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Old 05-02-2009, 10:37 PM
 
339 posts, read 627,251 times
Reputation: 167

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Quote:
Originally Posted by runrgirl View Post
No!!! HELL NO!!!! I do not trust the police nor do I trust or have any faith in anyone (lawyers, judges) involved in our legal system. I'd have more faith in someone put away in prison than any of the people who put them there which is where the majority of police, lawyers and judges need to be anyway, all of the ones I've dealt with before anyway. The ones I have had experience with are nothing but liars, cheats and scum of the earth and put people away who are far more upstanding citizens than themselves just to make $$$$$$$. I'm sure there are a few good ones out there that try to be honest and do the job. I apologize to them but I am just being honest about personal experience and how it has formed my opinions.
How does putting someone away make any of the aforementioned money? You don't get bonuses for "putting people away". I don't get it.

Last edited by JDTD; 05-02-2009 at 10:55 PM..

 
Old 05-02-2009, 10:54 PM
 
339 posts, read 627,251 times
Reputation: 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachertype View Post
A person becomes a police officer for the power trip.

Usually, they were the lowest tier students, aren't that capable academically, and couldn't learn a legitimate trade or skill. Authoritarian types easily impressed by a goofy looking polyester uniform, not much in the creative thinking department so don't get bored when standing out in the rain, snow, and hot sun at a construction site or busy intersection. Not bothered by bullying, racism, or trampling people's rights in general.

I greatly prefer police to firefighters though. Police tend to be more stable psychologically, at least to the extent of being responsible about carrying a gun and using deadly force, with rare exceptions. Most police are liars and reasonably intelligent. Firemen are like dumb kids that never grew up beyond wanting to ride the big red truck. It doesn't take much for brains to hold a hose but they all think they're our heroes. Laughable. Firemen are way more racist than the police. Most of the firemen in my town are head cases.
Is that a generalization from someone who obviously fancies themselves an educated person? I sense psychologist/psychiatrist. Is that a hard or soft science? I forget . Oh well...nevermind that.

I thought most did it because they wanted to help people??? I have yet to hear a cop say..."Got my badge. Got my gun. Now let's Fu** with somebody." This is actually a very funny post though for another reason. We just found the one person on in the United States who likes cops more than firefighters.

As far as intelligence/education goes...I know cops who have Phd's and a lot that have Master's Degrees (and not just in Criminal Justice). Most I know have at least a Bachelor's Degree. Not that it matters...a person can have multiple Phd's and still be an idiot as far as I'm concerned. The smartest person I knew flunked out of school, because he was bored. I also know attorneys and engineers, etc. who became cops, and I find it funny that many defense attorneys use retired apparent mentally challenged individuals as expert witnesses due to their education and training. Which is another point...I don't know any defense attorneys that hate and don't trust cops as much as some of the people on this forum do. I'm sure it's probably because, according to some people they're all in on it together. Shhhhhhhhhhhhh! Don't tell anyone.

Gotta go...I see big red truck with pretty lights on top going by...

Last edited by JDTD; 05-02-2009 at 11:14 PM..
 
Old 05-03-2009, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,538,289 times
Reputation: 35864
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDTD View Post
How does putting someone away make any of the aforementioned money? You don't get bonuses for "putting people away". I don't get it.
Cops on traffic patrol who issue tickets get paid overtime if the ticket is contested in court, because the officer is required to appear. Every cop who issues a ticket emphasizes to the driver his right to contest the ticket in traffic court---hoping that he will. Even if they're not on OT, they don't have to be out on the beat during that couple of hours, and might even be excused pro-rata from their quota.
 
Old 05-03-2009, 12:14 PM
 
3,566 posts, read 4,490,175 times
Reputation: 1846
I don't believe that the police go in and say the I got a gun and a badge thing. I think that there is more than salary at stake. If you work in an environment that actually admitting that you have been emotionally impacted by an incident makes you "weak" you will not have the support that you need. I think that is crucial. I know cops that also have Phd's but you know what? They suffer from burn out just the same.




