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Old 12-01-2008, 08:09 PM
 
5,273 posts, read 11,910,304 times
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I think the answer is a little of both.

I agree with leftydan6 that start-ups in the auto industry face an almost impossible task if they expect to be a 'player'. The initial outlay of money would be enormous. If they didn't get out of the gate fast and build quickly, they'd go under in less than 5 years.

On the other hand, I can envision small niche companies as offshoots from larger ones. That's possible. Like Saturn was supposed to be. They would be more nimble.
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Old 12-01-2008, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Mount Dora, FL
2,906 posts, read 2,514,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subsound View Post
Companies like these should be allowed to crumble and let new ones rise in their ashes. None have made a really quality car, in my opinion, for many years. Why should the public throw money at companies that screw around instead of doing what every other business must do?
I disagree, somewhat...I think you have to have a strong American Auto presence....I don't think you can let that Industry 'fade to black' so to speak...It is too important to the overall health of our economy...What we need is a good plan to return these organizations to profitability, with the right ideas & exec's in place to see it through, these companies can survive and be stronger than ever.
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Old 12-02-2008, 05:58 AM
 
Location: OH->FL->NJ
7,749 posts, read 7,256,814 times
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>with Chrysler being purchased out perhaps by a foreign company as the Lehman brothers were.<

Chrysler is dead. What do they have besides a few jeeps, Ram Trucks, one of the last minivans, and a few specialty cars (viper challenger etc)?

Dont laugh at Korea. Hyundais are cheap and well built (many in Alabama)

Many Japanese cars are in fact build in the US.
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Old 12-02-2008, 05:19 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
2,290 posts, read 4,947,388 times
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If you read GM and Ford's "plans" that Congress required, they both blame their problems on the so-called credit crunch. They need money to be able to lend to people who can't afford their overpriced vehicles.

Why on earth should we continue to fund an industry that works against the better interests of the country -- not the market, the country? We're overpopulated with cars and trucks whose value diminishes by 30-50% as soon as we sign the papers. Yet this industry wants billions and billions of taxpayer money to, essentially, maintain business as usual.

I say sure; let's have one auto manufacturer, partially owned by the federal government so that we the people have at least some say in what gets built; why it gets built; and how much it costs.
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Old 12-02-2008, 09:22 PM
 
5,092 posts, read 4,360,489 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ottomobeale View Post
>with Chrysler being purchased out perhaps by a foreign company as the Lehman brothers were.<

Chrysler is dead. What do they have besides a few jeeps, Ram Trucks, one of the last minivans, and a few specialty cars (viper challenger etc)?

Dont laugh at Korea. Hyundais are cheap and well built (many in Alabama)
Give Chrysler a little credit...their mini-vans have always been better than what GM or Ford have been offering.

Also, the Jeep brand has gone from Willys (1941) to Kaiser (1953) to American Motors (1970) and then to Chrysler (1987). If Chrysler dies, some else will certainly snap up the Jeep brand. There's way too many rich kids who want to drive to high school or college in a Jeep.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ottomobeale View Post
Many Japanese cars are in fact build in the US.
But most Japanese cars sold in the United States are in fact built in Japan and shipped to the United States.
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Old 12-02-2008, 09:26 PM
 
5,092 posts, read 4,360,489 times
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Originally Posted by backfist View Post
I say sure; let's have one auto manufacturer, partially owned by the federal government so that we the people have at least some say in what gets built; why it gets built; and how much it costs.
Sounds nice, but the British tried it once with British Leyland. Government consolidation and ownership pretty much killed the British domestic auto industry.
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Old 12-03-2008, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
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I've had the chance to read the "Plans" that both Ford and GM were required to prepare. Both plans were little more than PR papers. Neither of those Plans were contrite and solemn enough to indicate the reality at hand: that they were begging for taxpayer money in order to avoid bankruptcy. In fact, both Plans read as if they're merely applying for a line of credit from a bank. Basically, business as usual.

So why won't Ford, GM and Chrysler lower themselves and actually appeal to consumers for help? Because they'd have actually admit that their very business model is fatally flawed; that they can't sell a product that the per capita median income can responsibly afford. Nope, Big Auto wants taxpayer money to continue making a product that 99% of Americans cannot purchase without going into significant debt.
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Old 12-03-2008, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
2,290 posts, read 4,947,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
Sounds nice, but the British tried it once with British Leyland. Government consolidation and ownership pretty much killed the British domestic auto industry.
Ironically, the American auto industry would have killed itself, had the government not promised to keep them alive.
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