). 5 milllion is not enough to help educate or subsidize private education for over 50 million plus kids.

What happens in years of economic struggle when charities do not bring in enough due to the belt tightening (which is happening this year!). Do we then say "sorry kids, no school this year. We didn't recieve enough charity to help pay for your tuition".

THis argument was brought up and argued many pages back.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Great Debates
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top