U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-29-2014, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Sector 001
7,233 posts, read 6,411,742 times
Reputation: 8271

Advertisements

I do not use vinegar. I use hydrogen peroxide and bleach mostly. Baking soda/borax and brillo pads for the bathtub. Why? Because they are cheap, they work, and most other products are based around them. Also use ammonia/glass cleaner. (but not with bleach)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-29-2014, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,307 posts, read 59,530,406 times
Reputation: 53791
Quote:
Originally Posted by stockwiz View Post
I do not use vinegar. I use hydrogen peroxide and bleach mostly.
Bleach is toxic and corrosive. Vinegar is not toxic, and is nowhere near as corrosive (because every acid is corrosive).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2014, 10:05 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,943 posts, read 32,635,136 times
Reputation: 27431
I use vinegar to clean most things in my house, it works like a charm. I mix 1 part white vinegar to 2 parts water in a spray bottle and it nukes most everything. I also use magic erasers to get stubborn stains off my counters. All you need for that is water. For a REALLY stubborn stain I'll spray the vinegar/water mix on it to get it really saturated, then put a cloth over it and leave it for an hour or so, then hit it with the magic eraser. Comes right off.

I make exceptions for my hardwood floors and antique tile. If I notice a buildup on my hardwoods I will clean them with diluted vinegar on my hands and knees, though I do this maybe twice a year. The rest of the time I use wood soap or just a slightly damp mop with warm water. My house was built in 1957 and the master bath is still all original and has never been re-grouted. The grout lines do get grubby, so I scrub it on my hands and knees with a grout brush. For really stubborn stains, I use a bleach pen and then rinse with water. The tile on the floor is old and worn and some of it will never regain its former luster, but I can at least keep it in good condition for as long as possible. Bathroom remodels are expensive.

You CAN clean some tile and grout with white vinegar, but be aware that the acidity of the vinegar will etch surfaces that have a lot of alkaline in them. Google first if you're unsure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2014, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,453,015 times
Reputation: 16765
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
I use vinegar to clean most things in my house, it works like a charm. I mix 1 part white vinegar to 2 parts water in a spray bottle and it nukes most everything. I also use magic erasers to get stubborn stains off my counters. All you need for that is water. For a REALLY stubborn stain I'll spray the vinegar/water mix on it to get it really saturated, then put a cloth over it and leave it for an hour or so, then hit it with the magic eraser. Comes right off.

I make exceptions for my hardwood floors and antique tile. If I notice a buildup on my hardwoods I will clean them with diluted vinegar on my hands and knees, though I do this maybe twice a year. The rest of the time I use wood soap or just a slightly damp mop with warm water. My house was built in 1957 and the master bath is still all original and has never been re-grouted. The grout lines do get grubby, so I scrub it on my hands and knees with a grout brush. For really stubborn stains, I use a bleach pen and then rinse with water. The tile on the floor is old and worn and some of it will never regain its former luster, but I can at least keep it in good condition for as long as possible. Bathroom remodels are expensive.

You CAN clean some tile and grout with white vinegar, but be aware that the acidity of the vinegar will etch surfaces that have a lot of alkaline in them. Google first if you're unsure.
We had tile in the kitchen on the counters, and mom used toothpaste to clean the grout. It seemed to work well too, and didn't damage it. Everything thinks I'm nuts but I want the plasticize stuff stuck down replaced by tile. I will clean out grout over trying to clean pitted plastic from looking like dirt city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-31-2014, 11:22 PM
 
Location: North Texas
23,943 posts, read 32,635,136 times
Reputation: 27431
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
We had tile in the kitchen on the counters, and mom used toothpaste to clean the grout. It seemed to work well too, and didn't damage it. Everything thinks I'm nuts but I want the plasticize stuff stuck down replaced by tile. I will clean out grout over trying to clean pitted plastic from looking like dirt city.
I hear you; I hate vinyl. Once it pits, you have to scrub it on your hands and knees to de-grubbify it. It's ugly too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2014, 11:17 PM
 
