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Old 07-01-2013, 08:07 PM
 
Location: From the Middle East of the USA
641 posts, read 567,875 times
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Is it due to the process at the powerplants? Or is it the makeup of coal? IDK...
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Old 07-01-2013, 08:34 PM
 
10,365 posts, read 8,336,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hickoryfan View Post
Is it due to the process at the powerplants? Or is it the makeup of coal? IDK...
Check out mountaintop removal coal mining. Your question will be more than amply answered.
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Old 07-02-2013, 12:08 AM
 
15,924 posts, read 17,360,144 times
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Originally Posted by hickoryfan View Post
Is it due to the process at the powerplants? Or is it the makeup of coal? IDK...
Let me Bing that for you!
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Old 07-02-2013, 06:43 AM
 
Location: DC
6,498 posts, read 6,414,062 times
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This can't be a legitimate question.
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Old 07-02-2013, 11:17 AM
 
6,059 posts, read 6,275,254 times
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Believe me, when I say I know nothing of this topic. But arent fossil fuels a type of bio fuel also? Just one that has been left under lots of pressure, and heat naturally, and allowed to go through various chemical reactions by nature when a substance is allowed to stay underground for millions or billions of year.
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Old 07-02-2013, 11:21 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,410 posts, read 28,297,749 times
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Coal is fine if it is mined with safe procedures and it is fine to burn to generate electricity if the plant is equipped with air quality controls.

Sometimes neither condition is met and those dirty facilities ruin the reputation of everyone.
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Old 07-02-2013, 11:43 AM
 
2,478 posts, read 4,844,482 times
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Originally Posted by DCforever View Post
This can't be a legitimate question.
I was thinking the same thing.

coal power: air pollution | Union of Concerned Scientists


Sulfur dioxide (SO2): Coal plants are the United States’ leading source of SO2 pollution, which takes a major toll on public health, including by contributing to the formation of small acidic particulates that can penetrate into human lungs and be absorbed by the bloodstream. SO2 also causes acid rain, which damages crops, forests, and soils, and acidifies lakes and streams. A typical uncontrolled coal plant emits 14,100 tons of SO2 per year. A typical coal plant with emissions controls, including flue gas desulfurization (smokestack scrubbers), emits 7,000 tons of SO2 per year.

Nitrogen oxides (NOx): NOx pollution causes ground level ozone, or smog, which can burn lung tissue, exacerbate asthma, and make people more susceptible to chronic respiratory diseases. A typical uncontrolled coal plant emits 10,300 tons of NOx per year. A typical coal plant with emissions controls, including selective catalytic reduction technology, emits 3,300 tons of NOx per year.


Particulate matter: Particulate matter (also referred to as soot or fly ash) can cause chronic bronchitis, aggravated asthma, and premature death, as well as haze obstructing visibility. A typical uncontrolled plan emits 500 tons of small airborne particles each year. Baghouses installed inside coal plant smokestacks can capture as much as 99 percent of the particulates.


Mercury: Coal plants are responsible for more than half of the U.S. human-caused emissions of mercury, a toxic heavy metal that causes brain damage and heart problems. Just 1/70th of a teaspoon of mercury deposited on a 25-acre lake can make the fish unsafe to eat. A typical uncontrolled coal plants emits approximately 170 pounds of mercury each year. Activated carbon injection technology can reduce mercury emissions by up to 90 percent when combined with baghouses. ACI technology is currently found on just 8 percent of the U.S. coal fleet.


Other harmful pollutants emitted annually from a typical, uncontrolled coal plant include approximately:
114 pounds of lead, 4 pounds of cadmium, other toxic heavy metals, and trace amounts of uranium. Baghouses can reduce heavy metal emissions by up to 90 percent3.


720 tons of carbon monoxide, which causes headaches and places additional stress on people with heart disease.


220 tons of hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds (VOC), which form ozone.


225 pounds of arsenic, which will cause cancer in one out of 100 people who drink water containing 50 parts per billion.
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Old 07-02-2013, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Surfside Beach, SC
2,135 posts, read 2,624,754 times
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Default Love it!

