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Old 03-08-2012, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Midwest
2,975 posts, read 2,111,821 times
Reputation: 1862
Organic fruits taste no different than the regular fruit.
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Old 03-08-2012, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
2,312 posts, read 1,587,167 times
Reputation: 4998
All this arguing is making me hungry.
I'm going to eat a couple of Johnsonville brat's with some sauerkraut.
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Old 03-08-2012, 10:35 AM
 
2,737 posts, read 894,293 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by julian17033 View Post
All this arguing is making me hungry.
I'm going to eat a couple of Johnsonville brat's with some sauerkraut.
It danged well better be organic kraut!

Mehh, whatever... It's just rotten cabbage anyway.
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Old 03-08-2012, 02:32 PM
 
5,567 posts, read 7,859,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
Right. Yes, that's part of my point.

The "green crowd" that I hear the most cacophonous comments from are against ANYTHING not grown "naturally" - thus, they would stridently object to food grown in greenhouses, etc. And they would HATE hydroponics. "Natural or nothing!"

I just wonder if they've really thought the whole thing through.
I know many people who consider themselves "green" and they applaud hydroponics and utilize greenhouses - why do you think they would snub things that help them to grow their own food?

When I worked at Whole Foods throughout the 90's and early 00's we were constantly having people call us asking if we sold grow lights and drip irrigation systems. I worked the customer service booth and we actually kept a list at the desk of numbers to give them to call for places that did sell those things. lol Quite a few of the "old-timers" that I worked with had amazing greenhouses at their homes that they built themselves using things like PVC piping for the structure and ... I dunno what for the clear plastic sheeting... maybe vinyl... I dunno. But it was elaborate. It's awesome what people can grow themselves even in their own tiny little yards. I just have a small covered patio and one of the things I grow is broccoli in a 5 gallon bucket... tons of broccoli. I give it away because I can't use it up quick enough.

I'm in "green" Oregon and I have never heard or seen anyone snubbing that stuff. Where did you hear that?
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Old 03-08-2012, 02:35 PM
 
5,567 posts, read 7,859,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nyanna View Post
Organic fruits taste no different than the regular fruit.
Sooooo not true. You should do a blind taste test sometime.

Of course - some people have a more sensitive palate than others, too. My hubby, who was a long-time smoker - only tastes a difference with bananas and apples. I have never smoked, and I have a very sensitive palate, and you can blindfold me and I'll tell you which piece of lettuce is organic and which is not. I can taste the difference in most things. Even wine, chocolate, and processed foods like that.
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Old 03-08-2012, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Vermont
4,650 posts, read 8,694,814 times
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i was just looking at the johnny's seed catalog. for like $500 you can build a 65' x 12' tall tunnel. I definitely hope to have one of these when I get a bit more land. i am doing some very small scale tests with hydroponics now, but hope to expand.

here is the material
Tufflite IV
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Old 03-08-2012, 03:32 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,723 posts, read 5,060,306 times
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In many cases, the taste differences aren't down to the product being organic vs. conventional, but more down to the varieties that are grown using each method.

The fact that the commercial variety is "flavorless" is normally down to the fact that the desired traits bred/engineered for in that variety are fast growth, appearance, uniformity, ease of cultivation/harvest/transport and length of storage... not flavor, as is often the case with "heirloom" varieties.

The fact that most conventional farmers don't grow the (arguably) more flavorful heirloom varieties because they are often difficult to industrialize, and that many (non-industrialized) organic farmers have opted to do so, is orthoganol. The commercial variety grown by an industrial farmer would most likely taste the same regardless of whether that farmer grew organically or conventionally. This has been noticed by consumers of "organic" supermarket produce supplied by the larger agro-biz farms already.
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Old 03-08-2012, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
4,909 posts, read 4,814,560 times
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When I first tried buying organic, I vowed to keep my food budget the same for a month. I'd shop at Trader Joe, Whole Foods, etc. but I could not spend more money than before on food. If I didn't have enough, then I would eat less. And after a month, I felt that my well being increased after eating less food but of higher quality.
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Old 03-08-2012, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,723 posts, read 5,060,306 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
When I first tried buying organic, I vowed to keep my food budget the same for a month. I'd shop at Trader Joe, Whole Foods, etc. but I could not spend more money than before on food. If I didn't have enough, then I would eat less. And after a month, I felt that my well being increased after eating less food but of higher quality.
I noticed that as well. The increased cost of purchasing higher quality, minimally processed, wholesome food was offset by the fact that I didn't need to eat as much because it was more nutritious (regardless of growing method). I found that while some things were more expensive, others were actually less expensive depending on how I got them (U-Pick or farm direct vs. supermarket), but it all pretty much evened out in the end. However, I can see how predatory producers jumping on the Green Bandwagon could easily jack prices up for something that really isn't any better and the Born-Again-Greenies with disposable income really wouldn't know any better. Most folks who know what they're looking at and don't have money to throw around have found honest producers with reasonable prices.

While I usually opt to buy organically grown, heirloom produce from local farmers for several reasons; I still prefer spending a little more for minimally processed produce (regardless of origin or method) over the cheaper packaged junk or foods laden with artificial colorants and preservatives.

For me, the order of importance with whole produce and animal products is 1) local because it's fresher, directly benefits my community, and I can go to the farm if I want to see for myself; 2) organically grown or naturally-raised/organically fed because I have some severe sensitivities to many chemicals and I feel it is more ecologically responsible; and 3) heirloom/non-commercial cultivars because I prefer the taste, variety and it helps ensure genetic diversity.
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Old 03-08-2012, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
21,518 posts, read 27,137,267 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe moving View Post
i was just looking at the johnny's seed catalog. for like $500 you can build a 65' x 12' tall tunnel. I definitely hope to have one of these when I get a bit more land. i am doing some very small scale tests with hydroponics now, but hope to expand.

here is the material
Tufflite IV
Some of their stuff is really expensive.

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