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Old 06-02-2009, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
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No, Catholic Priests should not be able to marry.
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Old 06-02-2009, 09:09 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
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Well, I’m not Catholic, so it’s none of my business.

But I would like to comment on this question as it applies to religion in general. If I were in a church that commonly made choices based on member ‘votes,’ I would immediately renounce my membership.

Why? Well, I’m assuming that if I am in that church, I believe in that church’s version of God. I believe that God is being worshipped and that the church is following the teachings of that God. When I accepted membership into that church, I acknowledged that the policies, views, and ‘laws’ of that Church are the laws of God (I’m assuming that if I did not accept them, I wouldn’t have joined the church in the first place). If I then see my church changing rules based on popular vote, I can no longer assume that I am in a church that believes in the laws of what I had previously accepted as the word of God. Unless God comes down and changes something or gives some sort of ‘vision’ to the church members, I assume they are invariable until further divine notice.

Now if it’s just a social club, that’s different. I think we have a whole bunch of social clubs.
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Old 06-03-2009, 01:52 PM
ECG
 
Location: In the minds of others
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coolhand68 View Post
It has nothing to do with religion. It's all about money. The Catholic church does not want to pay for the expense of families. At least that's how it was explained to me by a priest I new.
That is exactly correct....That is the same explanation I got.
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Old 06-03-2009, 01:54 PM
ECG
 
Location: In the minds of others
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njsocks View Post
I am Catholic for the last 44 years of living! I am starting to think the priests should be able to marry within the church. Every other denomination is able to get married...... How can they preach about marriage/sex etc...when they took a vow of celibacy .......etc.....

What do you think?

I definitely think they should be allowed to!
I feel they should be allowed to get married.
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Old 06-03-2009, 07:22 PM
 
28,906 posts, read 45,194,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
I'm Baptist and my wife is Catholic. We were married in the Catholic church and went through all of the Catholic pre-marriage infrastructure. I found it odd that a man who can not marry a woman or father children is expected to counsel men and women in their marriage and in parenthood. Color me protestant, but I feel that a pastor has more credibility; he probably well understands any problem for which you seek his counsel and he can advise you from experience, not just theory and faith.

I have enormous respect for someone who feels a calling so deeply to make the choice to become a priest, but I don't think any man or woman should have to choose between a family and a life in the clergy.
Well, I have to agree with you. The church's position is inconsistent with both scripture (For example, Paul's letter to Timothy where he clearly states that both bishops and deacons may have wives. I mean, who is going to dispute Paul on this?) and its own history. After all, priestly marriages weren't outlawed until two lateran councils in the 12th Century decided the issue. Before then, a substantial number of the priests were evidently married, including 39 popes.

The other argument is that celibacy allows the priest to devote his time fully to the needs of the parishioner. Fair enough, but the problems with that theory become evident very quickly. For with a very small percentage of candidates actually willing to undertake celibacy what you have are a very small number of priests attempting to serve a very large flock, to the point that all the priest has time to do is marry, bury, baptize and preside over mass. As for the fact that a Catholic priest currently only holds theoretical knowledge of family, marriage, and sex speaks for itself.

My wife, a former Catholic from a devout family, was astonished at the depth of involvement on the part of clergy in Christian education and service in my church. So really what happens is that the congregations are more poorly served due to celibacy and the manifest shortage of priests. After all, some 16% of U.S. parishes are without a priest today, and the situation is evidently worse overseas--a worrisome development that will only get worse as an aging clergy begins to retire or die at their posts with no one to replace them.

What's more, I note that the Catholic Church has no compunction in allowing more than 100 former Episcopal priests and other Protestant clergy to convert and serve in the priesthood while married--in all that entails. So the Catholic Church is already conceding the obvious in this country, that married priests are fit to serve.
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Old 06-04-2009, 08:53 AM
 
5,273 posts, read 6,394,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
I'm Baptist and my wife is Catholic. We were married in the Catholic church and went through all of the Catholic pre-marriage infrastructure. I found it odd that a man who can not marry a woman or father children is expected to counsel men and women in their marriage and in parenthood. Color me protestant, but I feel that a pastor has more credibility; he probably well understands any problem for which you seek his counsel and he can advise you from experience, not just theory and faith.

