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Old 07-19-2010, 01:16 AM
 
Location: Oxford, MS
30 posts, read 93,028 times
Reputation: 22

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Hey. What's going on everyone?

So, I'm moving into a new apartment here in a few days (10 to be exact) and I was hoping that maybe y'all have some tips for stuff that can be done in an apartment setting.

I googled some stuff on it; however, most everything I found was nothing but broken links and stuff that's impossible to do in an apartment, like changing the toilet (I don't think the landlord would be too happy haha).

Oh and although I'm doing this all on a college student budget, feel free to include anything as with the current economy I'm sure I'll be in an apartment for many years to come...
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Old 07-21-2010, 08:18 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,408,176 times
Reputation: 6702
Living in an apartment (and not a single family home) is in itself a relatively "green" thing to do, so I think you get some bonus points right from the start! There's all the obvious things: make sure there's recycling, etc.. You might also want to check about composting (either see if they have a dumpster for organics recycling, or else have their own compost bin, or, if not, if they'd be open to starting a composting program -- I've seen apartment buildings that have them), etc. Asking about bike racks is also a good one; I've noticed in Minneapolis that more and more buildings seem to be getting formal bike racks for their residents, and otherwise making it easier for apartment dwellers to easily own and ride bikes.
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Old 01-04-2011, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Vermont
5,439 posts, read 14,774,922 times
Reputation: 2630
We are in a condo, and do not want to throw our organic matter in the garbage. We don't really have anything to do with it here (I don't want a worm composter, for example).

If I just put it all in a 5 gal bucket with holes in the top, and stick it on the balcony, do you think this will be OK for say, a week or so at a time between when we can drop it off at a local farm?
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Old 01-04-2011, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,581 posts, read 24,992,689 times
Reputation: 20834
use a clothesline and never use a dryer.
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Old 01-05-2011, 05:37 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
1,030 posts, read 1,286,649 times
Reputation: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightcrawler View Post
use a clothesline and never use a dryer.
and where do you hang it with no yard? I'm sure the apartment complex really appreciates your undies blowing off the balcony.

Quote:
Originally Posted by uptown_urbanist View Post
Living in an apartment (and not a single family home) is in itself a relatively "green" thing to do, so I think you get some bonus points right from the start! There's all the obvious things: make sure there's recycling, etc.. You might also want to check about composting (either see if they have a dumpster for organics recycling, or else have their own compost bin, or, if not, if they'd be open to starting a composting program -- I've seen apartment buildings that have them), etc. Asking about bike racks is also a good one; I've noticed in Minneapolis that more and more buildings seem to be getting formal bike racks for their residents, and otherwise making it easier for apartment dwellers to easily own and ride bikes.
I want to see minnesota residents riding to work this time of year...
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Old 01-05-2011, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,581 posts, read 24,992,689 times
Reputation: 20834
I knew that would be the first response, "undies in the breeze"......there are other articles besides undies that have to be washed as well. besides we all have undies, and I am not offended at seeing someone elses hanging either, because I wouldn't even give it a second look.

also, ever heard of a "drying rack", or a "piece of rope"......oh, and there is a new invention called "clothespins" that actually secure the clothes to the line so the wouldn't blow off.

People aren't that green if they still use a dryer.....

Clotheslines are everywhere in Europe, for some reason people there are not offended about looking at drying clothes on a clothesline, or a balcony, or hanging in front of apartments as Americans are.... we really do have serious stupid hangups here.
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Old 01-05-2011, 09:04 AM
 
3,111 posts, read 7,015,115 times
Reputation: 4251
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightcrawler View Post
I knew that would be the first response, "undies in the breeze"......there are other articles besides undies that have to be washed as well. besides we all have undies, and I am not offended at seeing someone elses hanging either, because I wouldn't even give it a second look.

also, ever heard of a "drying rack", or a "piece of rope"......oh, and there is a new invention called "clothespins" that actually secure the clothes to the line so the wouldn't blow off.

People aren't that green if they still use a dryer.....

Clotheslines are everywhere in Europe, for some reason people there are not offended about looking at drying clothes on a clothesline, or a balcony, or hanging in front of apartments as Americans are.... we really do have serious stupid hangups here.
I agree. I actually had someone complain to the complex manager that I was using my balcony to dry clothes.
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Old 01-05-2011, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,581 posts, read 24,992,689 times
Reputation: 20834
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrEarth View Post
I agree. I actually had someone complain to the complex manager that I was using my balcony to dry clothes.
really, isn't it ridiculous....especially if they are on a rack, they are really not seen, then when dry the rack fold up and put away.....really no big deal.

and also, that is another use a balcony is for, to do thing that you would do in a back yard, but in a smaller scale,
table chairs, plants, clothes......
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Old 01-05-2011, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
3,582 posts, read 5,307,643 times
Reputation: 2205
The problem with apartments is that the owners don't have much incentive to provide energy-efficient housing to their renters. Things like leaky ductwork and lack of programmable thermostats can add substantially to your heating/cooling bills. Also many buildings are underinsulated b/c again potential renters would never know this in advance. Add to this that there is often a group pricing scheme for water use which only encourages more waste. The same goes for appliances where often the cheapest least efficient dishwasher and fridges are spec'd.

I would love to see a program of some type of LEED certification for apartments where they would be rated 1 to 5 stars. That way complex owners would have incentive to upgrade or build properly in the first place while consumers would have a better idea as to what their utility bills and energy usage will be.
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Old 01-07-2011, 10:43 AM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,829 posts, read 21,132,956 times
Reputation: 9418
As mentioned in anther thread I use a manuel clothes washer and "line dry" my clothes inside. So far no one has complained about me stinking (any more than usual ) Seriously, my clothes are as clean and soft as when I used washing and drying machines.

The washer I bought was called the Wonderwash, there are lots of similar ones I'm sure. What they do that a bucket doesn't is two things:

1. They have a crank that turns an air tight bucket. The movement AND the air tight seal ensure that the dertergent dissolves and washes the clothes. Take those things away and only a fraction of the powder dertegent actually cleans the clothes

2. They have a nosle on the bottom which drains the bucket into a nearby sink. This keeps you from having a lift a heavy water filled bucket.
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