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Old 04-28-2009, 02:05 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
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In my opinion genius is the ability to apply what you know/what you've learned better than everyone else.

The people who just think, learn and spout are good Jeopady contestants and Trivial Pursuit partners...and that's about it
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Old 04-28-2009, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
In my opinion genius is the ability to apply what you know/what you've learned better than everyone else.
No, a knowledge base still has to be there. Ive known some pretty unintelligent people, who are still good at that whey do.
The strategy of the standardized IQ test is to formulate questions whose answers cannot be known in advance, but only derived from some provided facts. The high-IQ person is good at taking a fact, and quickly and accurately converting it into a new one, ready for use. The presumption is that if you can do that with a block in your hand, you can also do it with a medical analysis.

A high IQ, hence "intelligent" person, can quickly gather data when it is presented, and then quickly draw conclusions from it. In other words, absorb a foundation of knowledge and apply it to form new knowledge.
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Old 04-28-2009, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Bettendorf, Iowa
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I've known a couple of certified genius and they were both painfully shy, no eye contact type of dudes. I imagine their gift was recognized early and they were pushed hard into the academic side of school and not the social side...poor smart bastards.
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Old 04-28-2009, 09:59 AM
 
Location: San Diego
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
I know its every rare and even more so than thought after seeing a documentary on so called gifted children.
I went to an elementary school for gifted children which required a 130 IQ just for the chance to be considered for acceptance. There were so many socially awkward kids there that only a few members of my class were ever able to really form a social circle outside of the weird geniuses of my elementary school. That being said, there was not a single kid who would not qualify as a genius.

The dumbest kid in my class was hardly dumb. He has a Masters in Meteorology and is a phenomenal songwriter who has written dozens of songs, many of which have been performed in front of hundreds of approving people.

There were 33 kids in my class. Every one of them accomplished something special at some point, though about 5-10 of them have had serious drug/alcohol problems. One kid was on Apple's payroll as a consultant in 5th grade, he made $40,000. One kid developed an operating system in 4th grade, but he eventually fell victim to drugs and was homeless for a while. One went to MIT and has developed multiple new medicines. One was Miss Massachusetts (though I had no idea she'd grow up to be hot) AND an MIT graduate! One is a nationally reknown guitarist. The list goes on and on.

These kids were said to be "gifted" at the age of 4 in many cases, which either says something about how good the school was, or maybe genius is something truly innate. As a 4 year old, I could already do the multiplication tables in my head and was able to calculate batting averages by the time I was 6. Some kids have more natural ability than others, just like how some athletes are simply stronger or faster, it's just how they are built. I may be able to calculate a batting average to within .001 in my head, but I certainly couldn't draw a realistic picture of Jesus on someone's chest (a tattoo)...there are many kinds of genius. Intellectual genius is relatively easy to measure through testing. Artistic, creative and other kinds of genius are much more difficult.
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Old 04-28-2009, 10:20 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,574,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dport7476 View Post
I've known a couple of certified genius and they were both painfully shy, no eye contact type of dudes. I imagine their gift was recognized early and they were pushed hard into the academic side of school and not the social side...poor smart bastards.
They might have been High-function Autistic, as in Aspergers Syndrome. Neural wiring follows a different schematic, favoring the analytical at the expense of the social.
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Old 04-28-2009, 11:16 AM
 
Location: vagabond
2,631 posts, read 4,832,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
No, a knowledge base still has to be there. Ive known some pretty unintelligent people, who are still good at that whey do.
The strategy of the standardized IQ test is to formulate questions whose answers cannot be known in advance, but only derived from some provided facts. The high-IQ person is good at taking a fact, and quickly and accurately converting it into a new one, ready for use. The presumption is that if you can do that with a block in your hand, you can also do it with a medical analysis.

A high IQ, hence "intelligent" person, can quickly gather data when it is presented, and then quickly draw conclusions from it. In other words, absorb a foundation of knowledge and apply it to form new knowledge.
notice that laura said that this was her opinion. kinda makes it irrefutable.

i actually like what she said.

Quote:
In my opinion genius is the ability to apply what you know/what you've learned better than everyone else.
if we can consider a mathematical prodigy a genius even though he can't tie his own shoes, why can't we consider the master carpenter that can work wonders with any kind of wood, even though he might never have scored well on a standardized test, and probably couldn't solve the riddle about the blocks on the iq test?

i think that genius is about more than how fast or clever your mind works. i think that it really does come down to application in many cases.

over all, i think that it means that our definitions of 'genius' is a bit subjective....

aaron out.
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Old 04-28-2009, 11:24 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,574,557 times
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I mostly disagreed with Laura in that in my definition, a certain threshold amount of broad knowledge was a prerequisite. upon which genius could be built. To be a genius, one would first have to become conversant with a fairly broad swath of the information base already held by one's culture. Knowing what prior great thinkers knew, without having to reinvent the wheel.

To say an unschooled woodworker can be a genius opens the door to admitting all the idiot savants.

While it is fair to applaud the "genius" of a person who has only mechanical or artistic skill, nevertheless the general perception of a "genius" is a person who's talents are chiefly manifested in intellectual activities.
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Old 04-28-2009, 11:45 AM
 
943 posts, read 2,707,182 times
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Every time someone talks about someone being a genius they also say the person has no social skills and are odd. Do you know anyone with a super high IQ who is also great in their social skills and works well with others?
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Old 04-28-2009, 12:44 PM
 
Location: San Diego
2,518 posts, read 1,845,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weekend Traveler View Post
Every time someone talks about someone being a genius they also say the person has no social skills and are odd. Do you know anyone with a super high IQ who is also great in their social skills and works well with others?
Yeah, me.

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Old 04-28-2009, 01:09 PM
 
71 posts, read 146,021 times
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I do not believe that intelligence is innate. If intelligence were innate, it would mean that people are capable reaching their full potential regardless of environment. This is never the case. Everyone who has ever been considered intelligent has been influenced at least partially by their environment.

The nature vs. nurture debate has concluded that environment can effect innate ability and that even DNA can be altered by its environment. So it is impossible to determine if anything is truly innate.
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