One of the items that causes distrust is the Reid Interrogation Method. You can't tell me its not a problem. There is no way around that puppy.
 
Old 05-03-2009, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,538,289 times
Reputation: 35864
The Reid Interrogation Method: (From Wikipedia)

* Step 1 - Direct Confrontation. Lead the suspect to understand that the evidence has led the police to the individual as a suspect. Offer the person an early opportunity to explain why the offence took place.

* Step 2 - Try to shift the blame away from the suspect to some other person or set of circumstances that prompted the suspect to commit the crime. That is, develop themes containing reasons that will justify or excuse the crime. Themes may be developed or changed to find one to which the accused is most responsive.

* Step 3 - Never allow the suspect to deny guilt. Reid training video: "If you’ve let him talk and say the words ‘I didn’t do it’, and the more often a person says ‘I didn’t do it’, the more difficult it is to get a confession."

* Step 4 - At this point, the accused will often give a reason why he or she did not or could not commit the crime. Try to use this to move towards the confession.

* Step 5 - Reinforce sincerity to ensure that the suspect is receptive.

* Step 6 - The suspect will become quieter and listen. Move the theme discussion towards offering alternatives. If the suspect cries at this point, infer guilt.

* Step 7 - Pose the “alternative question”, giving two choices for what happened; one more socially acceptable than the other. The suspect is expected to choose the easier option but whichever alternative the suspect chooses, guilt is admitted.

* Step 8 - Lead the suspect to repeat the admission of guilt in front of witnesses.

* Step 9 - Document the suspect's admission and have him or her sign a confession.
 
Old 05-03-2009, 01:39 PM
 
8,973 posts, read 14,612,395 times
Reputation: 2983
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
The Reid Interrogation Method: (From Wikipedia)

* Step 1 - Direct Confrontation. Lead the suspect to understand that the evidence has led the police to the individual as a suspect. Offer the person an early opportunity to explain why the offence took place.

* Step 2 - Try to shift the blame away from the suspect to some other person or set of circumstances that prompted the suspect to commit the crime. That is, develop themes containing reasons that will justify or excuse the crime. Themes may be developed or changed to find one to which the accused is most responsive.

* Step 3 - Never allow the suspect to deny guilt. Reid training video: "If you’ve let him talk and say the words ‘I didn’t do it’, and the more often a person says ‘I didn’t do it’, the more difficult it is to get a confession."

* Step 4 - At this point, the accused will often give a reason why he or she did not or could not commit the crime. Try to use this to move towards the confession.

* Step 5 - Reinforce sincerity to ensure that the suspect is receptive.

* Step 6 - The suspect will become quieter and listen. Move the theme discussion towards offering alternatives. If the suspect cries at this point, infer guilt.

* Step 7 - Pose the “alternative question”, giving two choices for what happened; one more socially acceptable than the other. The suspect is expected to choose the easier option but whichever alternative the suspect chooses, guilt is admitted.

* Step 8 - Lead the suspect to repeat the admission of guilt in front of witnesses.

* Step 9 - Document the suspect's admission and have him or her sign a confession.
From my 10 years as a letter carrier long ago, THIS sounds pretty much like a training manual for junior-level Post Office management....
 
Old 05-03-2009, 01:54 PM
 
370 posts, read 884,789 times
Reputation: 659
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDTD View Post
How does putting someone away make any of the aforementioned money? You don't get bonuses for "putting people away". I don't get it.
They make money in several ways:
The more they run you through the system the more court, lawyer, etc fees there are, each state prison gets so much money from the government per each inmate they have, the prison phone system and commissary rape family over the coals for phone calls and goods ( 600 month average phone for daily call and more for commissary (80$ for sneakers for example). Prisoners on work program are cheap slave labor for fixing roads, etc. Believe me they MAKE money on prisoners. There is a lot of stuff the general public does not know. The legal system wants to keep you brainwashed on their own money making tactics.
 
