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Old 07-01-2009, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,538,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newenglandgirl View Post
It's all in what you can comfortably afford~~~
The whole topic here is the difference between what you think you can comfortably afford today, and what you can afford a year or two from now. I know quite a few people who thought they could comfortably afford lots of things, and now they have found out they were wrong.
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Old 07-02-2009, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,680 posts, read 4,457,986 times
Reputation: 3622
As has been discussed by others, this totally depends on what your standard of living is. Some people live well within their means, even with lower pay, and I seriously doubt they will see any change in their standard of living. For those living above their means, or those who earned way more than they maybe realistically should have in "fluff" jobs that have gone away, sure they will take a hit as they may end up in much lower paying jobs.
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Old 07-02-2009, 12:54 PM
 
1,310 posts, read 2,640,118 times
Reputation: 581
Quote:
Originally Posted by baystater View Post
So America has had a great run of success for the last fifty or so years. Things for the most part I would say were bright for most American. A growing middle class, high product output (industrial), and an ability basically have what ever we wanted when ever we wanted it. Yes overall it thinks times were good for America with a few hiccups along the way.
But now. I think (only my thought) that America is heading for a long and probably rather painful economic slide. While I don't see us as rolling into a third world country. I do believe we will be more like a Briton or perhaps a Spain. (Basically we won't be the center of the universe economically any more.) And while we will still have ability to have the basics and then some comforts on top of that. The ability of most Americanís of getting what you want all the time, I believe will be gone.
No latest, greatest I-phone, gaming systems. No more getting/leasing a new car every couple of years, No more betting your life saving into the speculative stock market looking to become the next millionaire. No more asking ridiculous sums of money for a box where you hang your hat at the end of the day (otherwise known as a house.) etc., etc.
Yes I think irrational exuberance is out the window at this point. And yes I do see our standard of living lower overall. This actually if you really look at was pretty damned high.

So at this point let me get to the questions I want to ask all the Good people of the CD community.

If it comes down to it.

Are you prepared for a lower standard of living than you have lived in the past?

Do you think America/Americans will be able (in the shorter term) to handle their standard of living at a lower level?


Let me just say one thing I don't believe it all doom and gloom out there. America I believe has on trump card to play against other nations if needed. That would be the ability of America to produce food. We are (I believe) extremely good at this. And can still make a good profit in this area. Granted Monsanto overall is not making it easy for independent farmer to make their grade. But that is another issue.
Ive already willing moved to a lower standard of living and am unashamed about it because its a sensible choice to not live beyond ones means ; but in the USA, it bucks the philosophy of personal entitlement and how material goods define a person . Americans have been inundated too long with the Medias glorification of materialism and hedonism , and its had to take an economic collapse to make them wake up and change their ways. (some still refuse to even when theyre broke) . Im glad i wasnt raised that way .
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Old 07-02-2009, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,045 posts, read 18,260,654 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
The whole topic here is the difference between what you think you can comfortably afford today, and what you can afford a year or two from now. I know quite a few people who thought they could comfortably afford lots of things, and now they have found out they were wrong.
Yes, absolutely true. But to me, "comfortably afford" occurs well after paying off all debts and putting a percentage of earnings into savings. Even now, in reduced circumstances. I can say, for instance, that I can very comfortably afford to buy my dog a slice of good quality roast beef. But although I may have the money for it in savings, I cannot afford a trip to Europe, or anywhere else "away." But I CAN afford a nice afternoon at the park. What we can afford has to take into account not what we have on hand for money, but our entire circumstances including the forseeable future (and these days, who can foresee that??)
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Old 07-02-2009, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 34,361,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RVlover View Post
Ive already willing moved to a lower standard of living and am unashamed about it because its a sensible choice to not live beyond ones means ;
I'll agree with the bolded portion above. But, I'd ask you to define "living beyone ones means" - because it seems that if you tell of someone who have a number of cars, a large home, travelling etc., it seems that some immediately jump on this sort of person as "Living beyond their means".
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Old 07-02-2009, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Norwood, MN
1,828 posts, read 3,279,635 times
Reputation: 871
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
I'll agree with the bolded portion above. But, I'd ask you to define "living beyone ones means" - because it seems that if you tell of someone who have a number of cars, a large home, travelling etc., it seems that some immediately jump on this sort of person as "Living beyond their means".
Wouldnt you feel better giving the extra money to charity than living like a greedy pig?
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Old 07-02-2009, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Pinal County, Arizona
25,107 posts, read 34,361,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big daryle View Post
Wouldnt you feel better giving the extra money to charity than living like a greedy pig?
What do you mean "living like a greedy pig?

I'm sorry but - that does not make any sense to me.
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Old 07-02-2009, 04:03 PM
 
1,310 posts, read 2,640,118 times
Reputation: 581
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatday View Post
I'll agree with the bolded portion above. But, I'd ask you to define "living beyone ones means" - because it seems that if you tell of someone who have a number of cars, a large home, travelling etc., it seems that some immediately jump on this sort of person as "Living beyond their means".
To clarify, someone whos 'eyes are bigger than their pocketbook' ; IE: Someone buying a house, automobile, or having children which they cant afford, yet having them because they desire them. IE: The average American owes 11 times what they make . IE: Our own Government borrowing huge sums of money from China because theyve been financially irresponsible all along. IE: Willfuly uncontrolled hedonism at any expense.
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Old 07-02-2009, 04:27 PM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,155 posts, read 16,873,712 times
Reputation: 5009
Quote:
Originally Posted by RVlover View Post
To clarify, someone whos 'eyes are bigger than their pocketbook' ; IE: Someone buying a house, automobile, or having children which they cant afford, yet having them because they desire them. IE: The average American owes 11 times what they make . IE: Our own Government borrowing huge sums of money from China because theyve been financially irresponsible all along. IE: Willfuly uncontrolled hedonism at any expense.
I have a nice home, cars, children. All of them I can afford. How would having that make anyone a "greedy pig"?

You're not making any sense. You assume that someone who has these things 1) can't afforfd them, 2) feels they desire them, 3) is an average American owing 11 times what they make. How would you know how much any given person makes.

Or are you just mad at "the rich" greedy pigs ("rich" being those who have a bit more than you do)?
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Old 07-02-2009, 04:29 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,237 posts, read 72,402,860 times
Reputation: 47449
i came from a rough background so more hard times is no stranger. this is one advantage the kidults dont have and they are guna need it.
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