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Old 04-17-2012, 09:12 AM
 
137 posts, read 344,973 times
Reputation: 54

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I recently completed a project that included private home owners on the upper west side of NYC. (Townhomes/Brownstones) The idea being pushed is for home owners to remove the current slabs of concrete they have in their back yards and have it replaced with green space (grass/dirt). This in turn will reduce the amount of run off water, flooding, and is more sustainable (etc.). BUT, the coordinator wants the city to give subsidies to the home owners which will entice them to actually update their backyards.

Do you think this is a good concept?

Are there other (cheaper) ways to have private home owners create sustainable yards?

This is specifically for urban areas such as the upper west side of NYC where I previously researched.

Any ideas?

Thanks!!

Last edited by lcouncil; 04-17-2012 at 09:40 AM..
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Old 04-17-2012, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 25,466,525 times
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No subsidies!

Make these changes because you want to and can afford them. The government should not intervene to distort the reasons people do things.
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Watkinsville, GA
381 posts, read 927,939 times
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No.

No subsidies for anyone for anything.

Folks always have their hand out.
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Old 04-17-2012, 01:50 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,111,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
No subsidies!

Make these changes because you want to and can afford them. The government should not intervene to distort the reasons people do things.

^^^ This!^^^
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Old 04-17-2012, 02:19 PM
 
137 posts, read 344,973 times
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I agree. I spoke to my old intern coordinator (the one that conducted the research on sustainable yards) about this and her argument was that the city will benefit from this because less run-off water will go into the sewer system, which in turn, less money will be used to clean the water that's in the sewer system. (I think that was her logic)

But I just wanted other perspectives because I thought maybe I was just being cheap or unrealistic..

But Thanks!
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Old 04-17-2012, 02:30 PM
 
2,737 posts, read 4,320,162 times
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Maybe some small property tax break, in order to get people off center, but no subsidies.

If they can't see the benefit of doing this for the sake of the environment, they're not going to take care of their yard after they've converted it back to plant life.
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Old 04-17-2012, 02:38 PM
 
Location: New England
398 posts, read 580,960 times
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I vote tax break. They give tax breaks for other "sustainability"-related reasons like owning/creating a wildlife habitat on your property, so why not for this? No subsidy, I don't want to be paying for someone else's enjoyment of their own private yard, what do the rest of us really get out of that?
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Old 04-17-2012, 02:41 PM
 
Location: DC
6,510 posts, read 6,430,643 times
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We get taxed now in DC for having hardscape rather than permeable pavement.
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Old 04-17-2012, 04:05 PM
 
Location: WA
4,246 posts, read 7,823,639 times
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In the area I live in, there's a huge education campaign by the city and county about how to create "rain gardens" and use native landscaping. Local organizations give lectures and they hand out a lot of brochures about it at festivals and things. I think it works pretty well.
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Old 04-18-2012, 04:12 AM
 
39,214 posts, read 40,596,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lcouncil View Post
I agree. I spoke to my old intern coordinator (the one that conducted the research on sustainable yards) about this and her argument was that the city will benefit from this because less run-off water will go into the sewer system, which in turn, less money will be used to clean the water that's in the sewer system. (I think that was her logic)
Storm water and sewer systems are separate or should be, the water in storm water drains is not treated.
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