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Old 04-30-2009, 12:15 AM
 
Location: vagabond
2,631 posts, read 4,831,584 times
Reputation: 1300

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here's an idea. how about we quit posturing and get back to the topic. no one really cares which one of you thinks you can pee the farthest.

there is no way that you are going to convince people that physical activity is bad because "some athletes get fat later in life," jtur. i'm not sure exactly where along that line your real intentions are, but you are flirting with it, and i have a feeling that you are doing it just for the sake of arguing.

as far as my own experience goes, i have participated in more sports that discourage weight gain than i have those that encourage "bulking up," and i doubt that i am anything but the norm. most sports don't require you to put on weight.

the article that you linked to talked about the activity levels of *ordinary* people as well as athletes, and mentioned specifically that human beings evolved to be highly physically active. our sedentary lifestyle is largely a thing of the last 100 years or so, and before that, i would be willing to bet that ex athletes were thin even in their later years, as were people in general.

an active lifestyle is very important to physical and emotional health, and the schools that are getting rid of recess, physical education, and organized sports are doing the world a large disservice. competition is also important for a healthy upbringing, but in our current society we would rather there be no competition, no chance for growth or evaluation, no chance to learn from success and failure. in fact, our formal education system is set up with the precise goal of teaching children that they cannot be wrong, that only a right answer is of any value, and that they should not ever reach beyond their comfort zones for any kind of innovation or creative thinking. might as well attach the kids to their xboxes right now since that is the lifestyle that is going to replace anything active.

schools are only a fraction of the problem though. the culpability resides with the parents that don't get their kids involved in anything worthwhile.
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Old 04-30-2009, 10:35 AM
 
536 posts, read 1,645,106 times
Reputation: 323
I can see both sides of the argument. I do agree that physical activity is important, but at the same time don't believe that sports is the answer to a healthy life. I played sports and never learned anything about eating right etc. High school sports were different but alot of them had specific diets depending on what you did. Our wrestlers had to get shredded so they dehydrated themselves. Football players had to bulk up. And back then no one knew how to bulk clean. In the end, sports teach you how to become better at sports and adjust your body to fit the role.

A healthy lifestyle should start at home in the kitchen and work its way from there. You need to change your lifestyle. Educate the kids. Throwing them into sports is not going to keep them fit and healthy without a lifestyle change at home. Ever see a 300 # jogger and wonder why he can't lose that weight? You need to diet, excercise and then maybe worry about sports.

I don't think we should eliminate sports, recess or any activites. But I do believe it should not be forced.

On the other side of the argument kids do learn competition, coordination, discipline, teamwork, and lots of other things playing sports. But at the same time they don't need sports for any of that.

I put sports into the same boat as an ab roller. Without a grasp of dieting you are getting nowhere
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Old 04-30-2009, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,538,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stycotl View Post
the culpability resides with the parents that don't get their kids involved in anything worthwhile.
It's pretty obvious, as you ratchet up the peeing contest, that you think "worthwhile" means sports.
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Old 05-01-2009, 12:10 PM
 
Location: vagabond
2,631 posts, read 4,831,584 times
Reputation: 1300
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
It's pretty obvious, as you ratchet up the peeing contest, that you think "worthwhile" means sports.
i'm not actually ratcheting anything up; i think that the debate turned from intellectual to aggravating when it seemed that it was going to devolve into a contest between physical and mental exercises, and i called you on it. i haven't chosen a side between the two of you (especially since i think that you are both right and both wrong at the same time). and we aren't even approaching the emotional or social aspects yet.

you are wrong in your "obvious" assumption that sports are what i see as worthwhile. i do think sports are worthwhile. i also think that academics are worthwhile. but i think that we handle both exercises very poorly in america. the way that formal education handles teaching, handles testing, handles sports, handles pretty much anything is ridiculous.

even more ridiculous is the sheer volume of people out there that claim that one area of activity or another is uneccessary and ought to be done away with.

i see it most often in school systems, but i know for a fact that there are families out there with equally ridiculous ideas.

families that don't value academics are going to have children that suffer because of it. there is no reason why we should be ok with our children not learning to read and write; there is no reason why it should be acceptable that our children don't know mathematics, or science, or anything else.

at the same time though, there is no reason why we should find it acceptable that children are being made to sit inside a classroom all day every day. kids are kids–they need to get outside. they need recess. they need physical activity. it promotes not only a further desire for physical activity, but many other wonderful things such as teamwork and other social skills, a comprehensive grasp of the math and sciences that they learn while in the classroom, and the ability to critically think and problem solve.

sports are in a broad sense, very important along those lines. team sports are a more narrowly defined group and are also very important.

competitive sports is another subcategory, and even competitive sports have their place in teaching kids to grow up, and that is not limited to just "learning how to deal with the nasty realities of life" as we sometimes seem to think.

competitive sports can teach kids professionalism and courtesy.

but again, they need to be handled waaaaaay better than they currently are in our society. but i tend to think the same thing about academics, formal evaluations, and the fact that our whole idea of education is to teach kids to fear stepping outside of the box and thinking for themselves.

