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Old 12-17-2008, 06:40 AM
 
Location: The Netherlands
8,567 posts, read 14,518,646 times
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Originally Posted by sundance67
Quote:
I used to support the high school sports programs, when I was young, dumb & naive.
The sad thing in The Netherlands is that nowadays there is a shortage of (volunteer) referees, because parents can become very fanatical when their kid's team is losing; they're willing to blame & then attack the referee.
It’s never their kid’s fault, right?
How will the kids know the difference between right and wrong if their parents already behave like this?
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Old 12-17-2008, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Between Philadelphia and Allentown, PA
5,077 posts, read 12,707,769 times
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Having raised two kids (now 20 and 18), I do think that high schools and school in general should offer competitive sports however, I do think that some of these coaches and parents get way too crazy and put way too much pressure on the kids to win. And it's the "win" not succeed that gets me. You can succeed at something and not win. I think if you have kids who are just getting to the age of competing in sports that you need to heavily consider how you are going to behave when they are out there playing.
I think parents also need to recognize when they are pushing too hard. If a kid is constantly coming home and not wanting to keep going to their event, then you should respect their wishes and let them try something different or let them stop doing it and revisit it again at a later date.
My son who was never really into sports never wanted to try anything so every now and then I'd sign him up for something and Id tell him he had to do for "x" amount of time, if at that point he still didn't like it then he could drop out.
We did that and guess what? Because I didn't pressure him like his coach would have had me do, and I let him make his own decisions, he then joined a cross country team and did that for awhile and actually liked it. He did eventually stop doing it because it was causing him a lot of pain but to date, he's still very athletic. He just wasn't into it in school. He's also very competitive and really did very little with regard to sports in school.

I did the same with my daugher allowing her to make her own choices about sports and other activities and she ended up playing basketball for four years. I never pressured her, she always knew I would support her decisions but she liked it and stayed in. To date both kids are competitive and the fact that I didn't force them into competitive sports in school has made them better people and I truly do believe that.
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Old 12-17-2008, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Charleston, WV
3,105 posts, read 6,488,984 times
Reputation: 830
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Overall, is it a good thing or a bad thing to have high school competitive sports programs?
There are too many variables to give a direct good or bad judgment -humans being the number 1 variable... in particular many coaches.

If you asked about football specifically, I would have to say overall it is a bad thing. I have seen too many high school football coaches so focused on winning the title that they lose focus, or just don't care, about the future of their players.

Too often the star players are given preferential treatment such as inflated grades (and if you don't think that happens you better are too innocent). Regardless of their grades or how much homework or tests the next day, they can't miss practice. Too many coaches teach/expect the kids to focus on football, football, football, and not on the things which will be important for their life after high school.

It is really sad to see a child who has been glorified and pampered in high school walk out into the real world to .... nothing. They don't have the grades or study skills for college and they have no training to suceed in the world.

Sometimes in high school the kids are so protected and spoiled that they get away with things regular students do not - the rules which apply to others do not apply to them. What happens then when they walk into the real world and still think the rules do not apply to them?

How sad is it for a kid who was idolized and praised to walk out of high school to ..... to what? Where are all the cheers and accolades when they don't have skills to succeed in the real world?

One can argue that not all students can do well in academics and this is the way they can shine. Well, that's just great. But what does it do for the kid after high school when the coach has only focused on the football aspect of the kid's high school life? For many of these kids, they love their coach and he is an extremely important male role model in their life.

