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Old 06-11-2009, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Redford MI
72 posts, read 238,065 times
Reputation: 31

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I am so sorry to hear about your dangerous situation, Moonshadow. I can completely sympathize. You can't help but feel for these poor souls who, in REALity, are a danger to themselves as well as others. The residents next to us are sent out into the front yard to "vent" so that they will not act out inside the home and break things. The problem with this is that they are not supervised when this is happening. They (the staff) close all the blinds and lock the doors until they stop screaming and pounding on the front door. It can be absolutely terrifying. To me, this is VERY REAL. Dcashley, I wonder how you would react if a group home moved in next to you. I think you would then see how real it can be living next to a bunch of violent, large, unsupervised, mentally ill men. What if one of these guys attacked one of your kids who were simply enjoying a birthday party? What if your home was set on fire while you and your family slept? Are these things not real enough for you? Are you seriously saying that these problems we face are unworthy of mention? Maybe you, yourself, should have to be supervised...
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Old 06-11-2009, 06:16 PM
 
Location: The Midst of Insanity
3,225 posts, read 6,123,192 times
Reputation: 3209
My sympathies with both jenijoy and moonshadow.

I attend a university, and the city it's located in is notorious for it's aggressive homeless population. Many of these people are of the institutionalization era. I have been followed and harrassed on numerous occassions to class. Other students have also been harrassed, some have been attacked, and one was lurking on campus for while grabbing woman and molesting them. Thankfully the police caught him, though I'm sure he'll be out in the streets within a few months. This past year, many break-ins and robberies in the dorms were connected to another mentally ill homeless man. So yes, the dangers posed can and often are very very real.

I have a schizophrenic in my family so it isn't as if I'm not unsympathetic or uncaring to mental illness and the havoc it wreaks. I'm all too familiar with that. But the question posed earlier remains-just what do we do with these people?

I personally think institutionalization is good for many, but it would need to be managed in a more effective way than it used to be-in a nutshell.
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Old 06-12-2009, 06:25 PM
 
9,912 posts, read 12,183,162 times
Reputation: 7257
Quote:
Originally Posted by jenijoy View Post
I am so sorry to hear about your dangerous situation, Moonshadow. I can completely sympathize. You can't help but feel for these poor souls who, in REALity, are a danger to themselves as well as others. The residents next to us are sent out into the front yard to "vent" so that they will not act out inside the home and break things. The problem with this is that they are not supervised when this is happening. They (the staff) close all the blinds and lock the doors until they stop screaming and pounding on the front door. It can be absolutely terrifying. To me, this is VERY REAL....
Yes, I completely understand your concerns. Your posts have very much resonated with me and I identified with them simply because I have experienced similar here AND feel the same way that you do. I do feel for the guy up the street. He really needs help, not the kind that anybody here in the neighbourhood can give him either. It must be like living with a time bomb for you, never knowing what will happen next. And how ludicrous the only option people have is to call the police, barricade themselves in their homes and hope that things will just simmer down without too much incident. It's no way to live for ANYONE in the situation, NOR do we need for our emergency services to be constantly called out to rectify the problem at hand when we all know that once they've calmed the person down, and maybe charged them, they then have to release them KNOWING that now not only are they mentally unstable but their also cranky with their neighbours for calling the police.
I don't want to see anyone with a disability or mental illness rounded up and routinely institutionalized BUT I don't need to live my life feeling that I've been locked in the institution either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by annika08 View Post
My sympathies with both jenijoy and moonshadow.

I attend a university, and the city it's located in is notorious for it's aggressive homeless population. Many of these people are of the institutionalization era. I have been followed and harrassed on numerous occassions to class. Other students have also been harrassed, some have been attacked, and one was lurking on campus for while grabbing woman and molesting them. Thankfully the police caught him, though I'm sure he'll be out in the streets within a few months. This past year, many break-ins and robberies in the dorms were connected to another mentally ill homeless man. So yes, the dangers posed can and often are very very real.
Uggh! That sounds awful too annika!

Quote:
Originally Posted by annika08 View Post
I have a schizophrenic in my family so it isn't as if I'm not unsympathetic or uncaring to mental illness and the havoc it wreaks. I'm all too familiar with that. But the question posed earlier remains-just what do we do with these people?
Same here in that I currently have a severely disabled family member who the powers that be would like for us to institutionalize permanently despite the fact that we seem to run into all kinds of problems and issues with the part time "care" she's currently receiving. AND I also had a family member institutionalized AND given shock treatment back in the day for what would now be diagnosed and treated as postpartum depression.
I really think it doesn't help that seemingly those who are "in charge" appear to have arrived at these set-in-concrete procedures without much consultation with family, neighbourhoods (like in the case of group homes) police and emergency services AND indeed with the person with the health issue themselves.

Quote:
Originally Posted by annika08 View Post
I personally think institutionalization is good for many, but it would need to be managed in a more effective way than it used to be-in a nutshell.
I agree completely and would also add that perhaps the procedures and criteria for deinstitutionalization also needs to be more effective AND better managed.
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Old 06-12-2009, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
7,091 posts, read 10,487,344 times
Reputation: 4104
I think there has been a failure for those who are a danger to others, but not really mentally competent enough to be a criminal. Once you become a danger to others, you rights to be free to hurt those people should be limited...for those who are competent enough to know better there's prison, but no real place for those who aren't.

Being in the medical area, and at a facility with an inpatient locked psychiatric ward, it amazes me who they release into the world after the 72 hour hold. One woman broke into a car in order to run down people who wronged Jesus till she was martyred, but she had no idea how to hot wire it when she got in. No real followup, certainly not competent to stand trial, so she was just released after a few weeks (a bit longer since she was really delusional) instructed to return for medication management. Another assaulted the driver of the commuter bus I take, and there was an officer nearby who promptly arrested her (after tasing her a few times because she was fighting like a wild animal)...she was let out a few days later, a bit mellower at the start from meds but she was standing and cursing the roof of the bus again a few weeks after.

I think something should be done, they were way too permissive at the start and there's nothing now. I say this knowing it first hand, knowing family members and friends who are mentally ill...some enough to be a danger. People who have an illness and refuse treatment, I've completely cut out of my life. There are some that if come to my home bleeding I would call 911 and just go back inside, because I don't want to be involved.
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