but that is just me....

my goal with my kids is to expose them to lots of activities. outdoor recreation is a big deal to me, so they will get a more than sufficient dose of hiking, climbing, fishing, etc. but i also want my kids to at least try music, arts, sports, etc. scholastics are another issue. if my kids try music for a few months and decide that they aren't cut out for it or would rather do something else, so be it. i'm not gonna push them into hobbies. general education is another matter entirely; they are going to be proficient in reading. they are going to understand math. they are going to know the sciences. they are going to understand the humanities and the principles of creative design (whether they end up gravitating to visual art, music, dance, acting, etc). my exact plans are still in the process of being created, but those are the goals in mind.
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Old 11-04-2013, 03:25 PM
 
1,121 posts, read 541,533 times
Reputation: 1507
[quote=Pug Life;8354172][i]I was watching "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel" (great program that is surprisingly shocking every time) from last night and they had a piece on "The Wussification of America" (their words, not mine) and how schools around the country are in a movement to ban all competitive games from the playgrounds.
/I]
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Old 11-04-2013, 03:26 PM
 
1,121 posts, read 541,533 times
Reputation: 1507
[quote=mtnbkr5;32090995][quote=Pug Life;8354172][i]I was watching "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel" (great program that is surprisingly shocking every time) from last night and they had a piece on "The Wussification of America" (their words, not mine) and how schools around the country are in a movement to ban all competitive games from the playgrounds.

Wrong button.

Just wanted to say, judging from the title of the show, they picked the perfect host..........
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Old 11-06-2013, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Upstate NY
30,407 posts, read 9,086,867 times
Reputation: 28951
DH and I refer to it as something else--not "wussification," but something very similar.

It's true, too. In part, we can thank the past generation of hand-wringing women following kids around the schoolyard because Johnny's (gasp!) pulling Suzy's pigtails, girls aren't (gasp!) inviting everyone to jump rope, and boys are (gasp!) playing shoot-em-up with their fingers. The schoolyard used to be the place for kids to learn a lot about what's acceptable and not acceptable behavior on their own, without interference from busybodies.

Boys, in particular, are being emasculated and, often, by women who think that every kid who acts like Tom Sawyer should be medicated into zombieland.

Sadly, we're reaping the effects of that now.
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Old 11-09-2013, 02:15 PM
 
17,158 posts, read 22,167,733 times
Reputation: 31223
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delahanty View Post
DH and I refer to it as something else--not "wussification," but something very similar.

It's true, too. In part, we can thank the past generation of hand-wringing women following kids around the schoolyard because Johnny's (gasp!) pulling Suzy's pigtails, girls aren't (gasp!) inviting everyone to jump rope, and boys are (gasp!) playing shoot-em-up with their fingers. The schoolyard used to be the place for kids to learn a lot about what's acceptable and not acceptable behavior on their own, without interference from busybodies.

Boys, in particular, are being emasculated and, often, by women who think that every kid who acts like Tom Sawyer should be medicated into zombieland.

Sadly, we're reaping the effects of that now.
excellent post!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 11-09-2013, 02:28 PM
 
17,158 posts, read 22,167,733 times
Reputation: 31223
Quote:
Originally Posted by sike0000 View Post
I can see both sides of the argument. I do agree that physical activity is important, but at the same time don't believe that sports is the answer to a healthy life. I played sports and never learned anything about eating right etc. High school sports were different but alot of them had specific diets depending on what you did. Our wrestlers had to get shredded so they dehydrated themselves. Football players had to bulk up. And back then no one knew how to bulk clean. In the end, sports teach you how to become better at sports and adjust your body to fit the role.

A healthy lifestyle should start at home in the kitchen and work its way from there. You need to change your lifestyle. Educate the kids. Throwing them into sports is not going to keep them fit and healthy without a lifestyle change at home. Ever see a 300 # jogger and wonder why he can't lose that weight? You need to diet, excercise and then maybe worry about sports.

I don't think we should eliminate sports, recess or any activites. But I do believe it should not be forced.

On the other side of the argument kids do learn competition, coordination, discipline, teamwork, and lots of other things playing sports. But at the same time they don't need sports for any of that.

I put sports into the same boat as an ab roller. Without a grasp of dieting you are getting nowhere
start in the kitchen?? ab roller???

team sports, team spirit and team accomplishment has alot to do with high school sports,,
along with competition,,,


dont take me the wrong way-you have some good points, but you remind me of my old best friends mother- giving us broccoli and carrots for snacks-- "good for ya" she'd say,,
and my friend would smile and appease his mother, apologize for her and if he could get away from her----we'd go to mcdonalds,,and he'd be in heaven.. because she was too strict to let him eat there
we were in a few different sports- everything we ate we burned up(in high school)

in college this kid blimped right up- because he said he finally got a chance to eat foods he always wanted to, but never allowed-
he slimmed down on his own a couple years later

his kids did exceptional in school and sports,,he never held any restrictions on them,,
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Old 11-09-2013, 02:53 PM
 
5,640 posts, read 16,926,779 times
Reputation: 3963
How old is this thread??
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