U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-21-2011, 04:15 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,133,594 times
Reputation: 12760

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
Urban foraging is dumpster diving.
That could be one aspect, however, another aspect is the ability to identify commonly used landscaping flowers/plants/trees and know if they are edible and their uses. Same could be said for weeds and tree rats.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-24-2011, 02:17 PM
 
17 posts, read 28,706 times
Reputation: 19
North-central PHX area has abundance of tree-lined streets, green irrigated lawns, gardens, and lots of shade trees. Can even find citrus groves in some back yards. Incredible that something of this nature can be found in a desert city outside of Downtown but it lowers the outdoor air temperature, I would say @ least 5-8 degrees of cooling compared to the other areas that have no shade trees and rock or xeriscape for lawns.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2011, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 4,775,225 times
Reputation: 1454
I will have to check that website out. Thank you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-25-2012, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 4,775,225 times
Reputation: 1454
Do you guys think that this is safe to do?


Quote:
http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/308653_10150339598618321_346272093320_8143754_1177 242280_n.jpg (broken link) Wall Photos | Facebook

Eco-Vision Sustainable Learning Center - Eco-Vision Sustainable Learning Center - Non-Profit Organization - Delavan, WI | Facebook
It's amazing how easy it can be to transform something that would often end up into the garbage, into something both beautiful and useful.
Unlike Share October 22, 2011
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-26-2012, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 34,324,159 times
Reputation: 7077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joke Insurance View Post
Do you guys think that this is safe to do?
Are you referring to the possibility of BPA leaching into the cilantro from the soda bottle?

It's probably pretty safe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-30-2012, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
9,605 posts, read 18,802,940 times
Reputation: 8462
If you want a larger garden than five gallon buckets, you can make a raised bed garden pretty easily. Stack bricks, railroad timbers or whatever you have a lot of up about a foot to two feet tall. We used cinder blocks and stacked them two high so it's a foot and a half deep. Arrange it so you'll be able to reach into the center of the space, so no more than five or six feet wide. Fill it with garden soil or top soil. Ask a gardening friend how to get good soil to grow vegetables in. The top six inches are the most important six inches so put the best soil there.

Good starting crops are radishes, beans and squash, mostly because they are hardy and easy to grow. A few marigolds can be added in to help repel a few insects. If you are planning on tomatoes, they do best if they are either started indoors earlier or bought as small plants and set out into your garden. Peppers and tomato plants can be started indoors quite awhile before the rest of the garden is planted. I don't know when the last frost is in your area, but if you have any neighbors who garden, you could ask them. The garden store will probably have some advice on what to plant and when, too.

Hmm, the soda bottle planter wall looks interesting, but it would take a long time to water them all, don't you think?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-31-2012, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,617,662 times
Reputation: 3358
Growing vertically in containers is a great way for urban dwellers to garden when they don't have a plot of land for a conventional garden. As long as you have access to some sun on a balcony, or a sunny wall, you can grow outdoors (or even indoors!).

Here's one using a canvas hanging shoe organizer that would be deep enough for most of your root vegetables:


And another using salvaged gutters that would be excellent for any of the shallow rooted greens:



There are several upside down hanging tomato planters available; but you can also grow peppers, beans, peas and cucumbers and squash (pretty much anything that is a bush or vine) in them as well. You can make them easily from recycled 2 liter bottles or 2-5 gallon buckets.



And cherry/grape tomatoes grow great in hanging peat/wire baskets, and I imagine that mini peppers or cukes would as well.



They even have hanging planters for strawberries, that would probably work great for herbs or salad greens.


With a little ingenuity and some drip/soaker hoses, it wouldn't be too hard to keep any of these watered.

For larger/heavier plants like broccoli, cauliflower, and head cabbage or plants that need deeper soil (like potatoes and root veg); you can use conventional pots or try some of the newer grow bags...



or just slit the bag of topsoil and and grow them right in there (as mentioned earlier).



Or grow them in a heavy canvas or burlap tote bag


Last edited by MissingAll4Seasons; 11-07-2012 at 02:26 PM.. Reason: fixing broken image links
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2012, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,617,662 times
Reputation: 3358
There are also plenty of dwarf fruiting trees and shrubs that can be grown in containers and kept pruned as edible topiary. These would be great for apartment balconies, or townhouse porches, or even in a larger yard or garden that gets just a bit too cold in the winter so the trees need to come inside or into a greenhouse.







More info:
9 Tips for Growing Container Trees - Urban Farm Online
Planting Dwarf Fruit Trees
Dwarf Fruit Trees Perfect for the Apartment Garden
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2012, 02:44 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,133,594 times
Reputation: 12760
Came across this website the other day: UrbanFarmOnline.com - Sustainable city living at your fingertips
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-10-2012, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
9,605 posts, read 18,802,940 times
Reputation: 8462
This is concrete blocks stacked the week after Christmas, half rotted tree chippings mixed with some topsoil and about three buckets of semi-composted "bunny berries" (rabbit manure from under the rabbit hutch). A tablespoon full of Epsom salts was sprinkled around the base of each tomato plant after it was planted but other than that, it's all bunny manure. It gets watered a lot since it's very densely planted and the plants use a lot of water and fertilizer. More semi-composted bunny manure it put on it about every two weeks.


The beans, lettuce, beets and watermelon were direct seeded. The sweet potato was from vine cuttings and the tomatoes were started inside on the first week of January. This picture was taken around the end of February so it's a six week old garden.

The next one is going to be three rows of bricks high so it will be easier to pick things like bush beans. We got most of the bricks for it today, gotta move a few bushes out of the way and then we can start stacking concrete blocks and hauling semi-composted chipped trees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:37 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top