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Old 08-29-2016, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,837 posts, read 25,212,240 times
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I did the same thing when I lived in MN! Glad you are selling to your son because there are all kinds of restrictions/laws on what you have to do to the old oil tank! Make sure to look them up!
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Old 08-29-2016, 02:59 PM
 
Location: DC
6,505 posts, read 6,424,922 times
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Natural gas is almost always cheaper than fuel oil. In addition there are no supply security issues. It sounds to me like you are using a lot of energy for Norfolk (VA?). Have you checked the insulation in your house?
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Old 08-29-2016, 06:44 PM
 
4,315 posts, read 2,485,019 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
I did the same thing when I lived in MN! Glad you are selling to your son because there are all kinds of restrictions/laws on what you have to do to the old oil tank! Make sure to look them up!
The fuel oil tank is inside the basement.


I think it probably was put in the basement and then the house built (1957 )
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Old 08-29-2016, 11:12 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,379 posts, read 39,695,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
The fuel oil tank is inside the basement.
indoor Fuel oil tanks are Excellent for the person who wants to "brew-their-own"!!


(for the next person who reads this who has not YET switched to Propane)...

https://www.google.com/search?q=appl...HQ3VAMUQ7AkIQA

One of my friends gets 350 gal FREE wvo / week. That covers home heating and vehicle / business fuel for him and extended family.
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Old 09-14-2016, 12:17 PM
 
Location: not normal, IL
776 posts, read 390,406 times
Reputation: 917
Quote:
Originally Posted by my54ford View Post
one of the best uses of biodiesel would be as a heating fuel. When in used in an internal combustion engine it tends to release more NOx at higher blends. When used in furnace fuel it does not have the impact of high compression that creates the NOx
I wouldn't suggest this as I'm a diesel mechanic and had a friend in college that produced Biodiesel. It is great in the heat but when it gels up when slightly cold and doesn't burn very well. Diesels burn very hot in the combustion chamber so this is a bad idea. I worked on boilers for many years and had a friend put a small tank boiler system in and it ran very efficiently, I don't know if the gains would be good enough for a tankless water heater. It makes sense to have a tankless water heater for water use because you don't need x amount of gallons all the time but with a heating system, your going to have stored hot water one way or another.

Last edited by Nothere1; 09-14-2016 at 12:18 PM.. Reason: spelling
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Old 09-18-2016, 12:57 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,379 posts, read 39,695,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nothere1 View Post
I wouldn't suggest this as I'm a diesel mechanic and had a friend in college that produced Biodiesel. It is great in the heavt but when it gels up when slightly cold and doesn't burn very well. .....
As a diesel mechanic, you should know that bio diesel does not gel (as does dino diesel)

Different bio feedstocks become 'crystalline' at cooler temperatures. Some worse than others. USA biodiesel board is owned and run by the USA Soybean council. (Wonder why ). Soy diesel is one of the the worst feedstocks possible for crystaline issues. Thus USA has really BAD bio-diesel compared to most of the world. ( and why engine Manufacturers cap warranty at max 5% BD, while some other countries / manufacturers / feedstocks have full diesel engine warranty at 100% BD.

It is very common to (and simple) to preheat bio or WVO before processing.
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Old 09-20-2016, 08:28 AM
 
Location: not normal, IL
776 posts, read 390,406 times
Reputation: 917
Quote:
Originally Posted by StealthRabbit View Post
As a diesel mechanic, you should know that bio diesel does not gel (as does dino diesel)

???, 'gelling' is what we refer to as crystallizing. We have millions that would agree that bio diesel crystallizes.

Different bio feedstocks become 'crystalline' at cooler temperatures. Some worse than others. USA biodiesel board is owned and run by the USA Soybean council. (Wonder why ). Soy diesel is one of the the worst feedstocks possible for crystaline issues. Thus USA has really BAD bio-diesel compared to most of the world. ( and why engine Manufacturers cap warranty at max 5% BD, while some other countries / manufacturers / feedstocks have full diesel engine warranty at 100% BD.

Would agree with first, wouldn't know about the second.

It is very common to (and simple) to preheat bio or WVO before processing.
I have worked on waste oil furnaces and boilers for five years. It is a bad idea to preheat different hydrocarbon chain fuels in the same heater or heat exchanger. It is just plane best to have one consistent ratio.
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Old 09-20-2016, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
27,166 posts, read 17,498,108 times
Reputation: 15364
Have you considered a heat pump?
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Old 09-21-2016, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
8,574 posts, read 8,492,126 times
Reputation: 5145
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nothere1 View Post
I wouldn't suggest this as I'm a diesel mechanic and had a friend in college that produced Biodiesel. It is great in the heat but when it gels up when slightly cold and doesn't burn very well. Diesels burn very hot in the combustion chamber so this is a bad idea. I worked on boilers for many years and had a friend put a small tank boiler system in and it ran very efficiently, I don't know if the gains would be good enough for a tankless water heater. It makes sense to have a tankless water heater for water use because you don't need x amount of gallons all the time but with a heating system, your going to have stored hot water one way or another.
OK, I'm a Diesel mech too and have a Chief boiler operator ticket. I have worked extensively with the U of M diesel program scientist in the use of soy based bioD in power generation ( much of this work was used to develop Minnesota Bio diesel standard) I can tell you categorically that the best use of bio-d is in boilers. When used in a CI-rice in blends above 20% the NOx raises exponentially. When used in a boiler you can us much higher blend up to 100% and maintain low emission rates. Any oil fired boiler used in PG run F/O preheaters as standard equipment............just saying...
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Old 09-22-2016, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,308 posts, read 59,575,988 times
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Wow, you guys must keep your thermostat at 80 degrees! With the thermostat at 65 degrees, in suburban Philadelphia, I use about 200-250 gallons of oil each season. And that was with a 40-year-old furnace, which I just replaced last April.

There's no natural gas source in my neighborhood, so oil is pretty much my only choice.
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