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Old 08-08-2010, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Vermont
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I am not sure but I LOVE my AC. Mostly what I love is that it reduces the humidity. We keep it at 75 in the summer which I think is pretty reasonable for NJ.

I remember in AZ i think we kept it at around 85 inside????? when it was 110 out.
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Old 08-09-2010, 08:28 AM
 
Location: Minnysoda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightcrawler View Post
I think with a lot of the new construction going on now, especially in apartment buildings, there are not as many windows as there was back in the day, when law stated windows are to be in every room for light and ventilation.
Now apartments are built and bathrooms never have windows, kitchens are combined with living rooms and have maybe 2 windows if your lucky...Most apartments now do not even have cross ventilation, as each unit is facing one direction,then you get the apartments with walls of glass, and nothing opens, why?? because the builders know everyone uses a/c.
So air circulation unfortunetely seems to be a thing of the past.
Not just apartments. Look at old houses, big wide covered porches, windows aligned with prevailing winds, kitchens in the back or even a "summer kitchen' outside. lots of trees around......everything to keep as cool as they could........Looks also at trends in the working day.When I was a kid we would get up early work and hard till it gets hot.....then relax for a bit and start up again when it cools off before it gets dark.....I still do that now except I retreat into the AC in the afternoon thank God for that!!!!
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Old 08-09-2010, 05:56 PM
 
Location: CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wilson1010 View Post
"Other than that Mrs. Lincoln, how was the play"

You are kidding, right? Death Valley is the driest place on the continent having an average humidity in August of less than 30% and you are surprised that its comfortable there even with an average August temperature of 85?

Do you know that Springfield Mo has an average August daytime humidity of almost 90%?

"A little different . . ."
I've lived in higher humidity places too, without A/C.

And in August here, it sure isn't 85 on any regular basis. That would be one very cool day.

Regardless, people were living in Springfield, MO and lots of other places well before A/C. Somehow they survived.
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Old 08-09-2010, 05:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigcats View Post
I've lived in higher humidity places too, without A/C.

And in August here, it sure isn't 85 on any regular basis. That would be one very cool day.

Regardless, people were living in Springfield, MO and lots of other places well before A/C. Somehow they survived.

I did not refer to daytime high temperature. The average August temperature in Death Valley Ca is 85 and 30 humidity just like I said. Look it up.
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Old 08-09-2010, 06:22 PM
 
Location: CA
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You've got the average daily low temperature.

Death Valley National Park Weather Page

and

Death Valley, California Climate, Temperature, Average Weather History, Rainfall/ Precipitation, Sunshine

With the average daily high being 113, and the average daily temperature in August, 99.

On the other hand, 30% humidity sounds high to me, given that we rarely seem to have days here (where I am, which should have slightly higher humidity than DV) over 10%. I'm tired of searching for that one though.

I still say, any place that had people living there prior to A/C (including DV and Missouri) means A/C is not a requirement for human life there. I don't doubt it's more comfortable for most people.
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Old 08-09-2010, 07:02 PM
 
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No I don't. You have it wrong.

City Data, where this forum is venued has the data. Go up to the top of this page, click on City Data.com, enter Death Valley Ca and scroll down to temperatures. Humidity is there too.
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Old 08-09-2010, 11:45 PM
 
Location: CA
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Sorry, City-Data is wrong. There is absolutely no way the average humidity is 30% in Death Valley in August. It's been running 6% here so far this month, and we're moister than DV. And every other source I find on the web confirms the average temp I linked to above. Possibly CD is using temps data from the DV mountains instead of the valley floor, but even then I find that humidity data outrageous. 30% humidity around these parts is downright WET.

I guarantee if you travel into DV tomorrow, you might possibly get down to 85 degrees at 2am, but at no other time.

Here are some more links to average temperature charts for DV by month:

DEATH VALLEY, CALIFORNIA - Climate Summary

Average Weather for Death Valley, CA - Temperature and Precipitation

Death Valley National Park: Weather, Geography, Map - DesertUSA

Death Valley Lodging. Furnace Creek Inn and Ranch Resort - What's the Weather at the Furnace Creek Resort

I also notice City-Data has the population of my town wrong, so I guess it's not always particularly reliable.



Edited to add: So when I do a search for the town of Furnace Creek, CA, smack dab in DV (where one would assume the "DV temp" is typically reported from) on City-Data, they show the data that is reported on all those other sites with the average just a smidgen under 100, and the average MINIMUM at 85. Not sure if their "Death Valley" data is just screwed up, transposed from some other location, or if they're averaging wildly different elevations (Badwater at -280 up to Telescope Peak at +11,000) across the region to come up with something misleading.

Last edited by bigcats; 08-10-2010 at 12:10 AM..
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Old 08-10-2010, 01:15 AM
 
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I'll accept that City Data is wrong on average temp. You live there. But, its 74 F. in Death Valley Ca right this minute according to Intellicast. 10 F degrees cooler than it is in Cincinnati Ohio. And, the humidity here is 93%. And, the whole point is that humidity is what makes heat unbearable. If I step outside for a minute, I will be sticky and damp, and hot.
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Old 08-10-2010, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Vermont
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people lived lots of placed without AC many years ago but they also did not put on suits and go to work and i don't think there was an expectation not to be drenched in sweat or smell of body odor.
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Old 08-10-2010, 10:11 AM
 
Location: CA
830 posts, read 2,360,217 times
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Quote:
I'll accept that City Data is wrong on average temp. You live there. But, its 74 F. in Death Valley Ca right this minute according to Intellicast. 10 F degrees cooler than it is in Cincinnati Ohio. And, the humidity here is 93%. And, the whole point is that humidity is what makes heat unbearable. If I step outside for a minute, I will be sticky and damp, and hot.
True, the last couple days have been surprisingly cool. It's supposed to get back to normal by the end of the week. I was just having a conversation with someone about how 91 degrees at 6pm (what it was yesterday evening when we were chatting) was a lovely break. I agree about humidity - I don't enjoy it either. I just think there's a difference between something that's incompatible with life and something that's merely uncomfortable. And I don't think that I need to be spared of any degree of discomfort at all times and costs.

Quote:
people lived lots of placed without AC many years ago but they also did not put on suits and go to work and i don't think there was an expectation not to be drenched in sweat or smell of body odor.
They did wear long sleeved prairie dresses, multiple layers, and things like that. They worked outside, perhaps on farms, in the direct sun. In many hot places today, they wear head-to-toe coverings. They also didn't have deoderant back then, which I think probably has more to do with the lack of expectations about absence of body odors.
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