U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-10-2011, 11:02 AM
 
17,751 posts, read 15,649,850 times
Reputation: 6391

Advertisements

Why I hate lawns with a passion | Gainesville.com


After feeding creamed Canadian thistle to a baby, which is just one of a dozen free, organic, super nutrient foods in my "unkempt" lawn, the smell of coming from the chemicals of the "lawn doctor" when visiting friends this weekend was a reminder of about everything that is wrong with this country, and just put me over the edge.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-10-2011, 11:51 AM
 
Location: Connecticut is my adopted home.
2,277 posts, read 3,079,972 times
Reputation: 7018
Yes. I hate the smell of that stuff too. It's a problem when walking our dogs, to keep them off newly nuked lawns. In particular 2-4D is bad news for pets.

My neighbor complained that she had no earthworms. I nicely told her that the pounds of chemicals her husband pours on their lawn every year is killing everything including their recently dead apple tree which couldn't take the chemical stress even though it was under 10 years old. She said that her husband had a vendetta against dandelions to which I suggested the satisfaction of digging them out as an alternative.

I have a decent but not weed free lawn and it doesn't take chemicals to maintain it. We use the corn gluten meal as fertilizer occasionally. I dig dandelions or more rarely use vinegar on them and we mow it down regularly to keep it under some control and to preserve the urban landscape. That's it. Our earthworms are massive. Our garden beds prolific with home grown compost as fertilizer.

The chemical pellets are bad enough but I really hate the spraying. Often enough it drifts around toward my organic garden beds and though I've asked neighbors to cease spraying when the wind is blowing, I have to do it too often.

I dread the poison season.

Sadly, I might need acreage and will have to build and garden in the middle of it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2011, 02:49 PM
 
17,751 posts, read 15,649,850 times
Reputation: 6391
Quote:
Originally Posted by AK-Cathy View Post
Yes. I hate the smell of that stuff too. It's a problem when walking our dogs, to keep them off newly nuked lawns. In particular 2-4D is bad news for pets.

My neighbor complained that she had no earthworms. I nicely told her that the pounds of chemicals her husband pours on their lawn every year is killing everything including their recently dead apple tree which couldn't take the chemical stress even though it was under 10 years old. She said that her husband had a vendetta against dandelions to which I suggested the satisfaction of digging them out as an alternative.

I have a decent but not weed free lawn and it doesn't take chemicals to maintain it. We use the corn gluten meal as fertilizer occasionally. I dig dandelions or more rarely use vinegar on them and we mow it down regularly to keep it under some control and to preserve the urban landscape. That's it. Our earthworms are massive. Our garden beds prolific with home grown compost as fertilizer.

The chemical pellets are bad enough but I really hate the spraying. Often enough it drifts around toward my organic garden beds and though I've asked neighbors to cease spraying when the wind is blowing, I have to do it too often.

I dread the poison season.

Sadly, I might need acreage and will have to build and garden in the middle of it.
Hi AK-Cathy,

If you don't like them then corn gluten is the way to go.


I gladly dig them up but not to eradication in my yard. I did take a lot from a neighbor since I know her cultural practice. Dandelion used to save lives from scurvy. Humans are an ungrateful lot. The root tea is quite good. For those that don't like bitter greens even as a pot herb, the blossoms are great as fritters. I love em.

I tell you if that spray cloud ruined my tomato plants...

Buy Traditional Medicinals Caffeine Free Herbal Tea, Organic Dandelion Root Online at drugstore.com

Better than decaf and a diuretic that does not deplete potassium.

I made dandelion blossom and chive pasta this weekend. The blossoms gave a subtle sweet flavor and a nice yellow hue. I'll try this too.
http://hungerandthirstforlife.blogsp...-blossoms.html

Last edited by gwynedd1; 05-10-2011 at 03:06 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-10-2011, 05:36 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,958 posts, read 22,271,168 times
Reputation: 9066
Wildflowers like dandelions are a lot nicer to look at than a bland lawn full of toxic chemicals. I hate lawns.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2011, 09:44 AM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
10,871 posts, read 10,569,444 times
Reputation: 9536
I've never been a fan of lawns. I really don't see the utility--seems a total waste of otherwise usable ground. Of course, a weedpatch is even worse. My idea of a perfect yard would be food crops that are easily stored/preserved once harvested. For instance, I think a yard of winter wheat, oats, or spelt would be great. It would be an edible "lawn" and would get people more in touch with what they eat (or should be eating more of). Many folks can throw a few tomato plants in the back yard, water them, pick them, and eat them for a few weeks out of the year. But I'd bet very few people understand the (much more important) process behind the bread (or other grain derived foods) they eat.

