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Old 06-28-2010, 07:41 PM
 
Location: California
29,610 posts, read 31,914,576 times
Reputation: 24737

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Ya, I think too much house is just a sign of something else lacking.
LOL!
I like cozy houses.

 
Old 06-29-2010, 05:37 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 40,273,555 times
Reputation: 10915
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
If you want a large yard, that is fine, but don't claim this lifestyle is for 'very few'.

That is a fairly judgmental statement. Just because it isn't your thing doesn't mean 'very few' people like it!
Seems to me that the Northeast has plenty of houses with small or no yards. People live in apartment buildings, and don't care if they don't have a yard. Less to mow.
 
Old 06-29-2010, 08:36 AM
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,637 posts, read 5,263,433 times
Reputation: 2650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoarfrost View Post
It's odd. I would say this attribute of American culture comes from the huge amount of land that was/still is available and 'Manifest Destiny', but you don't see similar attitudes in Canada, which has a large amount of inhabitable space.

Bigger houses and bigger cars very likely mean more per capita consumption leading to more per capita pollution. Bigger portions lead to...bigger people.

So yes, it actually is completely plausible.

And are we seriously even having the argument that the average American has a city as walkable as Paris? I almost coffee coated my keyboard after that one. Maybe people in New York, Boston, or San Francisco can make frequent grocery store trips, but most people have to go quite some way for that. And a ridiculously small amount can actually walk to one.
Yeah, try walking to the grocery store in rural Maine.

To each his or her own I say (as long as you can pay for it and not buy something you can't afford just to flaunt it - I don't want to have to pay for irresponsibility down the road frankly) I look at it this way: The smaller the house, the less junk gathers, the less you pay in taxes and heating for it, and as an added bonus, the less time you have to spend CLEANING it!

Last edited by cebdark; 06-29-2010 at 08:40 AM.. Reason: added
 
Old 06-29-2010, 08:50 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,015,465 times
Reputation: 5443
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
Seems to me that the Northeast has plenty of houses with small or no yards. People live in apartment buildings, and don't care if they don't have a yard. Less to mow.
Exactly...I have no grass at all, just a deck out back. There is a park two blocks from my house, so I have plenty of grass when I want it with none of the upkeep.
 
Old 06-29-2010, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 34,366,957 times
Reputation: 4893
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
Exactly...I have no grass at all, just a deck out back. There is a park two blocks from my house, so I have plenty of grass when I want it with none of the upkeep.
If more people wanted the type of housing/lots you described, then housing developers would build such communities. The fact is, there is not that much demand for such housing.

Housing projects like yours are / were a result more of smaller cities and the need to be able to service the community with fewer resources.

Mind you, I'm not criticizing your choice(s) - not at all. And choices do vary by region of the country. For instance, when someone migrates from say Chicago, where they have lived in these smaller projects, they tend to want the larger home on a larger lot so then can do what they want at home.

As an example, the weather here in the Desert SW allows for swimming a greater part of the year - hence the number of private swimming pools that homeowners may install in their back yard.

Or, they have "toys" (boats, RV's, campers) and we have quite a few homes where there is "RV" parking - lots are large enough that they can park their boat, camper etc at their home - not some storage lot.

It is simply a matter of personal preference -
 
Old 06-29-2010, 10:45 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,015,465 times
Reputation: 5443
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
If more people wanted the type of housing/lots you described, then housing developers would build such communities. The fact is, there is not that much demand for such housing.

Housing projects like yours are / were a result more of smaller cities and the need to be able to service the community with fewer resources.

Mind you, I'm not criticizing your choice(s) - not at all. And choices do vary by region of the country. For instance, when someone migrates from say Chicago, where they have lived in these smaller projects, they tend to want the larger home on a larger lot so then can do what they want at home.

As an example, the weather here in the Desert SW allows for swimming a greater part of the year - hence the number of private swimming pools that homeowners may install in their back yard.

Or, they have "toys" (boats, RV's, campers) and we have quite a few homes where there is "RV" parking - lots are large enough that they can park their boat, camper etc at their home - not some storage lot.