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Originally Posted by plwhit View Post
This is wonderful!
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Old 07-02-2013, 04:19 PM
 
39,138 posts, read 40,498,326 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ankhharu View Post
I was thinking the same thing.

coal power: air pollution | Union of Concerned Scientists


Sulfur dioxide (SO2): Coal plants are the United States’ leading source of SO2 pollution, which takes a major toll on public health, including by contributing to the formation of small acidic particulates that can penetrate into human lungs and be absorbed by the bloodstream. SO2 also causes acid rain, which damages crops, forests, and soils, and acidifies lakes and streams. A typical uncontrolled coal plant emits 14,100 tons of SO2 per year. A typical coal plant with emissions controls, including flue gas desulfurization (smokestack scrubbers), emits 7,000 tons of SO2 per year.

Nitrogen oxides (NOx): NOx pollution causes ground level ozone, or smog, which can burn lung tissue, exacerbate asthma, and make people more susceptible to chronic respiratory diseases. A typical uncontrolled coal plant emits 10,300 tons of NOx per year. A typical coal plant with emissions controls, including selective catalytic reduction technology, emits 3,300 tons of NOx per year.


Particulate matter: Particulate matter (also referred to as soot or fly ash) can cause chronic bronchitis, aggravated asthma, and premature death, as well as haze obstructing visibility. A typical uncontrolled plan emits 500 tons of small airborne particles each year. Baghouses installed inside coal plant smokestacks can capture as much as 99 percent of the particulates.
Note this is across the board and not just the coal industry:

Air Quality Trends | AirTrends | Air & Radiation | EPA



1980 vs. 2010
Carbon Monoxide (CO) -71%
Lead (Pb) -97%
Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) -52%
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) -63%
Direct PM10 -83%
Direct PM2.5 -55%
Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) -69


Quote:
Mercury: Coal plants are responsible for more than half of the U.S. human-caused emissions of mercury, a toxic heavy metal that causes brain damage and heart problems. Just 1/70th of a teaspoon of mercury deposited on a 25-acre lake can make the fish unsafe to eat. A typical uncontrolled coal plants emits approximately 170 pounds of mercury each year. Activated carbon injection technology can reduce mercury emissions by up to 90 percent when combined with baghouses. ACI technology is currently found on just 8 percent of the U.S. coal fleet.
Mercury is global issue and US coal plants account for 1% of the global pool. EPA studies suggest US coal plants are responsible for "very little of the mercury in US waters". Even if we were to eliminate all mercury emissions it would have a negligible effect globally or here in the US.

The new mercury regulations will decrease deposition rates here in the US 1% to 10% and increase the average IQ and estimated 2/1000 of one point.


Quote:
Fact Sheet - Final Rule | Clean Air Mercury Rule | US EPA

EPA has conducted extensive analyses on mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants and subsequent regional patterns of deposition to U.S. waters. Those analyses conclude that regional transport of mercury emission from coal-fired power plants in the U.S. is responsible for very little of the mercury in U.S. waters. That small contribution will be significantly reduced after EPA’s Clean Air Interstate Rule and Clean Air Mercury Rule are implemented.

U.S. coal-fired power plants emit mercury in three different forms: oxidized mercury (likely to deposit within the U.S.); elemental mercury, which travels hundreds and thousands of miles before depositing to land and water; and mercury that is in particulate form.

Because mercury can be transported thousands of miles in the atmosphere, and because many types of fish are caught and sold globally, effective exposure reduction will require reductions in global emissions.
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Old 07-02-2013, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,387 posts, read 17,283,525 times
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Nothing burned is "green".

Coal burned in a modern generating plant is about as clean as anything. The pictures of coal generating plants that folks have in their heads are of smoke stacks from 50-100 years ago. They're not like that any longer, but of course they still emit CO-2, as does anything that burns, breathes, rots or rusts, and a few years ago the Supreme Court decided the EPA could consider any CO-2 emissions as pollution. Don't be too surprised if one of these days you need an EPA permit to take a dump, or worse, to exhale.

I used to consider myself an environmentalist. I haven't changed my views on nature and polluting, but I'd never call myself an environmentalist today. They've gone way overboard in attempts to stifle industry of any kind other than their own. Even if their cause makes no sense, the goal is to slow down progress by tying it up in the courts by any means possible. Today I'd be ashamed to be linked with the Sierra Club, Greenpeace or any other environmental groups. It's a shame, because I'm all for preserving the planet, but they all go too far. Even the "local" groups that have reasonable goals in the beginning get sucked in with the wackos after time.
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