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Old 08-02-2011, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Between Seattle and Portland
1,266 posts, read 2,842,430 times
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I grew up with Mom hanging wet clothes out on a simple clothesline between two T-poles, and I have fond memories of my job to hand her the clothespins and how wonderful the clothes smelled after being dried in the sun.

Things have become more complicated in choosing how to air-dry your laundry today, in an effort to save on energy costs. I thought I'd share a good site that reviews the options for air-drying:

Air dry washing - TipThePlanet

There's some really clever concepts there, including pictures. I especially like the no-clothespin approach called EzyLine and wonder if it really would support the weight of heavy wet blue jeans...

What's your style for air-drying? Why did you choose it?
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Old 08-02-2011, 10:16 AM
 
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WOOOOW! What a website.

All on clothes drying. THAT is amazing.

To answer your question -- I throw the towels and my tee/work shirts and jeans out all over the lawn furniture.

But the kids like their stuff tumble dried.
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Old 08-02-2011, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
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We live in an apartment above the office of the business my wife manages, so trips up and down to ground level to hang clothes on a clothesline would be rather inconvenient.

So I attached a piece of PVC pipe to one of the corner posts on the deck outside our back door and dropped an umbrella-style clothesline pole in it. It works great and is handy as heck.
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Old 08-02-2011, 01:08 PM
 
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I have a foldable, umbrella style clothesline that I ordered through Ace Hardware. My husband dug a hole in the backyard and set a piece of pvc pipe in the hole using quik-crete. My clothes line pole fits down in the pvc, but can be removed if the weather is windy.

I also grew up with clothes, towels, and sheets that were line dried. I love saving money and I love that fresh smell.
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Old 08-02-2011, 01:53 PM
 
Location: earth?
7,288 posts, read 10,851,419 times
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I have a question about clothes drying and "that fresh smell." I remember such a smell from my childhood, but when I tried it, the clothes were stiff as a board and did not have "that fresh smell." Maybe it was because of air pollution or something? At the time, I lived in a high dessert area that was prone to sandstorms, so maybe that was the problem?

I would think the air quality would be a big factor.
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Old 08-02-2011, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Between Seattle and Portland
1,266 posts, read 2,842,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imcurious View Post
I have a question about clothes drying and "that fresh smell." I remember such a smell from my childhood, but when I tried it, the clothes were stiff as a board and did not have "that fresh smell." Maybe it was because of air pollution or something? At the time, I lived in a high dessert area that was prone to sandstorms, so maybe that was the problem?

I would think the air quality would be a big factor.
Hmmm... Maybe my Mom followed some of these tips and I just wasn't aware of it:

Like the idea of line drying clothes, but hate how stiff everything feels afterwards? Then, check out these five tricks for perfect, crunch-free clothes:

1. Add a cup of white vinegar to your wash cycle to help dissolve the laundry detergent.
2. Cut the amount of detergent that you use. Half the recommended amount is usually plenty.
3. Run your clothes in the dryer for 10 minutes, before putting them out on the line.
4. Shake out your clothes before hanging them.
5. Hang your clothes out on a windy day.

How to Keep Line-Dried Clothes from Getting Stiff

I DO remember Mom taking down the clothes from the line before they were completely dry, so maybe a bit of residual moisture helps reduce the stiffness.
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Old 08-02-2011, 08:07 PM
 
236 posts, read 749,587 times
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We had a couple of parallel clothes lines running across our kitchen growing up, about a foot below the ceiling. The flannel sheets were hung up there to dry overnight, during the winter. And other items, with clothespins. We had bent wire clothes hangers for hanging pants, attached with clothespins. It kept the electric bill down. I still take advantage of the dry indoor air in the winter and air dry clothes. They last a lot longer... I don't think many people realize how rough the dryer is on fabrics.
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Old 08-02-2011, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,175 posts, read 16,641,473 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by That Ottawa One View Post
We had a couple of parallel clothes lines running across our kitchen growing up, about a foot below the ceiling. The flannel sheets were hung up there to dry overnight, during the winter. And other items, with clothespins. We had bent wire clothes hangers for hanging pants, attached with clothespins. It kept the electric bill down. I still take advantage of the dry indoor air in the winter and air dry clothes. They last a lot longer... I don't think many people realize how rough the dryer is on fabrics.
Drying clothes like this in the winter puts a lot of humidity in the air, too. When I was a kid we have a wood burning furnace in the basement that heated the whole house through one huge register in the living room. We would dry the clothes on one of those wooden drying racks over that register.
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Old 08-02-2011, 08:24 PM
 
766 posts, read 1,158,207 times
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A little tip for everybody. Once your wash load is complete. Run it thru the wash cycle again WITHOUT DETERGENT! Except this time, once the load has had a chance to agitate for awhile, lift the lid and CHECK the water for soap suds.

I've had plenty of people astonished at the soap residue they have on their clothes.
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Old 08-02-2011, 09:08 PM
 
Location: Cute Little Town in PA
17 posts, read 90,491 times
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^ This is why I no longer use a washing machine, I wash by hand.
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