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Old 06-21-2013, 07:57 PM
 
939 posts, read 3,076,985 times
Reputation: 619

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Why_Am_I_Here View Post
Not sure if it was said....but running the radio, heat, AC etc...takes life out of the battery as well. You quickly lose power when listening to NPR on your way to Trader Joes!
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCforever View Post
LOL, people post the damnest nonsense on message boards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Why_Am_I_Here View Post
I used one for my job..so did my co-workers, so I think we know what we are talking about. We all had the same issues. So.....now what you got?
You make it sound like it's a deal breaker. It's not as quick as you imply. I'll reiterate what DC said... LOL, people post the damnest nonsense on message boards.
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Old 06-21-2013, 10:52 PM
 
Location: SWFL
22,756 posts, read 19,196,021 times
Reputation: 20879
Quote:
Originally Posted by verybadgnome View Post
So the break even point is 129KM or about 80,000 miles. EVs should have no problem doing that since there are many 10 year old plus Priuses with their original batteries. The article did not state where the electricity was coming from either and what would happen if Nuclear or renewables were used.

And what about the other benefits such as reduced CO, SO, and particulate emissions? And the lack of motor oil in parking lots running into our streams and rivers? And please give me proof of this:

"Many electric cars are expected to need a replacement battery after a few years."

I have not heard of Teslas needing new batteries so what are they referring to?

I don't know if this has been addressed yet but using the brakes on the Prius is what charges the battery. Mine was an '05.
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Old 06-24-2013, 07:43 AM
 
Location: West Orange, NJ
12,545 posts, read 18,378,469 times
Reputation: 3688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Why_Am_I_Here View Post
Not sure if it was said....but running the radio, heat, AC etc...takes life out of the battery as well. You quickly lose power when listening to NPR on your way to Trader Joes!
yes, those all consume more gas too. what's your point, exactly?
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Old 06-25-2013, 05:44 PM
 
Location: California
51 posts, read 86,481 times
Reputation: 59
Quote:
I used one for my job..so did my co-workers, so I think we know what we are talking about. We all had the same issues. So.....now what you got?
That sir is the nature of batteries,you probably use a cell phone that needs constant recharging too but that doesn't stop people from using them,they will use whatever is convenient.
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Old 06-25-2013, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Under a bridge
2,423 posts, read 3,129,573 times
Reputation: 2486
Quote:
Originally Posted by EEtechs View Post
Finally, for you guys that want electric cars: You should consider that a battery requires multiple parts to make it, which always puts them at a cost disadvantage and they wear out over time; whereas Gasoline is just simply one of the many hydrocarbon compounds that make up crude oil that is made by the process of fractional distillation of crude oil. Now if they can create a battery that is the tank that you fill up with some non-toxic fluid that goes down as the battery is used up, and the battery cell tank can last at least 25 years, then I could see electric cars taking off. But until then, I think gas powered cars are going to be here a while, irrespective of how polluting they are.
As battery technology for EVs continues to evolve, batteries will be more efficient, less expensive, cleaner and safer for the environment including the manufacturing of EVs. Just like gasoline and gasoline cars are cleaner and more efficient now than they were even 15 years ago, including the very same buildings where they're manufactured, the same will apply with EVs and batteries.

-Cheers!
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Old 06-27-2013, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Somewhere out there
9,616 posts, read 11,338,459 times
Reputation: 3735
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunwilt View Post
They say once you go EV you will never go back........... to a vehicle that needs ,tune-ups,oil changes,new mufflers,a gas tank that holds flammable liquids,and doesn't spew carbon monoxide into the air you breathe.
As many here are disputing however, the energy to "reload" your shiny new EV has to come from somewhere. There is no such thing as a free lunch. If the current community of gas or diesel-powered vehicles, possibly including mid-sized (up to, say,30,000 lb... ) commercial vehicles, all plug in at once, and mostly in the evenings, there will be a very distinct "DDDdddOooooooooo" sound as the country goes dim in a wave travelling east to west.

This does not include the impact on the existing electrical demand from lighting, AC systems, elevators in buildings, and so on.

Again, it's not a "free lunch" kind of thing. Indeed, the imagined source of this vastly significant new load also has to come from somewhere, now doesn't it? Increased output from new coal-fired central power sites, or from neighborhood or municipal PV setups, would be mandatory, but also new transmission lines would have to be added into our already fragile and aged grid.

Ditto for a renewed interest and push for Big Biz nuke plants. More hydroelectric dams? Yikes!! (as an environmental engineer for a major Western Canadian hydroelectric power company some years ago, I saw the gleam in the eyes of hydro development engineers when the idea of staunching the natural flow of yet another river was discussed! They were like bully kids at a schoolyard marbles tournament...).

It's a significant and exponentially more complex project than our current state of affairs (which is not to say what we have now is a good solution, but petrochemicals coming from several dozen major refineries located all over N. America does provide a certain level of energy independence versus hoping there is no failure in some major N-S or W-E transmission grid.), and is by no means THE answer, unfortunately.

