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Old 10-15-2008, 02:42 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 4,794,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
We may not "need" - but we can "want". And, if I can afford it, I should be able to have what I "want". My home, for my wife and myself and our foster daughter, is about 5,000 sq.ft. We will be adding to it within the next 12 months.

Could we "do" with less? Probably. But, we don't want to.
Other than the possibility that you want to gloat, I don't see your point. If you want something bigger and can afford it, then build it.

If it gets too expensive for you to pay the taxes and utilities, I'll feel just as sorry for you as I do for the people who bought a Hummer for a daily driver.
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Old 10-15-2008, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 34,380,187 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
Other than the possibility that you want to gloat, I don't see your point. If you want something bigger and can afford it, then build it.

If it gets too expensive for you to pay the taxes and utilities, I'll feel just as sorry for you as I do for the people who bought a Hummer for a daily driver.
My point was (is), you seemed to be saying that people should not go after what they want - that they should only have what they need.

BTW - the Hummer is not a bad choice -
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Old 10-15-2008, 03:02 PM
 
Location: NY
1,416 posts, read 4,902,281 times
Reputation: 588
Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
What ever happened to people buying little starter houses, paying them off, and then saving some money to trade up?
That's what I did, and what I believe many people of my (baby boomer) generation did as well. However, I also think that the concept of what a Starter Home is, has changed from our generation to the next.

For example, my parents' house was a 1950 Levitt cape which was probably no more than 800 or 900 square feet, on less than 1/4 acre. The first home I bought, during the early 1970s, was a small ranch that was probably about 1200 sq ft, again on 1/4 acre. I saved/traded up from that during the 1980s to a 3200 sq ft waterfront-property highranch on 1/3 acre. I sold that during the late 1990s and bought a 4000+ sq ft colonial on 1/2 acre. I sold THAT house early this year and now my SO (who did pretty much the same thing as I, over the years) and I are looking for a house together which will probably be somewhere between 2500 and 2700 sq ft. But of the houses I've owned, only the first one (1200 sq ft ranch) ever had a mortgage on it; the rest of the houses, thanks to the housing boom/bubble, I was able to buy for cash. That 1200-sq ft ranch is MY idea of a Starter House because it was really not much bigger than the house I grew up in.

However here's my point: I still have many friends in the 3200-sq-ft neighborhood, who were raising kids there during the 1980s. Those kids are now of an age to be looking for houses of their own, but they are ALL looking for a Starter House of at least 2000 sq ft. And why? Because they grew up in houses at least that big, if not bigger, and for them, 1000 or 1200 or 1500 square feet is not a 'Starter House' .... it's a 'shack'. Most of these kids are living in apartments that are 800 or 900 or 1000 sq feet (the size of the houses my generation grew up in!) and so of course they're looking for something larger/better in a house.

Property taxes do come into play bigtime as well. We live in an area where you really cannot find a house in a safe middle-income community with taxes of less than $7000 year. That little 800-900 sq ft cape that I grew up in, which btw has never been expanded by the people who bought it after my parents died, is currently paying almost $9000/year in taxes. I recently looked up a similar house on our local MLS website; the few that haven't been expanded are selling for about $400,000 and the ONLY reason they're that cheap is because they are so small. (Yes, 400K is considered in the 'affordably priced' bracket hereabouts.)

In such markets as ours, it's impossible to even talk about home ownership being a 'right' ... it is definitely in the 'reward' category.... and many of us would go so far as to say it's a 'miracle'.
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Old 10-15-2008, 08:01 PM
 
Location: The Netherlands
8,567 posts, read 14,524,507 times
Reputation: 1573
Is life a reward or a right?
Only once you can answer this question should you try to answer the op.
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