28 posts, read 56,796 times
Reputation: 57
I use vinegar because it's GREEN. Lysol, bleach, comet, etc. are not. They contribute to polluting the water and your bodies. You can lick a counter after cleaning with vinegar because it is food. Not saying it tastes good (though it does have health benefits for some people), but it won't make you sick as the other cleansers might. Not suggesting I lick my counters, either. You might think the other cleansers smell better, but all smells are actually particles. When you whiff bleach or lysol-type products, you are embedding chemicals in your lungs. We already get enough of this just from breathing the air in our polluted cities. I'm astounded at some of the posts on here and don't understand why people who are into "green" would be whining about the smell of something natural that dissipates, over something that pollutes and makes your home toxic--even if it smells "pretty."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2014, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 23,516,131 times
Reputation: 10573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddler2 View Post
I use vinegar because it's GREEN. Lysol, bleach, comet, etc. are not. They contribute to polluting the water and your bodies.
I disagree, particularly in regards to good old chlorine bleach. It's a powerful disinfectant, even in very diluted strengths (I use 1 tablespoon of bleach to a gallon of water for general all around use). It's so reactive that it completely breaks down over a short time in water, and it is so safe when diluted it is used to treat drinking water in smaller communities which can't afford chlorine gas equipment.

Yes, vinegar is milder, but it also is not as effective a disinfectant, especially against some of the really nasty viruses and infectious bacteria floating around today, which is why brewers, butchers, and hospitals all use bleach rather than vinegar.

Quote:
When you whiff bleach or lysol-type products, you are embedding chemicals in your lungs.
When you whiff vinegar, you are doing the same thing, just with a different chemical... acetic acid... which also dissolves and passes through your system just like other water soluble substances do. This is in no way like the way non-soluble particulate matter such carbon particles can embed in lung tissue.

Quote:
We already get enough of this just from breathing the air in our polluted cities. I'm astounded at some of the posts on here and don't understand why people who are into "green" would be whining about the smell of something natural that dissipates, over something that pollutes and makes your home toxic--even if it smells "pretty."
Sorry, but your knowledge of science is flawed.

I'm not opposed to people using vinegar if they want to, be my guest, I just hate to see overblown claims and misinformation posted in connection with its use.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2014, 12:02 PM
 
28 posts, read 56,796 times
Reputation: 57
Thanks for responding. I've answered you in blue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by OpenD View Post
I disagree, particularly in regards to good old chlorine bleach. It's a powerful disinfectant, even in very diluted strengths (I use 1 tablespoon of bleach to a gallon of water for general all around use). It's so reactive that it completely breaks down over a short time in water, and it is so safe when diluted it is used to treat drinking water in smaller communities which can't afford chlorine gas equipment.

I also have set aside chlorine bleach as a backup water purifier (a few drops) as well as iodine. The correct chemical for the correct task. But for general cleaning (counters, etc) it's safer for pets and children, as well as your breathing, to use vinegar. And if you're trying to live green, you'll limit toxic chemicals to occasional but necessary use.

Yes, vinegar is milder, but it also is not as effective a disinfectant, especially against some of the really nasty viruses and infectious bacteria floating around today, which is why brewers, butchers, and hospitals all use bleach rather than vinegar.

My mistake. I thought we were talking about what to use in your simple GREEN home. Hospitals, etc. do require stronger chemicals as the types of bacteria and germs floating around could be contagious and they need to be killed with assurance. However, I do know that many cleaning products have now been made that are green, i.e., not harmful to the environment, and are used in motels/hotels for patrons who have allergies to chemicals. Many people nowadays have developed these allergies to chemicals from being over-exposed to them



When you whiff vinegar, you are doing the same thing, just with a different chemical... acetic acid... which also dissolves and passes through your system just like other water soluble substances do. This is in no way like the way non-soluble particulate matter such carbon particles can embed in lung tissue.

Yes, but I'd rather inhale vinegar (a food smell) than a toxic chemical disguised as perfume.