Or, if you wanted a more colorful/creative "lawn," how about amaranth, quinoa, or millet? That would be cool. Have you tasted quinoa? Wonderful stuff!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-13-2011, 11:57 AM
 
17,751 posts, read 15,649,850 times
Reputation: 6391
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
I've never been a fan of lawns. I really don't see the utility--seems a total waste of otherwise usable ground. Of course, a weedpatch is even worse. My idea of a perfect yard would be food crops that are easily stored/preserved once harvested. For instance, I think a yard of winter wheat, oats, or spelt would be great. It would be an edible "lawn" and would get people more in touch with what they eat (or should be eating more of). Many folks can throw a few tomato plants in the back yard, water them, pick them, and eat them for a few weeks out of the year. But I'd bet very few people understand the (much more important) process behind the bread (or other grain derived foods) they eat.

Or, if you wanted a more colorful/creative "lawn," how about amaranth, quinoa, or millet? That would be cool. Have you tasted quinoa? Wonderful stuff!
Hi ChrisC,

Weeds are by definition bad. However plants that are often identified as weeds are often quite good. So they may only be worse than lawns by first impression. Amaranth is a perfect example. It is considered a noxious weed in many contexts. Amaranth is also another grain depending on how you use it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2011, 04:32 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
10,871 posts, read 10,569,444 times
Reputation: 9536
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwynedd1 View Post
Hi ChrisC,

Weeds are by definition bad. However plants that are often identified as weeds are often quite good. So they may only be worse than lawns by first impression. Amaranth is a perfect example. It is considered a noxious weed in many contexts. Amaranth is also another grain depending on how you use it.
A while back I bought a couple of books or edible wild plants (many in the books are what most would consider "weeds"). Quite an eye opener. Lots of the things the "yard nazis" are killing so the lawn will sit there untouched and unused (but look nice all summer long) are perfectly good and healthy food.

I've been a big grain (and grain-derived foods) fan most all of my life--I tend to eat a lots of the various incarnations. When I tried some of the more obscure grains like amaranth, millet, quinoa, etc... I fell in love with them right away. Quinoa is more or less a grass seed lookalike (but is considered a grain and is a staple food in some parts of the world--but here it would be considered a weed) that has a wonderful taste. I'm surprised it's not a more popular food. Most folks have never even heard of millet, quinoa, or amaranth (other than the color amaranth). Pity. They are all great.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-14-2011, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Minnysoda
8,636 posts, read 8,532,839 times
Reputation: 5180
Sieg Heil yard Nazis!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2011, 12:14 PM
 
17,751 posts, read 15,649,850 times
Reputation: 6391
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisC View Post
A while back I bought a couple of books or edible wild plants (many in the books are what most would consider "weeds"). Quite an eye opener. Lots of the things the "yard nazis" are killing so the lawn will sit there untouched and unused (but look nice all summer long) are perfectly good and healthy food.

I've been a big grain (and grain-derived foods) fan most all of my life--I tend to eat a lots of the various incarnations. When I tried some of the more obscure grains like amaranth, millet, quinoa, etc... I fell in love with them right away. Quinoa is more or less a grass seed lookalike (but is considered a grain and is a staple food in some parts of the world--but here it would be considered a weed) that has a wonderful taste. I'm surprised it's not a more popular food. Most folks have never even heard of millet, quinoa, or amaranth (other than the color amaranth). Pity. They are all great.
Hi ChrisC,

That it is. I am now eating an acorn crust and canadian thistle quiche. I remember reading about how little edible biomass there was out there according to Jaraed Diamond, the author of Guns Germs and Steel. Its way off. Its all in the timing. Just looking at tress In my burbs you could tap both birch and maple trees including sugar, red, silver maple and even box elder. There is black cherry, hack berry, black walnut, mulberry, oak, nanny berry, black locust, wild plum, apple and service berry. This is in a populated burb. This is without even trying and in many cases food is actively destroyed.


I can forgive people for not knowing about quinoa when it is not native. However this British grass crap that began as a me-too-ism to copy British nobility, you know in foggy Britain, is just sick.

In wetlands, that are unfortunately of questionable environmental status, there would be cattail, wapato and lotus; lots of it. I walk out my door and eat garlic mustard., thistles, burdock, lambs quarters, chick weed, purslane, dandelion, wood sorrel. I have added as edible landscape, high bush cranberry, nanny berry, ostrich fern, service berry, hazelnut, gooseberry, wild strawberry, solomon's seal, false solomon's seal.They need little or no cultivation.

I gather and process this in the same amount of time the average American views TV. The solution to food prices, energy consumption, and nutrition is all right there. Yet I am surrounded by fatties in the corn-soy matrix.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-17-2011, 08:13 PM
 
553 posts, read 900,338 times
Reputation: 289
I want to plant a lilac bush across my sidewalk in front of my house.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top