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Old 05-10-2009, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Under a bridge.
3,196 posts, read 4,716,018 times
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?Why is it so hard for people to admit that they are responsible for overveating band being fat? You can be thin if you just eat no more than 9 calories daily per pound of desiered body weight. Some people find that nearly impossible to do in a country of such extreme wealth
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Old 05-11-2009, 01:21 AM
 
Location: The Netherlands
8,567 posts, read 14,516,394 times
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Originally Posted by dcashley
Quote:
?Why is it so hard for people to admit that they are responsible for overveating band being fat? You can be thin if you just eat no more than 9 calories daily per pound of desiered body weight. Some people find that nearly impossible to do in a country of such extreme wealth
Because if you are not properly informed (because the labels on the food products are indecipherable) you can't make a conscious choice.
Another problem is when healthy food becomes far more expensive than unhealthy food.
As if healthy food is a luxury product.
Unfortunately price does influence people's decision (and not always in a positive way).

Last edited by Tricky D; 05-11-2009 at 02:11 AM.. Reason: typo
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Old 05-11-2009, 06:39 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,013,230 times
Reputation: 5443
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tricky D View Post
Originally Posted by dcashleyBecause if you are not properly informed (because the labels on the food products are indecipherable) you can't make a conscious choice.
Another problem is when healthy food becomes far more expensive than unhealthy food.
As if healthy food is a luxury product.
Unfortunately price does influence people's decision (and not always in a positive way).
Why is it someone else's responsibility to teach us about food labels? You want to eat healthy, go to a library and read a book. You don't need someone else to teach it to you.

I am also tired of the 'it is cheaper to eat bad food' arguement. Go to Wal-Mart/Sam's Club/something like that, buy ingredients and cook for yourself. It is cheap and healthy. You don't have to shop at Whole Foods to eat healthy.
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Old 05-11-2009, 06:52 AM
 
Location: The Netherlands
8,567 posts, read 14,516,394 times
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Originally Posted by hnsq
Quote:
Why is it someone else's responsibility to teach us about food labels? You want to eat healthy, go to a library and read a book. You don't need someone else to teach it to you.
Because it is the company's responsibility to give clear information about their products.
Unfortunately companies don't always do this (see the tobacco industry who claimed for many years that smoking does not endanger public health).
Besidez not everyone is a chemist.
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Old 05-11-2009, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,538,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcashley View Post
?Why is it so hard for people to admit that they are responsible for overveating band being fat?


Why is it so hard for the food marketing industries and lobbyists and media advertisers to admit that they have been lying to the public about nutrition for their own profit?

Do you see a general trend of human nature here? You can disprove my point by listing all your own personal irresponsibilities, but I bet you won't. Because it's hard to do. Human nature.
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Old 05-11-2009, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,496,291 times
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For starters, I tend to believe that some people are pre-disposed to being overweight. I'm not and have never been overweight, but I have a cople friends who fall into the morbid obesity category, and they've told me that food is a "comfort" to them. If they have a bad day, hitting a drive-through on the way home makes them feel better. If I have a bad day, I lose my appetite and am likely to eat less than normal.

Combine that with the fact that cheap fast food is available everywhere (once I counted the fast food restaurants within a mile of our old house in Calif. and it was over 50!) and crappy junk food in grocery stores, then everyone's lack of time to prepare healthy meals, and you've got an obesity problem. I choose not to eat fast food, with the exception being times when there is no other option, such as a quick layover in an airport or forgot to bring my lunch to work. And even then, I choose the healthiest thing I can find on the menu. But I don't eat fast food more than 5 times per year, if that. But it's probably easier for me to avoid it because I don't crave it. I also sort of view it as "trash food" because of all the paper and crap it comes in and the pile of trash you're left with after eating the food- so it sort of grosses me out.
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Old 05-11-2009, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,538,289 times
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It's a discipline thing. Everybody's life is divided into things about which they can discipline themselves, and things they can't. Obese people are in the group that can discipline themselves about some things, but eating is not one of them. It's like squandering money or driving fast or doing the laundry. You can make yourself do some things, but not others.

If a person goes on a diet with a mindset that it is an ordeal what will some day end when they reach their target weight, it will never happen. But if you can resign yourself to the fact that you can readjust yourself to taking other pleasures, but eliminating dining from the list of them, you can build a life mindset in which going on a binge actually sounds unattractive and it clashes with "who you are".

For many people, the key is portion size. I suggest you smash all your dinner plates and sweep up the pieces and put them in the dumpster. Save the saucers and salad/dessert plates, and serve your meals on those, and don't take seconds.
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Old 05-11-2009, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,496,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post

For many people, the key is portion size. I suggest you smash all your dinner plates and sweep up the pieces and put them in the dumpster. Save the saucers and salad/dessert plates, and serve your meals on those, and don't take seconds.
I definitely think this is true. I refuse to eat at restaurants that give you enough food to choke a horse. (Claim Jumpers, Cheesecake Factory come to mind). We only eat out about once per month, but I've found that locally-owned, non chain restaurants, tend to serve more reasonable portions. Although I think Chilis (or is it Applebees or TGIFs? - they're all about the same) has some new reasonable portions menu.

But back to the plate size - If there is less food on the plate, I feel fine after eating it. If I eat somewhere that serves way more than I need on one plate, I tend to eat it all, and then feel sick/stuffed.
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Old 05-11-2009, 11:17 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,013,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tricky D View Post
Originally Posted by hnsq Because it is the company's responsibility to give clear information about their products.
Unfortunately companies don't always do this (see the tobacco industry who claimed for many years that smoking does not endanger public health).
Besidez not everyone is a chemist.
You have to be a chemist to read a book on nutrition?


If someone is asking for nutrition information when going out to eat, cooking healthy meals, not hitting up fast food for lunch, exercising regularly (5 days a week) and is still overweight, I will have some sympathy for them. If they aren't doing those things (things everyone on the planet can do), then those steps should be taken before complaining about a 'natually heavy body type' or unfair practices by food companies.
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Old 05-11-2009, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Dorchester
2,602 posts, read 4,212,764 times
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We are overweight because we eat when we want to instead of when we need to. We also eat more than we need at any given sitting.
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