NOTE: Has anyone considered radically reducing the population of personal vehicles, or the population that expects that they will automatically own their own personal transportation device, in the future? As with our upcoming teenage generation in the next few decades?
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Old 06-27-2013, 08:29 PM
 
1,871 posts, read 1,657,330 times
Reputation: 2865
My biggest problem with electric cars is they are only able to go so far before needing a charge. Then it takes time to recharge the batteries. How is one able to drive long distances when you are traveling, especially cross country in the US? When I am traveling I like to go for at least 10 hours of driving time. End the subsidies on electric cars. If the market wants electric cars let it work. If not let people buy what they want. This is an important part of being an adult, making choices and learning about the choices you make and then ultimately living with those choices.

Charlie.
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Old 06-28-2013, 07:27 AM
 
Location: DC
6,505 posts, read 6,424,922 times
Reputation: 3102
Quote:
Originally Posted by rifleman View Post
As many here are disputing however, the energy to "reload" your shiny new EV has to come from somewhere. There is no such thing as a free lunch. If the current community of gas or diesel-powered vehicles, possibly including mid-sized (up to, say,30,000 lb... ) commercial vehicles, all plug in at once, and mostly in the evenings, there will be a very distinct "DDDdddOooooooooo" sound as the country goes dim in a wave travelling east to west.

This does not include the impact on the existing electrical demand from lighting, AC systems, elevators in buildings, and so on.

Again, it's not a "free lunch" kind of thing. Indeed, the imagined source of this vastly significant new load also has to come from somewhere, now doesn't it? Increased output from new coal-fired central power sites, or from neighborhood or municipal PV setups, would be mandatory, but also new transmission lines would have to be added into our already fragile and aged grid.

Ditto for a renewed interest and push for Big Biz nuke plants. More hydroelectric dams? Yikes!! (as an environmental engineer for a major Western Canadian hydroelectric power company some years ago, I saw the gleam in the eyes of hydro development engineers when the idea of staunching the natural flow of yet another river was discussed! They were like bully kids at a schoolyard marbles tournament...).

It's a significant and exponentially more complex project than our current state of affairs (which is not to say what we have now is a good solution, but petrochemicals coming from several dozen major refineries located all over N. America does provide a certain level of energy independence versus hoping there is no failure in some major N-S or W-E transmission grid.), and is by no means THE answer, unfortunately.

NOTE: Has anyone considered radically reducing the population of personal vehicles, or the population that expects that they will automatically own their own personal transportation device, in the future? As with our upcoming teenage generation in the next few decades?
Wow, I don't think I've ever seen so much incorrect information crammed into such a small post.

Implying that plugging EVs into the electrical grd at night is going to cause a problem couldn't be more wrong. There's a tremendous amount of excess capacity available at night since the system is sized based upon the hottest day in the summer. That is true for both transmission and generation capacity.


If you charge an EV from the output of a coal fired electric generation plant, it's still cleaner than a gasoline powered car.

Petroleum for any given area of the country comes from just a handful of refineries, while electricity comes from literally thousands of plant spread throughout the United States. The electric generation and transmission system is both more reliable and more diverse than the liquid fuels infrastructure.
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Old 06-28-2013, 07:30 AM
 
Location: DC
6,505 posts, read 6,424,922 times
Reputation: 3102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rangerdude_Charlie View Post
My biggest problem with electric cars is they are only able to go so far before needing a charge. Then it takes time to recharge the batteries. How is one able to drive long distances when you are traveling, especially cross country in the US? When I am traveling I like to go for at least 10 hours of driving time. End the subsidies on electric cars. If the market wants electric cars let it work. If not let people buy what they want. This is an important part of being an adult, making choices and learning about the choices you make and then ultimately living with those choices.

Charlie.
EVs are designed to be commuter cars. Most people's car usage is back and forth to work.
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Old 06-28-2013, 08:36 AM
 
Location: West Orange, NJ
12,545 posts, read 18,378,469 times
Reputation: 3688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rangerdude_Charlie View Post
My biggest problem with electric cars is they are only able to go so far before needing a charge. Then it takes time to recharge the batteries. How is one able to drive long distances when you are traveling, especially cross country in the US? When I am traveling I like to go for at least 10 hours of driving time. End the subsidies on electric cars. If the market wants electric cars let it work. If not let people buy what they want. This is an important part of being an adult, making choices and learning about the choices you make and then ultimately living with those choices.

Charlie.
well, a gas vehicle is only able to go so far before a fill up, and it takes 4 minutes to fill up a car. with Tesla's battery swap, it takes 93 seconds to "charge" a Tesla. Or, it takes 20 minutes to charge it. Take a leak, pick up a sandwich, and you're pretty close to fully charged.

End the subsidies on oil and gas and we can end them on electric cars. also, price in all the costs for oil into the actual purchase. so instead of paying taxes to fund the security in the straight of hormuz, add a gas tax that pays for our military presence there.

then we'll see what people would buy.
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