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Old 06-22-2011, 08:53 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,690,021 times
Reputation: 1869

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnolia Bloom View Post
I think your wife should hang your dirty clothing on the clothesline to air it out, then put them back in your dresser. My kids use towels once. I just dry them out, refold and put them in their rooms to use again. Much better, IMO, than washing them in old wash water.

I only wash clothing that need it. Who would want to wash clothes in dirty wash water?
Ho ho ho. I wear many clothes several times before they are laundered. And as for the "dirty water" it's been done. I'm tough, not scared of a few little germs. OTOH I know a woman who uses a towel once then throws it into the dirty clothes. To me that is just wasteful. I can use mine for 2 weeks.
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Old 06-22-2011, 09:38 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,425,411 times
Reputation: 7641
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
How so? Have you ever heard of bathing 2 kids in the same bathwater? Same thing.

By the way-this is mostly a suggestion. Trying to brainstorm for water and energy saving ways. Of course it is not for everybody but it could work for some. that is the trouble today-people want to save resources but unfortunately don't want to sacrifice anything. Nada. Nothing.
Did you do any research on gray water usage?

Oh, I get it, he speeds so it's OK for me to speed too.....

Saving resources is great, but lets also understand some things that look on the surface as a good idea might have legal ramifications.

Taking a shower outside to water the lawn at the same time is another great idea on the surface....
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Old 06-22-2011, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Itinerant
6,261 posts, read 4,178,219 times
Reputation: 4759
Quote:
Originally Posted by plwhit View Post
No,

~ it's because they take their kids to sports or after school events.

~ It's because they take the time and repair things that are broken.

~ It's because they get spend their leisure time in community or church events.

~ It's because they have to work two jobs.

~ It's because there are more worthwhile/important things to do in life today than individually wring the families clothes out and hang them on a line after getting home from work.

Why do you have this attitude? Because your friends live that style of life and you're jealous?

I'm amazed with your attitude you spend time-wasting activities like reading C-D which is completely unproductive.....
Lets see, hmm when people did laundry with wringers..

They didn't take their kids to sports or after school events I assume...

They didn't take time to repair things...

They didn't go to church and/or community events...

They didn't need to work two jobs...

They didn't have friends and family to visit, hobbies to pursue, training and education to complete...

Interesting, since much of what we use today is disposable, when was the last time you repaired a coffee maker, or a toaster over going out and spending $20-30 on a replacement? Happened quite a bit back in the day. Church attendances have also fallen.

I don't have any attitude, I'm just trying to figure out where all the time gained by labor saving devices is being spent. Historically the average American is working fewer hours than they have in their history, have more labor saving devices, and more prepared foods, yet don't have time to do things that were done 60 years ago. Not that they should, but if people have better things to do today than they did back when wringers were common, what are these things? Come on it can't be difficult to provide some kind of rational listing, that can't be poked full of holes in mere seconds.

I'm jealous of nothing, I'm 42, retired two years ago, and probably have a higher monthly income than you do. I have an additional 9 hours minimum a day over someone who's employed (when you include commuting time) to do whatever the hell I like, and am.
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Old 06-22-2011, 10:18 PM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,690,021 times
Reputation: 1869
Quote:
Originally Posted by plwhit View Post
Did you do any research on gray water usage?

Oh, I get it, he speeds so it's OK for me to speed too.....

Saving resources is great, but lets also understand some things that look on the surface as a good idea might have legal ramifications.

Taking a shower outside to water the lawn at the same time is another great idea on the surface....
I did skim through some sites I googled like one in NM and one in CO. I never knew there was so much to it. We have very little regulation of it wherer I live, but that is not to say it won't happen esp. if the feds kick in. I must be pretty lucky not having to deal with gray water regs (yet). Like everything else in the modern world, regulation and legal rams are going to be the end of us.

