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Old 10-31-2008, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Orlando, Florida
43,858 posts, read 43,585,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by char65 View Post
Whether the parent have rights to a minor's record depends on the state the minor lives in and whether you are talking about medical, mental health or substance abuse issues.

In regards to the laws, they may be a little strict, but they do serve the purpose of protecting the minor in cases where the parent shouldn't have access to the child's record. Keep in mind that all parents aren't good parents. Some parents abuse their children (physically and mentally.) Some molest their children. If a child reaches out for help, this is one way of making sure that aren't any barriers in place of them receiving it.
Keeping in mind that all parents aren't good parents is a phrase which should constantly stay in our mind before we judge the system. I think it is unfair for all parents to be placed behind barriers in order to protect the children who have crappy ones.....but what else can the authorities really do?

I didn't even think about children who are molested or abused by a parent and this being the only way they can get confidential medical help when needed.

Great post Char!
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Old 10-31-2008, 05:49 PM
 
48,519 posts, read 81,086,895 times
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Then those same laws should make the doctor send the bills to the juvenile. If the parent has to pay they have a right to know what they are paying for. If the state wants this then the state should pay;end of story. It is dangerous IMO when the state decides what is best for a child without any proof that the child is not being mistreated. They are very quick tho to give a child back to a parent they have good evidence is mistreating the child. Warped system.
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Old 10-31-2008, 09:37 PM
 
274 posts, read 546,145 times
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The state may not get the proof though if the parent is always intervening, ie. sitting in on physical examinations.

I'm curious what reasonable boundaries parents think there should be. Do parents here sit in on physicals/gyn apts/dental appointments of their teenage children?

I'm sorry, but I think it's inappropriate if I were 17 to have my father watch as my gyn did a pelvic.
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Old 10-31-2008, 10:57 PM
 
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But the problem lies in the fact that no abuse has to be part of the problem at all and in amny cases the record does not have to be revealed to the parent. The child could have STD not caused by abuse or any number of things. If its abuse the chikld would be ordered examined by the police and the parents lawyers would have access to that if accused. Even before a arrest the probale cause affidavit is on record stating the reason to believe a criem was committed and the personwhothere is evidence committed it.We are talkign about alot less than abuse by teh aprent here in many cases. But for example "I could call in and report witrhput giivng my name that anyone of you were abusing your child. The child welfare authirties would then investiagte, Even if you were cleared ;your name in most staes I am aware of would ahve you listed in their abuser files. You could do nothgn to force them to expounge the record. But if youy were arrwsted and no charges were filed or you were declared innocent you could in most states.many times courts act on infornation provided by child protedtive services and ifnd once the fact come out at a hearing more and more that often they don't backup the action taken. That is what recently happened in Texas.
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Old 10-31-2008, 11:12 PM
 
274 posts, read 546,145 times
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I understand your argument, but many times a doctor is the first to discover abuse.

And it isn't only abuse, but other issues as well. For example, if a doctor asked a teenager, "have you ever drank/smoked/done drugs/had sex/been raped?" a teen may not answer truthfully if their parent is standing right there. This will impede any type of treatment.

Same goes for therapy and visits with a psychiatrist. If a kid knew everything he/she said would go straight back to the parents, then why would he/she be honest? What would be the point?
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Old 11-01-2008, 04:16 PM
 
Location: NY
1,416 posts, read 4,902,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
Then those same laws should make the doctor send the bills to the juvenile. If the parent has to pay they have a right to know what they are paying for.
This has a corollary in the case of college records. Once a student is 18, colleges must have the student's permission to allow parents or anyone else to see their grades, records, etc (which the parents WERE allowed to do throughout their child's education up until that point). The colleges don't care who pays the student's tuition: That's irrelevant to the privacy issue. Even if the parent pays every dime, the college will not allow them access to any aspect of the student's information without written permission from the student, even if the parents claim "We are footing the bill so we have a right to know what we're paying for" .... Nope, legally they do not.

So logically what applies to educational records should also apply to medical records: It doesn't matter whose pockets are funding the service provided; what matters is the person receiving the service.
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Old 11-01-2008, 04:23 PM
 
274 posts, read 546,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by totallyfrazzled View Post
So logically what applies to educational records should also apply to medical records: It doesn't matter whose pockets are funding the service provided; what matters is the person receiving the service.
Good rule of thumb!
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Old 11-01-2008, 05:16 PM
 
48,519 posts, read 81,086,895 times
Reputation: 17978
Quote:
Originally Posted by totallyfrazzled View Post
This has a corollary in the case of college records. Once a student is 18, colleges must have the student's permission to allow parents or anyone else to see their grades, records, etc (which the parents WERE allowed to do throughout their child's education up until that point). The colleges don't care who pays the student's tuition: That's irrelevant to the privacy issue. Even if the parent pays every dime, the college will not allow them access to any aspect of the student's information without written permission from the student, even if the parents claim "We are footing the bill so we have a right to know what we're paying for" .... Nope, legally they do not.

So logically what applies to educational records should also apply to medical records: It doesn't matter whose pockets are funding the service provided; what matters is the person receiving the service.

I agree once the chind has reached the adult age in teh staet he has as much privacy right as anyone else. We are talking about a under age child still living at home not emanciapoted. The parent has responsiblity under law with this child where they would not with a adult child.Thsi is really a power of teh stae verus parnets. The stae for example want to to be libale in civil court ofr anyhting the child deos and be respo0nsible for any legal fees. In many cases child protective services has been given power that even a police office does not have and that is very dangerous.
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Old 11-01-2008, 05:46 PM
 
274 posts, read 546,145 times
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Well, there were many times in my household where child protective services should have intervened, but didn't.

I wished I had been taken to a doctor/therapist/counselor and had a chance to speak one on one about what had happened.

Tex, if you are a parent, you appear to be a good one. But what reasonable boundaries do you think parents/children should have? ie. If I were 17 should my father be able to witness me laying down while my gyn performs a pelvic? Should it be an all or nothing system?
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Old 11-03-2008, 06:39 AM
 
Location: West Texas
2,441 posts, read 5,249,050 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelEyez02403 View Post
Well, there were many times in my household where child protective services should have intervened, but didn't.

I wished I had been taken to a doctor/therapist/counselor and had a chance to speak one on one about what had happened.

Tex, if you are a parent, you appear to be a good one. But what reasonable boundaries do you think parents/children should have? ie. If I were 17 should my father be able to witness me laying down while my gyn performs a pelvic? Should it be an all or nothing system?
Angel... I feel you on the abuse issue.. but all the times I've ever been with my kids at a pediatrician (and, again, my wife is a nurse at a Pedi's office, and she agrees), no doctor ever goes from smoking or drinking to "Have you ever been raped?"

My point on starting this whole thread was a parent doesn't even have the OPTION of getting involved to help their children. If a child is sexually active, doesn't tell the parent for whatever reason, and continually comes up with an STD, it's obvious that the child (male or female) isn't using a contraceptive (or using it properly). The parent "could" help in this issue (of course it's all depending on the parenting skills of the adult in issue). But do we stop the "good" parents from effectively being able to continue their role because of the "bad" ones? If I am held responsible for all of my childs health and education until they are of legal age, then I should have access to all the tools and information I need to effectively manage that. It's accountibility without responsibility, and I've seen that method fail in any system ever tried in.
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