It is simply a matter of personal preference -
I think it largely depends on area. You live out west, where space isn't a highly prized commodity. Here in the east many new communities are rowhome style with a public park/playground. I also think the rowhome/urban style is growing in appeal amongst 20-somethings as they realize the growing energy crisis. The option to live carless (or even to have a single car family) is something that is becoming more and more attractive as time goes on. I know around here at least rentals are growing in interest (zipcars instead of a two car household, renting an RV as opposed to owning, etc)

But again - it does come down to personal preference. I know I feel very differently than many people. I would go crazy if I lived somewhere where I couldn't walk two blocks to a local bakery for example...

An interesting trend to pay attention to is that of younger people favoring metropolitan areas as opposed to rural/suburban (Young, Single College Grads Moving to Cities, Census Says)

From what I have been reading on this subject over the last few years, the new 'American Dream' (for generation Y and younger) is not a suburban house with a white picket fence, but it is a walkable, light-urban area where a family can sustainably live with one car. It isn't quite as urban as where I live, but the trend amongst younger demographics seems to be leaning towards metropolitan.

There is no right or wrong answer, it is simply an interesting topic to discuss.
 
Old 06-29-2010, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 34,366,957 times
Reputation: 4893
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
I think it largely depends on area. You live out west, where space isn't a highly prized commodity. Here in the east many new communities are rowhome style with a public park/playground. I also think the rowhome/urban style is growing in appeal amongst 20-somethings as they realize the growing energy crisis. The option to live carless (or even to have a single car family) is something that is becoming more and more attractive as time goes on. I know around here at least rentals are growing in interest (zipcars instead of a two car household, renting an RV as opposed to owning, etc)
As an aside, what is growing in popularity here is the Single Family Residence (SFO) with a 3 or 4 car garage. The so called "Zip" car is not on anyones radar screen here.
 
Old 06-29-2010, 11:31 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,581 posts, read 51,786,623 times
Reputation: 83007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
If more people wanted the type of housing/lots you described, then housing developers would build such communities. The fact is, there is not that much demand for such housing.

Housing projects like yours are / were a result more of smaller cities and the need to be able to service the community with fewer resources.

-
"Zero-lot line homes, with their limited yards and increased focus on living space, are zeroing in on a community near you, if they're not there already.
With the supply of single-family urban lots dwindling across the country, and the growing number of baby boom empty nesters seeking to simplify their lives, the traditional big yard is becoming a thing of the past for many Americans.
The choice of floor plans seems to be growing almost daily, says Walt Raczkowski, owner of Coolhouseplans.com, a home-design Web service. Currently, there are now about 800 different designs of narrow homes of less than 30 feet in width on the site, which has a total of 13,000 plans.
"The narrow-lot designs are selling better and better," he said. "They are especially popular around coastal communities where land is at a premium."
Added Conner: "More people in general are being drawn to these homes because they are valuing their free time, since they seem to have so much less of it these days."
Is a zero-lot line house for you?
There must be some demand, even in bigger cities and the homes are not even that cheap...
Dallas zero lot line home - Trovit Homes Dallas,TX
FSBO Homes For Sale in Tennessee @ For Sale By Owner.com Germantown, TN
Scott Nelson Construction, Inc. Mahomet, IL
Albuquerque Homes for Sale | Albuquerque Real Estate Listings Albuquerque,AZ
and many more
 
Old 06-29-2010, 11:31 AM
 
9,856 posts, read 13,015,465 times
Reputation: 5443
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
As an aside, what is growing in popularity here is the Single Family Residence (SFO) with a 3 or 4 car garage. The so called "Zip" car is not on anyones radar screen here.
Zipcars is a car rental company where you can rent by the hour/day.

Car Sharing, an alternative to car rental and car ownership – Zipcar

For city dwellers, it can be significantly cheaper than owning.
 
Old 06-29-2010, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 34,366,957 times
Reputation: 4893
Quote:
Originally Posted by hnsq View Post
Zipcars is a car rental company where you can rent by the hour/day.

Car Sharing, an alternative to car rental and car ownership – Zipcar

For city dwellers, it can be significantly cheaper than owning.

I know what zipcars are (the company). I'm saying that here in this region, they are not popular even with 'city dwellers" inasmuch as those city dwellers have their own car / cars in their garages. Generally speaking (with a few exceptions), homes here have off street parking usually including a car port or garage.

As I noted, homes with 3 or 4 car garages are becoming increasingly popular.
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