But say for example, you decide to go live back in the woods somewhere. You can do that stuff; nobody will bother you. Use your washwater twice then go ahead and water something like houseplants which like that PH you have created. Personally I would never re-use dishwater as it is nasty; I believe that it is classed as "blackwater" if I read it right.
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Old 06-22-2011, 10:34 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,425,411 times
Reputation: 7641
Funny, the soap to wash dishes is environmentally safe, the debris on the plates and utensils you just ate or put in your mouth so why is the water so nasty?

The bathwater might have #1 or miniscule flecks of #2 in it (being polite here) but you'll reuse that water...

Makes no sense unless the water you are using to wash your dishes is also the water you used to take a bath/shower.....

Back to the OP, even the car washes used to have those wringers which I always used...

Now all they do is sell paper drying towels

And this is progress?
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Old 06-23-2011, 08:03 AM
 
Location: central Indiana
220 posts, read 387,289 times
Reputation: 162
I have a wringer washer with electric wringer, in my garage. No, I'm not currently using it, but when I had the chance to buy it several years ago, it was too good a deal to pass up. I even have a small washboard to use if needed for badly grass-stained knees.

I did use a wringer washer for many years during the 60's and 70's. They are sparing of total water usage, since you don't need to drain the machine after each load. The idea was that you started washday with hot water and white clothes. There is water loss during the wringing process, so water might be added to the machine during times of heavy usage. Each successive load of laundry was darker in color, with jeans usually being the last items to be cleaned. Extra soap was added as needed.
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Old 06-24-2011, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Not where you ever lived
11,544 posts, read 26,011,458 times
Reputation: 6248
OP.. I think if you buy a manual wringer washer and your wife does not understand: it will take longe to*do*laundry, be more physically demanding, the clothes may not be as clean, your wife will spend more time ironing and she will be more*tired - you'll get a divorce.

I remember doing this*as a child. It was an all day job to wash, hang, bring the dry clothes in and fold and bag the damp clothes. The next day was devoted to ironing everything cotton. It usually consumed 4 or 5 hours.

Most eco-friendly soap is not made to use with wringer washers.
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Old 06-24-2011, 06:21 PM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,425,411 times
Reputation: 7641
Quote:
Originally Posted by linicx View Post
OP.. I think if you buy a manual wringer washer and your wife does not understand: it will take longe to*do*laundry, be more physically demanding, the clothes may not be as clean, your wife will spend more time ironing and she will be more*tired - you'll get a divorce.

I remember doing this*as a child. It was an all day job to wash, hang, bring the dry clothes in and fold and bag the damp clothes. The next day was devoted to ironing everything cotton. It usually consumed 4 or 5 hours.

Most eco-friendly soap is not made to use with wringer washers.

One thing though, you just can't beat the smell of clothes that have dried on the clothesline in the sun
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Old 06-28-2011, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Cute Little Town in PA
17 posts, read 90,544 times
Reputation: 25
I'm looking into getting a james washer unless I find something similar that I like used. We got 2 twin beds and use several small lightweight blankets so there is never anything too difficult for either of us to wrangle and we also do small loads, one blanket at a time. I'm still using the electric spin on my washer because I have no wringer. We don't wear jeans or bulky fabrics so I can't imagine a wringer, properly constructed and maintained, would be a problem for anyone able-bodied enough to split a few logs here and there? I can't imagine pulling sodden cotton quilts through a wringer, tho, no wonder they were hated.
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Old 06-28-2011, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,492 posts, read 51,399,522 times
Reputation: 24613
I remember Wash Day when I was a preschool. It took my mother all day to wash a weeks’ worth of cloths, sheets and towels. She used the whites first while reusing the water because she had to heat the water on the stove. The wringer was a nasty piece of work and far more dangerous than the power tools my step dad used. Overall wash day was a giant PIA.

I vastly prefer the modern convenience of an automatic clothes washer and dryer. Way less wasted time and effort. If you have enough electric power to operate an automatic washer do so. Use a gas heated dryer or a clothes line. Most modern clothes washers actually use less water than a wringer machine.

Life is too short to waste it on chores.
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