U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: When Recycling Peantut butter, ketchup and other jars...
You don't bother, just put them in with the other trash? 12 25.53%
Just recycle them without cleaning them out? 9 19.15%
Fill with water, let sit then place in recycle bin? 0 0%
Fill with water, put lid on, shake until no food left then recycle? 24 51.06%
Run them thru the dshwasher so they are clean and sterile before recycling? 2 4.26%
Voters: 47. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-21-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,179 posts, read 9,394,785 times
Reputation: 9552

Advertisements

LOL We have some 'recycle' bins in town, where separating the recyclables is voluntary.

However, we 'recycle' so much here at the farm that we rarely use the bins. Clear mayo and peanut butter jars are washed in the dishwasher and used in the shop to hold different sizes of nuts, bolts, and other small items so we can see what is in each one. Mustard and ketchup containers (we buy in bulk so have the large ones) that are opaque are washed in the dishwasher and used and labeled to hold other things. The big plastic containers that hold our coffee are used as not only feed scoops in the bags/bins and fertilizer scoops (they have the nice molded handles) but as containers for everything from curry brushes through eggs and produce from the garden to fly rub. (Not at the same time!)

We shred newspaper and mail circulars, and cut up boxes and paper bags and use them as fire starters in the woodstove in the winter, as well as on the charcoal grill in the summer. I've even lined boxes with tinfoil or waxed paper and used them to either transport baked goods to events or other peoples' homes, or as soap and plaster molds.

A friend who owns a restaurant bought 10 cases of Ball canning jars that had salsa in them. The salsa was expired, and she wanted to discard them. We took them all; emptied the jars, washed them in the dishwasher, and bought new lids. Voila! 120 pint canning jars for the price of some lids!

Why buy things at the store, or fill recycle bins, when you can reuse and recycle?

Last edited by SCGranny; 07-21-2012 at 09:01 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-21-2012, 09:02 AM
Status: "Harlan Ogilvy was right!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
21,282 posts, read 21,798,716 times
Reputation: 33383
I scrape all that stuff out of mustard, ketchup, mayo, barbecue, tartar sauces, etc into a single Ball jar, stick a cute folksy label on it and sell it at flea markets as "Ghengis' Speshul Sawsz". Coming soon to a natural foods store near you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2012, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,179 posts, read 9,394,785 times
Reputation: 9552
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
I scrape all that stuff out of mustard, ketchup, mayo, barbecue, tartar sauces, etc into a single Ball jar, stick a cute folksy label on it and sell it at flea markets as "Ghengis' Speshul Sawsz". Coming soon to a natural foods store near you.


"There's one born every minute - and two to take advantage of him."

You need to trademark it before someone on here steals your 'recipe'.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2012, 10:51 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,842 posts, read 41,948,655 times
Reputation: 43218
Quote:
Originally Posted by TechGromit View Post
Actually I don't why they even bother to recycle glass anymore. It's too heavy to transport it very far. Very few companies want to pay for the expense of moving recycled glass, they just have new bottles made. And lets face it, glass isn't exactly a toxic product to the environment.

Plastic on the other hand is far more valuable.

Glass is one of the easiest materials to recycle. Mix cullet into the batch and you can drop furnace temps by 15% or so. You do have to keep the colors separate. One of the issues now is that much of our glass making has been off shored.

Plastic, on the other hand, is a pain. Not only due to types but also color. Look at the bottom of various plastic containers, some such as those for oil (all types including cooking) and anti-freeze can't be recycled. The oily film left is almost impossible to remove and the added input needed to prepare it isn't worth the effort for the manufacturer.

I worked in both the plastic and the glass industry for the same company.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2012, 04:54 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,842 posts, read 41,948,655 times
Reputation: 43218
One other use for glass is in asphalt for parking lots. I don't remember the mix ratios but glass has been added for at least 15 years. It's ground really fine but you can still see it. It doesn't matter what the color is so mingled cullet can be used.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2012, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 8,616,638 times
Reputation: 3358
We don't have recycling here in the bush, so I have to take our recycling into Fairbanks whenever I make the trek in for supplies. Mostly this is aluminum soda cans (salvage $) and food cans (no salvage $); but sometimes there are a few awkward shapes/sizes of plastic & glass I can't repurpose at home. Cardboard often gets reused, until it dies and then I burn it or compost it; same with paper, it's either fire start in the wood stove or shred and stuck in the compost. When I scrape food containers to get the last bits out, it goes into our "compost" trash bin (except peanut butter, our dog gets that if it's not moldy )
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-05-2012, 04:30 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,150 posts, read 70,049,185 times
Reputation: 75968
Why let them sit with water in them? Why not just wash them out with soap and water, and a kitchen scrub brush? It only takes a few seconds. The important thing is to soak the exterior so you can remove the label, or run the label under hot water so it can be removed easily and thoroughly. The jars can't be recycled with the labels still on them. The recycle trucks only take them to the town dump if the labels aren't removed. Maybe it depends on what kind of recycle facility each city has, but most require removal of the labels.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2012, 07:53 PM
 
3,647 posts, read 4,748,176 times
Reputation: 5786
Love SouthCarolinaGranny's approach. I use it too, although on a much smaller scale. My family always washed and saved jars and I do also. Some of the make pretty containers for dried mixes, little cookies, etc. at Christmas.

I can just see the vegetable soup sitting in a large Maxwell House instant coffee jar in the refrigerator when I was little. I have some jars in my refrigerator right now with leftovers.

Here's a cute story to end on. My father always cut up the onions and celery for the Thanksgiving dressing the night before. How did he measure? Filling up quart Maxwell House instant coffee jars.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-11-2012, 08:51 PM
 
2,737 posts, read 4,323,886 times
Reputation: 1785
Our city doesn't allow glass in the recycling, and I'm not willing to burn the gas necessary to take it to a recycling plant. So the obvious happens...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-12-2012, 09:23 AM
 
Location: East Coast
2,898 posts, read 4,569,893 times
Reputation: 4280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big George View Post
Our city doesn't allow glass in the recycling, and I'm not willing to burn the gas necessary to take it to a recycling plant. So the obvious happens...
I'm so sorry to hear this about your city. Would it be worth it to set up a "glass-pool" to the recycling plant with a couple of neighbors?

Quote:
Glass is one of the few materials that can be recycled infinitely without losing strength, purity or quality.
Glass Recycling - Earth911.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:40 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top