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Old 07-17-2011, 05:06 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
7,376 posts, read 12,913,447 times
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There is a lady neighbor who has several big plastic planters on the edge of her patio with a tomato plant in each one. They're looking great! In one planter, on the outer edge, she planted leaf lettuce, another has onions and radishes. Parsley is growing in pots hanging around the edge of the porch.
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Old 07-19-2011, 09:03 AM
 
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I built self watering 5 gallon buckets. Cost per unit was well under $10. It cuts watering down by half. I use a series of funnels for quick refill. You use two buckets and stack them while the bottom one serves as a reservoir.






Its all in the compost. This squash eventually out grew it but you can see whats possible. Squash is a little cramped. Tomatoes, cucumbers, eggplant and peppers and pole beans all do very well and much better than in the ground. Think anyone else had plants this size in Chicago June 24th? No, because their soil is less controlled, have to wait longer for ground thaw and can't move them into cold frames or green houses to start. Virtually no weeding, or problems with rabbits.

The mobility is really telling with pepper plants because you can over winter them. I should get a photo of them. I have already had 10 bell peppers this year from two plants. Getting more than 5 in this climate is unheard of especially in early July. I will probably get over 6 times that yield. With the hot banana pepper plant, I have lost count but its well over 50.

Last edited by gwynedd1; 07-19-2011 at 09:13 AM..
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Old 07-19-2011, 09:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joke Insurance View Post
What is the difference between urban gardening and urban foraging?
Hi Joke Insurance,

Same as foraging vs farming. Foraging is typically going out to find wild food. A garden is essentially farming. I tend to get more edible mass from foraging since I count space by the foot in the garden while I have acres in the parks and wild areas.
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Old 08-19-2011, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwynedd1 View Post
Hi Joke Insurance,

Same as foraging vs farming. Foraging is typically going out to find wild food. A garden is essentially farming. I tend to get more edible mass from foraging since I count space by the foot in the garden while I have acres in the parks and wild areas.
What resources do you use to figure out what is edible or not?
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Old 08-19-2011, 06:59 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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This is an oldie, but a goodie. If you aren't familiar with the Garden Girl on youtube, please check it out.

GardenGirltv's Channel - YouTube

20yrsinBranson
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Old 08-20-2011, 03:33 PM
 
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Start small and grow easy stuff your first year. Zucchini and summer squash perform very well in large pots and have great yields. Container tomatoes are another good choice for newbies. Lettuce, herbs, and bush beans are also pretty easy, and they provide an excellent return for your investment of time and money.
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Old 09-18-2011, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by formercalifornian View Post
Start small and grow easy stuff your first year. Zucchini and summer squash perform very well in large pots and have great yields. Container tomatoes are another good choice for newbies. Lettuce, herbs, and bush beans are also pretty easy, and they provide an excellent return for your investment of time and money.
Thanks for the advice
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Old 09-20-2011, 01:50 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,142,433 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joke Insurance View Post
What resources do you use to figure out what is edible or not?
Do a search on Amazon for books on "foraging & edible plants" and you will find a number of resources. Some are regional and some are more generalized.

A word of warning: if you plan to forgage you MUST be very certain that you have correctly identified the plant. Do not guess!

Many plants are similar in appearance and if you eat a poisonous one or a poisonous part of a plant that has edible parts, you could kill yourself. You will also want to test first to find out if you may be allergic. Foraging in urban parks (if legal) runs one at a risk of exposure to pesticides and other chemicals. Never forage at roadsides (petro chemical absorbtion by plants).

How To Forage Safely: Common Sense is the Best Tool You Can Have When Foraging | Suite101.com

Some state departments of Conservation, county extension offices, and community colleges, offer outdoor classes including foraging and identifying edible plants. You might investigate to find if there is one offered in your area. Depending upon where you live it may be a bit late this year.

Last edited by lifelongMOgal; 09-20-2011 at 01:59 PM..
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Old 09-20-2011, 11:16 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
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Cut up a couple seed potatoes and plant them in a 5 gallon bucket. Should get some good potatoes.
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Old 09-21-2011, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joke Insurance View Post
What is the difference between urban gardening and urban foraging?
Urban foraging is dumpster diving.
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