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Old 10-23-2008, 07:47 AM
 
3,628 posts, read 9,024,457 times
Reputation: 2013

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mbmouse View Post
Whether I agree to this does not matter. There is free trade in this country (still) and if this pharmacy chose to open a pharmacy they can sell or not sell what they want, it is the great thing about being in America. Someone has the right to open a porn shop, a strip club, tattoo place, etc, why shouldn't a pharmacy owner operate his store the way he wants? It kind of amazes me that less people would speak out about the strip club verses a pharmacy that refuses to sell birth control based on it's own moral view.
Well it's still my view that it's pretty ignorant because birth control IS USED FOR OTHER THINGS.
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Old 10-23-2008, 08:20 AM
 
19,183 posts, read 27,737,865 times
Reputation: 4000
Thankfully, there are plenty of actual, full-service pharmacies available to serve the people of Chantilly, VA, which is more or less an upper-middle class area that surrounds Dulles International Airport. Population was 12K in 1980, about 30K in 1990, and over 40K in 2000. Probably close to 50K today. Such would not be the case however in many more rural areas of Virginia and other states.
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Old 10-23-2008, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Washington DC
5,915 posts, read 7,084,905 times
Reputation: 948
No person is compelled to do something they are morally against, but in many states you can lose your license to practice over this. Licensed professionals have a code of ethics to which they are held. A pharmacist in many areas is required to fill a script by his ethical oath.

In addition, in many areas of the country it isn't as easy as driving a block to another pharmacy. It may be very burdensome to travel to the next town to get a prescription refilled.
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:33 AM
 
13,779 posts, read 23,208,064 times
Reputation: 7378
don't get me wrong, I do not necessarily agree with a pharmacist, essentially passing judgment on me by refusing to fill a script that he/she feels is morally wrong but it is their decision.

Heck, I had my children at a Catholic hospital and the doc would not perform a tubal ligation...
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Old 10-23-2008, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
5,915 posts, read 7,084,905 times
Reputation: 948
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrstewart View Post
don't get me wrong, I do not necessarily agree with a pharmacist, essentially passing judgment on me by refusing to fill a script that he/she feels is morally wrong but it is their decision.
It's that simple for profession that don't have to be licensed, but if you have agreed to a code of ethics to treat patients based upon best medical knowledge and judgement, you are bound by that oath and not your particular moral beliefs. If you can't follow your oath, you can't fullfill the ethical requirements to practice the profession.
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Old 10-23-2008, 01:42 PM
 
Location: NYC area
3,486 posts, read 4,938,535 times
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Licensed professionals have an obligation to fulfill public policy over promoting their own beliefs. A lawyer can be assigned to defend someone against his will. An emergency room doctor has no right to walk away from a bleeding rapist-murderer. Professionals cannot refuse services on the basis of race or ethnicity, no matter what their personal beliefs are.

I think allowing pharmacists to pick and choose which prescriptions they are willing to fill is scandalous. Preliminarily, doing so allows the pharmacist to second-guess a doctor. Second, it's a slippery slope -- what if tomorrow some pharmacist declares that it's against his religion to dispense life-saving antibiotics? Or seizure medication? Or anything invented by Jews?

A number of people here have said that patients have the option of going to some other pharmacy. Let me explain why this is wrong. Someone has already pointed out, correctly, that this may not be a viable option in a remote, rural community, or where time is of the essence (such as with a morning-after pill). That, however, is only a small part of the problem. The bigger issue is that telling the patient to go to some other pharmacy is ignoring the difference in the bargaining positions of the pharmacist and the customer. In effect, you are putting the onus on the customer -- who is often a person in a legitimate medical need or a rape victim -- to endure hardships in order to accommodate the pharmacist's religious belief. This isn't right. The onus instead should be on the zealot. Patients shouldn't be have to run around town looking for a compassionate pharmacy -- it is pharmacists who, if they have a problem with how modern drugs are used, should quit their jobs and go do something else for a living. The First-Amendment right to practice one's religion is only a right against imprisonment, execution or property confiscation; it is not a right to a specific job, a professional license, or a position of power that allows you to impose your beliefs on the public. If performing your duties as a pharmacist conflicts with your religion -- be something else. Scrap the pharmacy counter and open a candy store that doesn't sell candy.
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Old 10-23-2008, 02:42 PM
 
1,597 posts, read 1,579,354 times
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I wonder if that pharmacy will sell certain women's and men's fashion/exercise magazines which clearly talk about and promote uninhibited sex and how to achieve the perfect orgasm with your boyfriend/girlfriend (NOT spouse), along with showing female models in clothes that only barely contain enough scraps of fabric to cover their nipples....?????
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Old 10-23-2008, 03:31 PM
 
13,779 posts, read 23,208,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rlchurch View Post
It's that simple for profession that don't have to be licensed, but if you have agreed to a code of ethics to treat patients based upon best medical knowledge and judgement, you are bound by that oath and not your particular moral beliefs. If you can't follow your oath, you can't fullfill the ethical requirements to practice the profession.
My husband is in the medical field and he can most certainly choose who he takes as a patient...he doesn't turn someone away because he feels if they come to him they need his assistance and assistance comes in all shapes and sizes.
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Old 10-23-2008, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Washington DC
5,915 posts, read 7,084,905 times
Reputation: 948
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrstewart View Post
My husband is in the medical field and he can most certainly choose who he takes as a patient...he doesn't turn someone away because he feels if they come to him they need his assistance and assistance comes in all shapes and sizes.
I suspect you have a superficial understanding of the canons under which your husband operates. But the subject is really can a pharmacist refuse to fill a prescription on something other than medical grounds.
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Old 10-23-2008, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Aiken S.C
765 posts, read 1,680,569 times
Reputation: 388
Well if a person has a right to do with thier body as they wish under thier own moral conscience . then why can't the same respect be given to the doctor or pharmacy who under thier own conscience decide not to give out a morning after pill or contraceptive? and i'll give you a hint it has nothing to do with the hippocrateth oaths ..
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