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Old 07-13-2011, 04:20 PM
 
1,339 posts, read 996,818 times
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A neighbor is planning on trimming some trees that I know has at l least two
pairs of nesting robins. I would think this would be a violation of Federal law.
Does anyone know who to contact to find out?
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Old 07-13-2011, 04:53 PM
 
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US Fish and Wildlife, and inform your neighbors that they are, in fact, breaking the law. The Robin is protected under the Migratory Bird Act.
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Old 07-14-2011, 10:08 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
17,785 posts, read 53,968,601 times
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This is mid-July, fergoodnesssake. Robins are early nesters, and in most areas of the country the fledglings should be leaving the nest or have already left. Your zeal seems over-reaching. FWIW, robins wouldn't be as plentiful as they are if not for people opening up fields and open spaces. Trimming is part of opening up spaces.
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Old 07-14-2011, 05:15 PM
 
1,339 posts, read 996,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
This is mid-July, fergoodnesssake. Robins are early nesters, and in most areas of the country the fledglings should be leaving the nest or have already left. Your zeal seems over-reaching. FWIW, robins wouldn't be as plentiful as they are if not for people opening up fields and open spaces. Trimming is part of opening up spaces.
Ah, sage advice from a true birdbrain!

Attracting American Robins in spring. The Robin nesting and feeding habits

American Robins can produce three successful broods in one year. On average, though, only 40 percent of nests successfully produce young.

2 - 3 broods raised each season
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Old 07-15-2011, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
17,785 posts, read 53,968,601 times
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I've considered this overnight, looking at it from various angles.

First, thank you for calling me a birdbrain. I must take that as a compliment, since personal attacks are against the TOS and, had you done it as an attack, you would be preening a rather ugly side of your character.

Second, good luck at getting the Feds out to chastise your neighbor. Somehow, I think they have better things to do.

Now let's get down to the nitty gritty. Robins are in no way endangered. They have multiple broods, but can have periods in between, where tree trimming is not an issue. Instead of going to your neighbor, and in a neighborly fashion saying, "Would you mind waiting to trim until this group of nestlings has fledged?" you want to invoke the Migratory Bird Act. Talk about over-reaction.

In addition to being incredibly rude, that is a total abuse of the act, taxpayer money, and common sense. There are birds that DO need serious protection. By diverting attention to your personal problem, you divert resources and time. You also make a number of us less and less receptive to any further attempts to legislate wildlife protection, exactly because of the type of abuse you wish to accomplish.

I suggest that you reconsider your motives and your actions. (Why do I suspect you and your neighbor may be feuding?) If you still wish to call the Feds, be prepared for your every move to be scrutinized by your neighbor and the police called if you park your car more than six inches from the curb.

Also if you succeed, I would be interested in promoting legislation protecting earthworms (which are supposedly good for the soil) from the predation of robins. Perhaps having a robin nest on the property can also be declared illegal.
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