Old 05-03-2009, 03:03 PM
 
339 posts, read 627,251 times
Reputation: 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by runrgirl View Post
They make money in several ways:
The more they run you through the system the more court, lawyer, etc fees there are, each state prison gets so much money from the government per each inmate they have, the prison phone system and commissary rape family over the coals for phone calls and goods ( 600 month average phone for daily call and more for commissary (80$ for sneakers for example). Prisoners on work program are cheap slave labor for fixing roads, etc. Believe me they MAKE money on prisoners. There is a lot of stuff the general public does not know. The legal system wants to keep you brainwashed on their own money making tactics.
That's why they are letting people out early due to the economy?
 
Old 05-03-2009, 04:05 PM
 
339 posts, read 627,251 times
Reputation: 167
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandamonium View Post
I don't believe that the police go in and say the I got a gun and a badge thing. I think that there is more than salary at stake. If you work in an environment that actually admitting that you have been emotionally impacted by an incident makes you "weak" you will not have the support that you need. I think that is crucial. I know cops that also have Phd's but you know what? They suffer from burn out just the same.




One of the items that causes distrust is the Reid Interrogation Method. You can't tell me its not a problem. There is no way around that puppy.
Sure there's a way around anything to do with confessions. Don't rely on a confession alone. All confessions have to be corroborated. A person isn't going to be convicted (shouldn't be or there's something wrong) on their confession alone. People confess to crimes (on purpose) all the time that they didn't commit. There were a whole bunch of famous serial killers who weren't even in the area the person was killed during the time if ya know what I mean. All the studies on false confession are a bunch of b.s. simply for the fact that they are confusing/likening mistakes that could happen (the alt key study for example) with convincing someone that they robbed a mini-mart (or whatever the crime may be) when they weren't even in the same town at the time. Most are completely stupid studies done by people with several Phd's who have absolutely no common sense. The alt key study scenario could happen (accidentally hit the key while typing...no $hi*...that's the scenario), there is no "punishment" and the people being studied are like "who cares". Really...who gives a cra* if someone accuses you of accidentally hitting a button when you were typing and really actually could have hit it. I'd probably even be like..."Okay dude. I hit it. Can I go back to class now?" Dumb! That being said...much of the issues surrounding any interrogation could be put to rest if they were audio-video taped.

There HAVE been false confessions (obviously). I'm not saying that there hasn't been. It's not the confession though as much as it is the overall investigation and/or several levels of flaws in the system. Essentially, a person can get convicted on a false confession if the place where they confess employs idiots as cops and the system in that area is a seven-layed dip of stupidity. There are numerous examples of what not to do out there, and these didn't follow Reid. Reid in no way says to lead people, etc. Now...If the cop sits there and says, "You drove there in a 72' Camaro, killed him with that 7 inch butcher knife that had a wooden handle in the kitchen near the back door and wrote "Bob sucks" on the wall in blood from the poodle you also killed...Didn't ya!" that would be dumb! There's a whole lot of details that can be used to corroborate that story. There is no way they are going to confess and use all those details if they weren't guilty. If it's fed to them (like some of the examples of what not to do), that's just dumb! That's not Reid though.

Seriously though. How do you suggest you interview/interrogate people? "Did you do it." "No." "Okay then...I guess we're done here. You can leave now."
 
Old 05-03-2009, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,538,289 times
Reputation: 35864
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDTD View Post

Seriously though. How do you suggest you interview/interrogate people? "Did you do it." "No." "Okay then...I guess we're done here. You can leave now."
Have you ever heard of due process? "OK then, You can leave now, until we find sufficient evidence upon which to base your arrest and formal charges."

Or would you prefer "OK, thenl we're done here. In the room down the hall, there is a man waiting with a pair of pliers. Go in there and lay your hands flat on the table, please".

Long ago and far away, there used to be a document that said this:

nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself,

Last edited by jtur88; 05-03-2009 at 04:22 PM..
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