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Old 10-19-2008, 03:12 PM
 
186 posts, read 413,661 times
Reputation: 147

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it is a lot deeper than what many are saying.
yea putting money into schools is great (IMO paying teachers better and providing updated books and other materials is necessary).
But it starts with the parents and the students when they are young.
A lot of people who live in very low income neighborhoods tend to be on the uneducated side.
They tend to pass this ignorance onto their kids....so their kids tend to act the same way.
And we know how a lot of parents would rather act like their kids can do no wrong than deal with the issues.
And in lower income neighborhoods, individuals are strugging, and their main goal is to make it until the next day. Not, if i do this today, I can have this in a couple years (some of them dont even think they will be alive in a of couple years). So the mentality is different, how they are raised is totally different, and lastly the environment.
There are sooooo many distractions/temptations for kids in low-income environments.
This is why I think it has to be handled differently because it is such a deeper situation than many think.
You have to teach the children how to not give into the temptations they are going to run into, you have to teach them that if they do something today it will pay off in the long run. You have to help their parents become better role models and take away some of the ignorance that would be detrimental to the child's future. Just throwing money at schools and police wont do much, you have to take into account what being in a low- income community does to you mentally.

And the whole gentrification does NOT work. Just making things LOOK better does not mean they are. Having a nicer looking house/ apartment does not mean you all of a sudden have a job, a college degree, money in your pocket. So these same people will probably do the same thing they were doing before. The same temptations from the environment will STILL be there...I can't stress it enough that it is more psychological than anything else and it has to be dealt with when they are little kids all the way up to graduation from HS.

If you do not agree with me, or you think my writing skills are horrible (lol, I get that a lot, but I'm not here to write a scholarly response), then so be it.

 
Old 10-19-2008, 04:07 PM
 
3,536 posts, read 5,076,921 times
Reputation: 822
What about mixed income neighborhoods? That worked in Chigaco's Cabrini Green development. Gentrification is not the fixing of neighborhoods, its the movement of higher income people into lower income developments. I agree that there is a mentality issue that must be dealt with. However, school programs have been shown to help with that mentality issue. Students respond WAY more to peers (even at the young age of 4 years old) than parents. More popular programs, more involvement from the kids. Some schoolds of psychology go as far as to suggest that parents play a minimal role (kids are more influenced by other kids). You change the mentality with the new programs and try to make them work. Hence mixed income neighborhoods. A study showed 10 lower income kids coming from a low income high school and placed them in a high income high school. They performed better at the high income school. At the end of the switch, their GPA declined once placed back to the low income high school. Thus, they stayed at the high income high school (although, they did not fit in socially, they strived to fit in and thus tried to get a better GPA). Another study looked at the advantages of mixed income high schools. They outperformed their low income counterparts (same general location, however, a middle class/lower class mix vs. only a lower class mix). Each of the schools recieved comparable amounts of funding, but since there was a "middle class culture" (college bound, stay out of trouble, etc) that fostered the tone of what was socially acceptable.
 
Old 10-20-2008, 04:04 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,521,867 times
Reputation: 1266
I think that this whole idea of gentrification is not what it appears to be. Gentrification occurs when the land that low income neighborhoods is located on increases in value. The 'power brokers' realize this and want to put up higher income housing to be able to tax the properties at a much higher rate. How well off the low income people fare in this situation is highly questionable, but it's sold as the greatest thing since sliced bread.
 
Old 10-20-2008, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Orlando
8,181 posts, read 16,155,849 times
Reputation: 49730
I'm surprised but not surprised that not one has said put the responsibility where it belongs..on the residents. I've seen millions of $$$ thrown into the projects and it all be ruined within 6 months.

This is part of the success of Habitate for Humanity. If people actually put their own sweat into what they have, they tend to treat it better.

I would never support just something that's just a hand out.

Last edited by Granny Sue; 10-20-2008 at 07:38 AM..
 
Old 10-20-2008, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Chicago, Illinois
3,047 posts, read 7,965,994 times
Reputation: 1367
of course not. ever since the dawn of man, there have been have's and have nots. it will always be this way unless society because communistic or something.

today's ghettos are that way because those people who are say 15-20 years old, with kids, without jobs, with bad habits, etc. have been raised by people exactly like them aka never raised right. it's a never ending cycle that grows larger by the day. certain people just don't value education, morality, themselves, or others. it's a shame, but that's why there will always be ghettos.
 
Old 10-20-2008, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Jersey
2,162 posts, read 3,235,952 times
Reputation: 1680
Another thing that we(by that I mean the education system) must realize is that all students aren't equal when it comes to upbringing, and adopt education methods accordingly. Inner-city school curriculums need to concentrate more heavily on things such as ethics, life skills, and giving students more exposure to the world outside of the "hood."
 
Old 10-20-2008, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Atlanta and St Simons Island, GA
20,893 posts, read 32,892,157 times
Reputation: 12542
One thing about American cities...they are seldom static, and neighborhoods within them are re-inventing themselves all the time. There are neighborhoods here in Atlanta that I had written off even 15 years ago that have made big comebacks...ie East Atlanta, Old Fourth Ward and Kirkwood.
 
Old 10-20-2008, 11:54 AM
 
186 posts, read 413,661 times
Reputation: 147
Quote:
Originally Posted by that1guy View Post
What about mixed income neighborhoods? That worked in Chigaco's Cabrini Green development. Gentrification is not the fixing of neighborhoods, its the movement of higher income people into lower income developments. I agree that there is a mentality issue that must be dealt with. However, school programs have been shown to help with that mentality issue. Students respond WAY more to peers (even at the young age of 4 years old) than parents. More popular programs, more involvement from the kids. Some schoolds of psychology go as far as to suggest that parents play a minimal role (kids are more influenced by other kids). You change the mentality with the new programs and try to make them work. Hence mixed income neighborhoods. A study showed 10 lower income kids coming from a low income high school and placed them in a high income high school. They performed better at the high income school. At the end of the switch, their GPA declined once placed back to the low income high school. Thus, they stayed at the high income high school (although, they did not fit in socially, they strived to fit in and thus tried to get a better GPA). Another study looked at the advantages of mixed income high schools. They outperformed their low income counterparts (same general location, however, a middle class/lower class mix vs. only a lower class mix). Each of the schools recieved comparable amounts of funding, but since there was a "middle class culture" (college bound, stay out of trouble, etc) that fostered the tone of what was socially acceptable.
I still think the parents still have a major role. I'm not talking about when they are 17, I am talking about when they are like 4 or 5...it needs to be started then...the parents need to be better role models. They need to encourage education and reward good work.
 
Old 10-20-2008, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Chicago, Illinois
3,047 posts, read 7,965,994 times
Reputation: 1367
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nella925 View Post
I still think the parents still have a major role. I'm not talking about when they are 17, I am talking about when they are like 4 or 5...it needs to be started then...the parents need to be better role models. They need to encourage education and reward good work.
I wish most of them had more than one parent...
 
Old 10-20-2008, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM - Summerlin, NV
3,436 posts, read 5,786,273 times
Reputation: 682
Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
I've always wondered why the city leaders just let the ghetto remain, why not clean it up a little and make the city a safer place.
Like Albuquerque Desert Sun, well that has been tried, it even got more ghetto..(eeekkk south valley)
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