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Old 04-11-2009, 04:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Nice post especially you point about the hip hop industry of today.
The hip hop industry of today has been very maligned. It wasn't always like this. Rap/hip-hop started out as being socially conscious. What happened was that the dollar trumped everything else and well, there it goes from there.

 
Old 04-12-2009, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pirate_lafitte View Post
The hip hop industry of today has been very maligned. It wasn't always like this. Rap/hip-hop started out as being socially conscious. What happened was that the dollar trumped everything else and well, there it goes from there.
Oh believe me, I know and I was in great debate the last week and a half with posters about this in the music forum. If I could, I could go deeper on why the socially conscious rappers are being shut out but that's another conversation.
 
Old 04-12-2009, 07:44 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Repubocrat View Post
I am sure this topic will be controversial but I have noticed that back in the 60's and 70's, African Americans did some great things in terms of entertainment. I personally love shows like Good Times, Sanford and Son, etc. These shows were great in terms of quality but also in terms of being truly "American", not strictly for African Americans. In terms of music, the same thing applies to a lot of Motown songs, some incredible music was created by African Americans and these songs were simple, good and they seemed to appeal to the entire American population regardless of race. Lately, it seems like most AA shows have become something that only African Americans appreciate and understand and they tend to emphasize on stereotypes, ignorance and stupidity as if that is something cool. I was listening to a song from the 70's by the Cornelius Brothers called "It is too late to turn back now" and I was amazed that they actually spoke normal English in those times and used proper grammar, the song is amazing and people of all races can relate to it. On the other hand, I was listening to a rap song yesterday by some Soldier Boy and I can't even understand half of what he is saying, the lyrics make absolute no logical sense and he just repeats the same stupid lines 10 times, over and over. Very sad!
That's nothing. You ought to listen sometime to interviews of people like Sammy Davis, Jr., Duke Ellington, Nat King Cole, etc. They sounded like college professors compared to today's "typical" African American popular music icon. LOL

After the whole slavery thing, African Americans worked hard to change the stereotypes the perpetuated the American psyche for literally hundreds of years. They did not strive to be "as good" as their white counterparts. No, they worked hard to be BETTER, because it was only in being better, smarter, more talented that they could ever hope to be accepted and respected. There are legions of African Americans all throughout history who were doctors, nurses, lawyers, performers who worked their collective behinds off to show everyone, of all races, that people of color were worthy of honor and respect.

What a horrible slap in the face the current American "culture" is to these fine people.

It is popular because it makes somebody, somewhere MONEY. And the entire "popular culture" mentality (of whites, blacks, etc.,) is too brainwashed and stupid to understand this.

I cannot even begin to imagine what decent African Americans must think of these pathetic rappers who degrade their race and make a virtual laughing stock of of themselves. If they only knew how absurd and cartoonish they appear to the rest of us.

By the way, I LOVED the Motown sound. When my peers were listening to Led Zepplin I was singing along to the Supremes.

20yrsinBranson
 
Old 04-12-2009, 10:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
That's nothing. You ought to listen sometime to interviews of people like Sammy Davis, Jr., Duke Ellington, Nat King Cole, etc. They sounded like college professors compared to today's "typical" African American popular music icon. LOL

After the whole slavery thing, African Americans worked hard to change the stereotypes the perpetuated the American psyche for literally hundreds of years. They did not strive to be "as good" as their white counterparts. No, they worked hard to be BETTER, because it was only in being better, smarter, more talented that they could ever hope to be accepted and respected. There are legions of African Americans all throughout history who were doctors, nurses, lawyers, performers who worked their collective behinds off to show everyone, of all races, that people of color were worthy of honor and respect.

What a horrible slap in the face the current American "culture" is to these fine people.

It is popular because it makes somebody, somewhere MONEY. And the entire "popular culture" mentality (of whites, blacks, etc.,) is too brainwashed and stupid to understand this.

I cannot even begin to imagine what decent African Americans must think of these pathetic rappers who degrade their race and make a virtual laughing stock of of themselves. If they only knew how absurd and cartoonish they appear to the rest of us.


By the way, I LOVED the Motown sound. When my peers were listening to Led Zepplin I was singing along to the Supremes.