I have enormous respect for someone who feels a calling so deeply to make the choice to become a priest, but I don't think any man or woman should have to choose between a family and a life in the clergy.

GREAT POST Jim! Exactly. What DO they know for parenting/marriage if they have no EXPERIENCE with it!!

And I didn't know there was a religion thread! Mods move if you need to!

Quote:
My wife, a former Catholic from a devout family, was astonished at the depth of involvement on the part of clergy in Christian education and service in my church. So really what happens is that the congregations are more poorly served due to celibacy and the manifest shortage of priests. After all, some 16% of U.S. parishes are without a priest today, and the situation is evidently worse overseas--a worrisome development that will only get worse as an aging clergy begins to retire or die at their posts with no one to replace them.
Hi CPG!! Exactly! There is such a shortage of priests! Are there any NUNS left seriously????
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Old 06-04-2009, 09:02 AM
 
28,906 posts, read 45,194,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njsocks View Post
GREAT POST Jim! Exactly. What DO they know for parenting/marriage if they have no EXPERIENCE with it!!

And I didn't know there was a religion thread! Mods move if you need to!


Hi CPG!! Exactly! There is such a shortage of priests! Are there any NUNS left seriously????
At my children's parochial schools, there were a dozen Dominican sisters. I liked them well enough, but it was always interesting to have conversations with them about our lives outside of school. While they would stroll back to the cloister at 3:10 and play Monopoly while watching baseball or wrestling (Yes, that's what one sister said. To be honest, I think it's a very charming picture), I would begin to relate a life filled with soccer practices, violin practice, work, home maintenance, homework, etc. etc. etc. They could never even begin to identify with the lives the parents led.
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Old 06-04-2009, 09:10 AM
 
16,700 posts, read 18,909,509 times
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The catholic church has been pretty much the same... I am on the fence with this one... I see the church as a "religious institution" and to keep mentally as a religious institution, I think there SHOULD be sacrifices otherwise it isn't really a religious institution, it becomes a business model... Anyone can believe in God, only few would sacrifice much to worship him (priests)... If a priest gets married, it pretty much is an employee who does whatever is necessary to get a paycheck... it transforms the catholic institution into a business model... BUT to me, the catholic institution has always been a business (albeit a tax exempt business) who has profited a HUGE amount of money... so if its really just a business in disguise, why shouldn't priests be allowed to marry? Part of me wants to retain the "religious" aspect of the faith (even though I consider myself an atheist) but the reality of the situation is that it will always be a business model... so I guess I lean towards allowing priests to marry....
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Old 06-05-2009, 05:02 PM
 
Location: nc
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I don't go to church anymore but I think they should definitely be allowed to get married. I know it happens in a lot of churches, not just the Catholic church, but if they could I think it would definitely help with the abuse issues. I guess the Catholic church gets it even worse though being the largest form of Christianity so it's bound to have more cases. If they really are worried about money and that's the issue, just go ahead and put a woman behind the alter, can't imagine the crowds of people that would come in to see a woman conducting a Catholic mass, thus leading to more offerings. I'd go then. Statistically (skewed or not) women are more interested in church than men anyways. As for pre-cana, deacons can do it as well, not just priests. Deacons are allowed to be married. I agree though, it is sad to think someone would have to choose between a family and a clergy life. One benefit I've heard of priests not being married though is that they have more time to deal with their flock.
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Old 06-06-2009, 01:25 AM
 
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Dual track it like the Eastern rites do. Run o' the mill parish priests marry (once only, please) and the special order of monks and brothers don't.
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