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Old 04-06-2014, 08:30 PM
MJ7 MJ7 started this thread
 
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Europe's Clothes Dryers Consume Half As Much Energy As America's - Forbes

I believe the first round of this heat pump dryer technology is finally going to be making it's way to the US soon. It would be a great way to save energy, because the second largest consumer of the average household is the dryer, right after the refrigerator.
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Old 04-06-2014, 09:03 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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I do not think I am going to be interested in a clothes dryer that takes twice as long to dry one load.
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Old 04-06-2014, 11:43 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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Heat pumps don't work in the north so it's not going to do us much good.

Anyway, you can just dry clothes on the line or use racks. NO electricity at all.

I only do laundry for two people but if you have kids, it could be too much to do line drying. In that case I'd use the line for some things and use the dryer too. But by air drying the laundry you're saving a lot of electricity.
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Old 04-06-2014, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Apparently they do not work like heat pump HVAC systems:

LG Dryers Feature Heat Pumps, NFC, and Trick Doors at CES - Reviewed.com Laundry

"Most dryers generate heat using electricity or gas, and then vent that hot air out into the environment, wasting a lot of energy. A heat pump dryer recaptures that hot air, removes the moisture from it, and then pumps it back into the drum to dry more clothes."

The outside air temp has nothing to do with it.
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Old 04-07-2014, 12:35 AM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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Clothes dryer - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article says there are lots of different kinds of dryers that we don't have. It says the heat pump dryer won't work at temps lower than 5C/41F. Meaning indoor or outdoor temps? Not too many people have 41F indoor temperature if that's what they mean.

I still go for the indoor rack type of drying. Not low tech, NO tech. It's good because in the north the indoor air is so dry in winter but if you have damp clothes hanging around, you get some moisture into the air. Same reason I open the dishwasher door before it goes into the drying cycle--we get the benefit of that welcome moisture and the dishes dry with no electricity.
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Old 04-07-2014, 01:26 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
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Odd, I wrote a post that disappeared.

41 degrees would not be unusual if the dryer were located in an area with no heat or A/C, like an unfinished basement.

I remember my mother using a clothesline outdoors and indoor racks in bad weather. Here in the South, if you got a rainy stretch in the summer and you did not have air conditioning, laundry could take forever to dry indoors and might get a sour smell before it did so. Mom was so happy to finally get a dryer. The best part was how much softer towels were compared to those dried on a line.

To me, laundry takes forever as it is. There is just no way to hurry it up. I doubt a dryer that takes longer would save enough to make me want to buy one.
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Old 04-07-2014, 06:48 AM
Zot
 
Location: 3rd rock from a nearby star
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
Europe's Clothes Dryers Consume Half As Much Energy As America's - Forbes

I believe the first round of this heat pump dryer technology is finally going to be making it's way to the US soon. It would be a great way to save energy, because the second largest consumer of the average household is the dryer, right after the refrigerator.
My cloths dryers consume virtually no electricity, they use propane to dry. Gas dryers run hotter and dry quicker than electric. The cost of running a gas line to a dryer varies but can be anywhere from $300 to $800 and requires a licensed plumber plus a building inspection in my area.

You'd also need to consider that dryer sizes in Europe are smaller than in the U.S. and also often combine washing with drying.

In my home American, it seems as if we stuff a few hundred pounds of stuff in (or as much as will fit, whichever comes first) and press start, stand back and stare in amazement when the thing starts to shake, hoping it won't explode.

A heat pump would likely add cold area to a room, which could be a problem in winter. I have a Geospring heat pump assisted hot water heater, which seems to help with the electric bill, but the room where it is stored is both cool and dry year round. It required a separate drain for the heat pump condensate (it isn't legal to put condensate into our sewer or septic where I live). I also heat and cool my home via heat pump. As such, I'm a fan. Though I'm not certain it's a great idea for dryers (it may be too slow to dry).
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Old 04-07-2014, 06:51 AM
Zot
 
Location: 3rd rock from a nearby star
468 posts, read 579,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Heat pumps don't work in the north so it's not going to do us much good.

Anyway, you can just dry clothes on the line or use racks. NO electricity at all.

I only do laundry for two people but if you have kids, it could be too much to do line drying. In that case I'd use the line for some things and use the dryer too. But by air drying the laundry you're saving a lot of electricity.
Some counties or towns do not permit cloths lines. In my city, only older homes are grandfathered for cloths lines, newer homes may not install them.

As to heat pumps and the north, I'm in the Northeast and my home is heated and cooled by heat pumps. So far it's worked. The rule of thumb years ago was no further north than Virginia or Maryland for heat pumps in winter, but over the past two years, I went from oil heat and hot water to heat pump (for heat and heat pump assist for hot water via a Geospring).
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Old 04-07-2014, 06:52 AM
 
Location: Idaho
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I bet author of that article wouldn't gladly take the longer drying time trade-off in a laundromat.
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Old 04-07-2014, 08:45 AM
 
Location: NE Mississippi
13,433 posts, read 8,456,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
Europe's Clothes Dryers Consume Half As Much Energy As America's - Forbes

I believe the first round of this heat pump dryer technology is finally going to be making it's way to the US soon. It would be a great way to save energy, because the second largest consumer of the average household is the dryer, right after the refrigerator.
They cost $1500! The dryer I have now has been paid for since 1990.

And whoever said they are "the second largest consumer...." did not live in an air conditioned house and did not have an electric hot water heater, and as far as I can see, never figured out how long it would take to get his 1500 bucks back.
This stuff gets crazy....
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