I am NOT saying this is true for all high school football players/stars nor am I saying it is true of all coaches. However, there are far too many of them for which this is true.
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Old 12-17-2008, 07:20 AM
 
Location: In a house
5,230 posts, read 7,321,196 times
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I think the lack of competitiveness is by far the greatest contributor to the huge welfare class in America. Or young people are not taught to strive for perfection, instead theyre taught to settle for getting along.
Why should a kid work harder than someone else to excell & move up when he's been taught that beating another person is unethical?
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Old 12-17-2008, 08:19 AM
 
5,273 posts, read 11,910,304 times
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There's certainly nothing wrong with competitive high school sports. Sports teaches a lot to kids- discipline, the value of team work, builds self esteem and it may lead to a partial or full scholarship to college. It also can develop some community spirit and that's not too bad as that can spill over into other scholl functions that are not sports.
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Old 12-17-2008, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,556,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JDTD View Post
How does you being from Texas influence your opinion on high school sports?
I'm not FROM TExas. I'm retired and I'm meeting global warming halfway.
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Old 12-17-2008, 01:30 PM
 
Location: In the sticks of Illinois
498 posts, read 1,363,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Just one person's oplinion, but I once heard a doctor quoted as saying that a high school football player experiences the equivalent of an auto accident every Friday night.

Personally, of all the adults Ive ever known who needed orthopedic surgery, more than half of them were repairing high school sports damage.

The human body did not evolve to perform the operations used in most sports, such as jumping in basketbell, or throwing in baseball. Our body is prepared to do those things occasionally, but it is destructive to the physique to "play hard" frequently and over a long period of time using body parts that are not designed for that. The competitive spirit of winning instills the "play hard" drive that is abusive to the body.

"Play hard" might also be abusive to the mindset. Competitiveness is fine as one of the components of balanced human enterprise, but to instill the "win or nothing" attitude in adolescents is not conducive to a healthy society.

hello jtur88,

I couldn't agree with you more. Anytime I have ever mentioned this to anyone, they come back with, well a person could walk out into the street and get hit too. Life is too short, is what they say. I do not agree with them.
K-12 public schools are now starting to actively teaching sports at the 3rd grade. How wrong is that? Their bones and muscles are no where near done developing. THese are the adults decisions to start them this early. I have seen some of the littlest football players ever. THeir helmet is bigger than they are. What is up with that??

For as much as I enjoyed watching my child in his sports is as much as I want the sports taken out of the k-12 public schools. Some of the reason being to take a lot of the aggression out of it and put more P-L-A-Y back into it. I also know that sports are not going away in America, we just need to rearrange into our communities.

We recently lost a high school boy to a football game. His neck was broken and he was paralyzed neck down. He had some complications after about a year and passed. Very sad.

Most of the sports role models are NOT GOOD ROLE MODELS AT ALL.

"Win or Nothing" is the LOSER.

Very well said jtur88.
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Old 12-17-2008, 01:58 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,149 posts, read 18,131,294 times
Reputation: 9868
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDTD View Post
I would be seriously interested to hear why anyone would think that it wouldn't be.

It's waste of time and money better spent on academics. Academics, you know, the things we NEED schools for. Whereas kids can play sports fine all on their own without schools.
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Old 12-17-2008, 02:02 PM
 
Location: San Antonio
10,149 posts, read 18,131,294 times
Reputation: 9868
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAZER PROPHET View Post
There's certainly nothing wrong with competitive high school sports. Sports teaches a lot to kids- discipline, the value of team work, builds self esteem and it may lead to a partial or full scholarship to college. It also can develop some community spirit and that's not too bad as that can spill over into other scholl functions that are not sports.


Yeah, so of all the students in a school you have a fraction learning these virtues through sports. Better to take the money and effort from sports and find a way to teach ALL the students those virtues.

Last edited by Irishtom29; 12-17-2008 at 02:38 PM..
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Old 12-17-2008, 02:05 PM
 
5,019 posts, read 12,469,856 times
Reputation: 6952
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishtom29 View Post
It's waste of time and money better spent on academics. Academics, you know, the things we NEED schools for. Whereas kids can play sports fine all on their own without schools.
I'm voting "bad" also because of the $$$.

I'd rather see my tax dollars go for teachers, classroom supplies and school building upgrades and repairs.

Parents who wish to have their children participate is sports can pay for those activities (e.g. Little League baseball, community soccer programs) with their own money.

Please don't misunderstand. I have been a competetive athlete most of my life (running and cycling) and believe strongly in physical activity, but I don't expect taxpayers to pick up the tab for my sports.
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