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Old 02-22-2009, 10:18 AM
 
3,651 posts, read 8,112,779 times
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For most people, it's a lot more common sense than needing some excessive attention to every little detail. Eat at least reasonably healthy foods most of the time and get enough exercise. It's not rocket science.
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Old 02-22-2009, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Texas
1,848 posts, read 4,119,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZugZub View Post
Baloney. As an adult, you alone are responsible for what you are shoveling into your piehole. As a parent, you alone are responsible for what your kids are shoveling into their pieholes.

Man up, people. Take some responsibility for yourselves for once.
However, ingredients that the food industry uses in packaged foods has changed over the past 30 years or so, since the 70s. So the foods that were around 30 years ago are now more toxic than ever.

Food companies started using palm oil, corn syrups etc. to reduce cost, increase satiety and shelf life.

Basically, a person who does not know that the ingredients have changed think they are purchasing something normal - a loaf of bread, a jar of jelly etc and do NOT know the detail of the ingredients.
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Old 02-22-2009, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZugZub View Post

I don't disagree that it may be faster and more convenient from time to time, but it is an utter fallacy that it's cheaper, and when I see so many people keep saying it, I will correct it.

Yes, but for families who may live in an "inner city" atmosphere, going to a grocery store and purchasing bags of fresh food may end up being more pricey in the long run.

If a person does not have a car and has to take a bus (not a knock on those who use public transport, I think it is great...) to go to a grocery store and then does not have the arms to carry a week's worth of groceries home and also perhaps does not have the time to cook because they may work two jobs...well you can see how a bag of greasy food may be percieved as "cheaper". Especially when a FF establishment is on every corner in poorer areas and a grocery with fresh produce is not.
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Old 02-22-2009, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
It has become totally acceptable to raise children in a 'fast food' manner......as an aside to ones 'regular' life.
How many kids spend time with a parent , learning to shop and cook ?
How much time does the 2 worker family have to spend teaching them?
How many families think it's more important to make enough money to eat those fast food dinners out rather than stay home and 'work' at being a parent?

Who is there to teach the children?
Are we....the collective we.....going to teach the kids that our way of living has collapsed the economy at the expense of their health and welfare?
Will the silver lining of all this be that people are going to be forced to revert to a lesser standard of living that may include having the time to raise our own kids?
Do we still have the skills?
And yes....I understand that YOU are raising your children in a perfect manner so no need to defend yourself
do not worry old_cold, we are still out there

no kiddos yet, but hubby and I plan to have them see us shop at farmer's markets, cook food at home, etc.
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:06 PM
 
3,651 posts, read 8,112,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cr1039 View Post
However, ingredients that the food industry uses in packaged foods has changed over the past 30 years or so, since the 70s. So the foods that were around 30 years ago are now more toxic than ever.

Food companies started using palm oil, corn syrups etc. to reduce cost, increase satiety and shelf life.
? How are these "toxic" - ?


Quote:
Basically, a person who does not know that the ingredients have changed think they are purchasing something normal - a loaf of bread, a jar of jelly etc and do NOT know the detail of the ingredients.
Gee maybe they should try READING them then. It's required by law (er the labelling, not the reading).


Quote:
Originally Posted by cr1039 View Post
Yes, but for families who may live in an "inner city" atmosphere, going to a grocery store and purchasing bags of fresh food may end up being more pricey in the long run.
Sorry but this is nonsense.

Quote:
If a person does not have a car and has to take a bus (not a knock on those who use public transport, I think it is great...) to go to a grocery store and then does not have the arms to carry a week's worth of groceries home and also perhaps does not have the time to cook because they may work two jobs...well you can see how a bag of greasy food may be percieved as "cheaper".
No, I can't. Quicker and more convenient, maybe, but not cheaper. Also it still ignores the severely poor health aspect, and sorry but poverty is not an excuse for doing that.

PS not saying I don't appreciate that holding down 2 jobs/etc is harder and that some "short cuts" are so hard to understand here and there. But making even at least semi-healthy meals on the whole is most certainly cheaper than fast food - it's not even close. And it doesn't have to be a big involved deal if time/energy is short. One obvious example: italian food. A simple jar or 2 of sauce and a box of pasta can feed a family several times and it's easy, pretty quick, extremely cheap, most people like it - and it's FAR healthier than fast food. So not buying the "I can't help it I'm poor" BS.

(and take it from me, I've milked that option plenty and I'm no gourmet chef - kinda lazy too.
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Old 02-22-2009, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Texas
1,848 posts, read 4,119,202 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bill545 View Post
? How are these "toxic" - ?


Gee maybe they should try READING them then. It's required by law (er the labelling, not the reading).
Palm oil is more saturated than pig fat and raises cholesterol. As for corn syrups, the product basically tricks the body into thinking it is digesting sugar, but it is not. There in lies the problem when it comes to the digestive process. Also, some suggest that is suppresses the feeling of fullness encouraging people to over eat.

As for reading the labels, I totally agree. Totally. However, a consumer whom is bombarded with "whole wheat" being good and breakfast cereals being "normal" and such advertising can easily rely on the labels on the FRONT of the product such as "heart healthy" "low fat" "all natural" etc.

While I agree that people should read ingredients carefully, the food industries are purposefully tricking consumers - there in lies their "fault" in the obesity epidemic.
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Old 02-22-2009, 08:01 PM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
16,469 posts, read 33,418,786 times
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I worked a luncheon last week. The college hosted the lunch for 110 guests from Ghana. They were all overweight. The men had paunches. The women were heavier than the men and could have passed for obese American black women. So it's not just the American diet and lifestyle that is causing the high obesity rates. I've heard that Australians have issues with obesity also. Not everyone there is fit like Crocodile Dundee. Maybe it's the sedentary city life and having easy access to food.
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Old 02-23-2009, 09:24 AM
 
550 posts, read 1,071,035 times
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Just how often do you americans eat food that has been prepared outside your own kitchen? I don't think I know anyone who eats outside of home more than 3-4 times a week, although most do it a lot less.
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Old 02-23-2009, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Columbus, OH
857 posts, read 1,228,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Niceguy89 View Post
Just how often do you americans eat food that has been prepared outside your own kitchen? I don't think I know anyone who eats outside of home more than 3-4 times a week, although most do it a lot less.
I know plenty of people who eat out more than that, for example: my roomate has yet to buy groceries of any kind and weve been in our new place since dec! Hes one of those "lucky" people who just does not put on weight so he eats basically junk all day every day. I still tell him hes going to have heart attack but he ignores it
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Old 02-23-2009, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
5,082 posts, read 12,579,535 times
Reputation: 10543
Default Obesity in America- who is to blame?

I would blame the fat people.
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