Sorry, but your knowledge of science is flawed.

I'm not opposed to people using vinegar if they want to, be my guest, I just hate to see overblown claims and misinformation posted in connection with its use.
Oh? You're sorry? Glad to see you're apologizing for the ad hominem, considering you know nothing about me or my range of knowledge. I made no overblown claims, so I assume you're referring to others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-23-2014, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 23,516,131 times
Reputation: 10573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddler2 View Post
Thanks for responding. I've answered you in blue.

I also have set aside chlorine bleach as a backup water purifier (a few drops) as well as iodine. The correct chemical for the correct task. But for general cleaning (counters, etc) it's safer for pets and children, as well as your breathing, to use vinegar. And if you're trying to live green, you'll limit toxic chemicals to occasional but necessary use.
Ah, but pure Acetic Acid, the key ingredient in vinegar, is very corrosive and is every bit as toxic as bleach is. It can burn right through your skin. The main reason bottled vinegar is relatively safe by comparison is that it's already so heavily diluted in water, only 5% in "pickling vinegar" strength.

Quote:
Quote:
OpenD said: Yes, vinegar is milder, but it also is not as effective a disinfectant, especially against some of the really nasty viruses and infectious bacteria floating around today, which is why brewers, butchers, and hospitals all use bleach rather than vinegar.
My mistake. I thought we were talking about what to use in your simple GREEN home. Hospitals, etc. do require stronger chemicals as the types of bacteria and germs floating around could be contagious and they need to be killed with assurance.
I AM talking about home use, where proper disinfection is more important today than ever before, with so much higher likelihood of carrying serious disease organisms into your home in your bag of groceries. And numerous studies have shown that the most infected surfaces in the average home are in the kitchen, with the sink being the typical hotspot. And a number of nasty viruses can survive on hard surfaces for up to 2 weeks.

At a similar 5% strength, bleach is 3X as effective as vinegar is at killing polio viruses, and hepatitis and meningitis, as well as the more common grocery contaminants such as e. coli and salmonella and campylobacter. You know, the ones that keep killing lots of people due to contaminated food.

Quote:
However, I do know that many cleaning products have now been made that are green, i.e., not harmful to the environment, and are used in motels/hotels for patrons who have allergies to chemicals. Many people nowadays have developed these allergies to chemicals from being over-exposed to them
There are people with vinegar allergies, which is completely understandable when you consider how many chemicals are in it. Studies have shown that in addition to acetic acid, vinegar contains gallic acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, catechin, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, syringaldehyde, p-coumaric acid, m-coumaric acid, anisaldehyde, epicatechin, sinapic acid, salicylaldehyde, scopoletin, veratraldehyde and o-coumaric acid. Ohmigard, so many chemicals!

Anyway, the point of my comments is simple... properly diluted, chlorine bleach is every bit as green as vinegar is, and it is more effective as a disinfectant. Vinegar is a better window cleaner, to be sure, because of its mild solvent action, but bleach is better at killing the little critters that can kill us, so don't be afraid to use it as appropriately.

Quote:
Quote:
I'm not opposed to people using vinegar if they want to, be my guest, I just hate to see overblown claims and misinformation posted in connection with its use.
Oh? You're sorry? Glad to see you're apologizing for the ad hominem, considering you know nothing about me or my range of knowledge. I made no overblown claims, so I assume you're referring to others.
No, it wasn't an ad hominem. I wasn't attacking you, not at all, just attempting to correct the misinformation you posted.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-23-2014, 06:18 PM
 
3,431 posts, read 3,013,920 times
Reputation: 4125
Some great uses for vinegar:
1) Removing glue (including labels on bottles) when it's been heated *use a sponge
2) Soaking new clothes before washing, if the dye in the clothes is likely to run (like jeans... add vinegar to a basin of water and soak the clothing overnight before washing)
3) Catching fruitflies... use cider vinegar in a small cup with a dollop or two of liquid dish soap added. The fruitflies are drawn by the smell of the cider vinegar, and the dish soap kills 'em
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top