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Old 06-03-2012, 02:24 PM
 
Location: On the brink of WWIII
21,093 posts, read 23,892,293 times
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I am no biology major, but I did learn about how organisms adapt to their environment.
Science 101 says if an organism is exposed to an adverse stimulus, it will eventually develop the ability to overcome the adversion.


The EPA's experts also are suggesting that the agency reconsider its approval of a new kind of rootworm-killing corn, which Monsanto calls SmartStax. This new version of Bt corn includes two different Bt genes that are supposed to kill the rootworm in different ways. This should help prevent resistance from emerging, and the EPA is allowing farmers to plant it on up to 95 percent of their corn acres. But if one of those genes is already compromised… such a high percentage of Bt corn could rapidly produce insects that are resistant to the second one, too."


First Super WEEDS, now SUPER insects
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Old 06-03-2012, 08:40 PM
 
2,737 posts, read 4,338,586 times
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Ho Hum. Yet another Monsanto bashing thread.

If you're the agricultural expert you claim to be, you'd know that a very small percentage of all "pests" (weeds, insects, etc.) will be immune to what kills the majority of the species. Those "mutants" will reproduce instead of dying, spawning more "resistant" pests. This is nothing new.
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Old 06-04-2012, 10:07 AM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,190,235 times
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I attended a beekeeping class recently. The instructor was in no way political but he did warn people not to make bee feed from Kayro Syrup. Apparently millions of bees have been killed and the syrup tested uses as feed in hives did contain the pesticide residue from being made from GMO corn with the pesticide already in the seed. The USDA won't come out with a statement yet (suprise, suprise).
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Old 06-04-2012, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 34,386,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lifelongMOgal View Post
I attended a beekeeping class recently. The instructor was in no way political but he did warn people not to make bee feed from Kayro Syrup. Apparently millions of bees have been killed and the syrup tested uses as feed in hives did contain the pesticide residue from being made from GMO corn with the pesticide already in the seed. The USDA won't come out with a statement yet (suprise, suprise).
That's extremely interesting...
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Old 06-04-2012, 01:00 PM
 
833 posts, read 1,470,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
That's extremely interesting...
and full of BALONEY !
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Old 06-04-2012, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,632,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
Ho Hum. Yet another Monsanto bashing thread.

If you're the agricultural expert you claim to be, you'd know that a very small percentage of all "pests" (weeds, insects, etc.) will be immune to what kills the majority of the species. Those "mutants" will reproduce instead of dying, spawning more "resistant" pests. This is nothing new.
So, what, exactly, are we gaining from engineering these temporarily resistant GMO crops in the first place? I mean besides even more resistant weeds and pests?
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Old 06-04-2012, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,309 posts, read 34,386,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redwolf fan View Post
and full of BALONEY !
Maybe, I'm not sure. I'm thinking that you're not sure either.

There has been some vetted research indicating that exposure to low levels of neonicotinoids over time can replicate colony collapse. I'm quite sure that no one knows enough to dismiss that out of hand as baloney.

I merely know enough to call it interesting...
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:12 PM
 
2,737 posts, read 4,338,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingAll4Seasons View Post
So, what, exactly, are we gaining from engineering these temporarily resistant GMO crops in the first place? I mean besides even more resistant weeds and pests?
Let me start with RoundUp Ready Seeds - which have been on the market for over a quarter-century. Here are some of the benefits:
1. Farmers use less herbicides than ever before.
2. Because RoundUp is a contact herbicide, it does not go into the soil (like pre-emergent herbicides do), and subsequently leach down into the water table.
3. Farmers do not need to cultivate their fields - which keeps moisture in because the soil is not disturbed, minimizes erosion, and allows them to use roughly 1/3rd the amount of fuel previously used to produce crops (think air pollution here).
4. Because they don't need to cultivate their crops, and risk having last year's crop residue clog cultivators, farmers are able to plant their crops using low-tillage or no-tillage methods - using even less fuel, and causing far less sub-soil compaction than using conventional tillage.

RoundUp Ready Seeds have cut many farmers' cost of production by 30%-40%.
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Old 06-04-2012, 08:43 PM
 
833 posts, read 1,470,817 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
Let me start with RoundUp Ready Seeds - which have been on the market for over a quarter-century. Here are some of the benefits:
1. Farmers use less herbicides than ever before.
2. Because RoundUp is a contact herbicide, it does not go into the soil (like pre-emergent herbicides do), and subsequently leach down into the water table.
3. Farmers do not need to cultivate their fields - which keeps moisture in because the soil is not disturbed, minimizes erosion, and allows them to use roughly 1/3rd the amount of fuel previously used to produce crops (think air pollution here).
4. Because they don't need to cultivate their crops, and risk having last year's crop residue clog cultivators, farmers are able to plant their crops using low-tillage or no-tillage methods - using even less fuel, and causing far less sub-soil compaction than using conventional tillage.

RoundUp Ready Seeds have cut many farmers' cost of production by 30%-40%.
Nice to see a post full of facts instead of posts with wild rumors based on emotions.
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Old 06-05-2012, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,632,619 times
Reputation: 3359
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
Let me start with RoundUp Ready Seeds - which have been on the market for over a quarter-century. Here are some of the benefits:
1. Farmers use less herbicides than ever before.
2. Because RoundUp is a contact herbicide, it does not go into the soil (like pre-emergent herbicides do), and subsequently leach down into the water table.
3. Farmers do not need to cultivate their fields - which keeps moisture in because the soil is not disturbed, minimizes erosion, and allows them to use roughly 1/3rd the amount of fuel previously used to produce crops (think air pollution here).
4. Because they don't need to cultivate their crops, and risk having last year's crop residue clog cultivators, farmers are able to plant their crops using low-tillage or no-tillage methods - using even less fuel, and causing far less sub-soil compaction than using conventional tillage.

RoundUp Ready Seeds have cut many farmers' cost of production by 30%-40%.
1 & 2, which allow for 3 & 4, are temporary benefits. When the weeds become resistant to glyphosate (RoundUp), you're right back where you started using herbicide cocktails and battling tenacious weeds... and looking for the next temporary cure-all because 3 & 4 are now worse than they were before.

So, you have synthetically gene-modified crops designed to resist an herbicide (often developed by the same company), and weeds that become resistant to that herbicide naturally. So the companies splice in a few more genes into the seed, tweak their herbicide recipe, release V2 as "new and improved" and in a few years the weeds become resistant to that... and so on, and so on.
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