20yrsinBranson
Al Roker was told as a child that he had to be twice as good as anyone else to get just as much. You present a very good point that the persons of that era had something to prove. Part of it was the fact that in those days, many people felt no shame in telling a black person that they couldn't do the job. For some blacks, they took this as a challenge. I remember being in high school and in particular, my senior year. I consider myself somewhat nerdy and I like it that way. I take pride in it, even if some people take it as weird. With that said, I remember being in class sometimes and some of the black students would cut up in class. Many times I felt like I had to behave better than average in order to prove that there are black people who care about education. I knew it, but I felt like I had something to prove.

Much of the hip hop that is popular today is very repulsive. Sadly, it is exactly that, popular. I think one of the biggest issues is that much of today's youth tries to emulate the rappers.

I am not surprised anymore that alot of people willingly act like that. I think the reason is that what started as socially conscious music turned into garbage could have to do with the fact that people will try what sells. The garbage out there sells. People who want to turn a quick buck will come up with anything. Many of the people who listen to it sometimes do not feel good about themselves and try to emulate who they think represents "cool".

I am big on Motown myself. I actually never heard of Metallica or Led Zeppelin until I was 11. I heard of The Jackson 5 before I heard of Led Zeppelin.
 
Old 04-13-2009, 05:49 AM
 
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The first time I saw MC Hammer rapping in a Fried Chicken commercial I knew the socially conscious era for hip hop was over. Black record mogels have proven to be just as money grubing as all the rest. Even with the so called discovery of Eminem Hip hop's "Great White Hope" at a crucial time when white records buyers where increasing.
 
Old 04-13-2009, 06:36 AM
 
1,967 posts, read 1,525,260 times
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I will say the following will all sincerity:

Until black people can open their eyes and realize "the man" is not out to get them, and start taking responsibility for their actions, the perpetual cycle of drugs, violence, and fatherless children will continue.

There's no excuse for any child born in America to not attend public school, try hard, make good grades, go to college, and earn a living for his/herself. Don't give me that "never had a chance to escape the ghetto" bull****.
 
Old 04-13-2009, 11:51 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.smith904 View Post
I will say the following will all sincerity:

Until black people can open their eyes and realize "the man" is not out to get them, and start taking responsibility for their actions, the perpetual cycle of drugs, violence, and fatherless children will continue.

There's no excuse for any child born in America to not attend public school, try hard, make good grades, go to college, and earn a living for his/herself. Don't give me that "never had a chance to escape the ghetto" bull****.
I think you have hit the nail squarely on the head with this post. There is a lot of anger and resentment in the African American community. I am not saying it is not justified, but to continue on the present path is getting them nowhere fast. I believe that people of color can progress in their own way without having to emulate the anglo-saxon culture of white America. There has to be a happy medium somewhere along the way. Things cannot continue as they are.

Perhaps having a bi-racial president will inspire many inner-city youth to strive for greater things. I hope so.

20yrsinBranson
 
Old 04-13-2009, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh but I'm ready to relocate......
727 posts, read 1,650,644 times
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Too many people still have that "master" mentality!!! Its not up to white americans to judge Black culture just like Blacks dont judge white culture!!........
 
Old 04-13-2009, 07:14 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,527 posts, read 29,228,109 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarqueseGilmore View Post
Too many people still have that "master" mentality!!! Its not up to white americans to judge Black culture just like Blacks dont judge white culture!!........
Statistics do not judge. How many African American teenagers graduate from high school??? College??? How many single mothers raising black children are on public assistance? How many black children are in graveyards due to gang violence?

You do not have to judge to see facts as they are. I wish it were not so, but it is.

20yrsinBranson
 
Old 04-14-2009, 06:56 AM
 
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Those statistics are not just the statistics of African Americans but of all poor people Black/ White and Hispanic. If we single out poor blacks then we illuminate poor whites. I would have to ask how can Whites, who have obviously had more advantages historically than Blacks or Hispanics, still share those statistics. You can go to some of the poorest areas in the South where there are no Blacks and Hispanics and all the statistics are similar to those of urban Blacks
Why are African Americans criticized more for being poor than any other group in America?
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