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Old 02-06-2015, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,465,981 times
Reputation: 10927

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
It's not the case where he lives, either. He lives in Tennessee, but he's a Michigan transplant so he's confused.

Comes down here, railing about big government but, deep down, he's a regulations guy.

No I don't support the regulation. I was simply stating the fact that it exists. I support the right for people to do this, but code law is highly entrenched and difficult to change. People who believe in the tiny house movement need to get the laws changed. I know someone who is trying to do this (build a tiny house), and trying to figure out how to get around the laws. From what I have read this is a problem nationwide for people who are to build these small homes, whether your in TN, MI or anywhere else. Most locals have a minimum square footage for a building, that is what the catch is. Some folks have put them on trailers and tried to get them listed as a "mobile home" but that is dicey at best. Like I said all it takes is for one nosy neighbor to turn you in and its all over. Personally I would not put one penny into something like this until the code law was fixed, too much risk for me. That does not mean I have any problem with it, on the contrary its an interesting idea for single people or young childless couples who might be able to make it work. Oh and I am no regulations guy, your wrong about that.
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Old 02-07-2015, 10:23 PM
 
33,046 posts, read 22,062,610 times
Reputation: 8970
Quote:
Originally Posted by cab591 View Post
That RV experience sounds awesome!


RV Travel Ideas, News and Dealer Information | Go RVing
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Old 02-08-2015, 12:22 PM
 
7,281 posts, read 8,876,868 times
Reputation: 11419
Quote:
Originally Posted by freemkt View Post
Indeed, the RV experience does sound great. That is how the dealers manage to sell RVs. That is also why there are so many used RVs for sale, it sounds great until reality sets in.

Don't get me wrong, I did it and loved it. The thing is that it is a lifestyle that requires quite a bit of change. I know that there is always the talk that you can still have all the modern conveniences. That is true, if you are sitting in some RV park or have a plot of land to sit on that has everything in utilities that a house has.

You still need to dump the holding tanks, you still need fresh water, you need electricity and propane. You can go solar and pretty much do with utility electric but everything else you will need, the same as in a house. There is no getting around it.

Then you have maintenance and if you think maintenance on a house is something, wait until you maintain an RV. That first roof leak will be a disaster and you won't just be putting a pot under the drip and sleeping in the next room.

You can get bugs, just like a house and the raccoons start living in the engine or electrical bays and chewing the wires. It happens and the longer you live in one the higher the chances of it happening.

Then you get into some nice park and the neighbor turns out to be a druggie. Problem is, he isn't on the next lot he is abut 15 feet away, all day, all night.

So you got a plot of land, its great. Wait, you need water. Sure, you can run into town to fill your fresh water holding tank and dump your gray and black water but you have to do it and can't just say you'll go another week.

Then you're going to pay rent to someone for that space. You can travel all the time and boondock but that isn't all it's cracked up to be. Basically, your goals each day are to manage the resources it takes to live and I'm talking about basic resources like water, sewer, power and all that.

It can be a blast and the experience of a lifetime, everyone should try it but there is a lot of work involved and RVs have complex systems for electrics and so on. Going to a dealer to get something fixed is often a week long affair. Not always but most of the time. Then it isn't cheap either. You think the call for a repair in a house is expensive? Wait until you spend a week at a dealer trying to get some errant electrical problem fixed or find that the part they need to put in your rig isn't readily available.

RVs are wonderful things and done right, you can have a great time but it isn't something to do because it sounds good. You are buying a small house that travels and you aren't leaving all the things about a house behind, you are taking it with you.

When that black water holding tank release valve breaks ( it will eventually ) the experience will be life changing for you. You can prepare for things like that but it is always going to happen when it is most inconvenient.

RVing is a blast, try it. I say try not buy because unless you've gone out for a month or so, soaking a lot of money into it (and it isn't cheap) can be a costly mistake. If you do buy, buy used because the person who had it before you will have likely fixed all the things that need fixing. Warranties on new rigs are nice until you realize how many owners make trips to the factories to get things fixed because so many dealers are less than incompetent.
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Old 02-09-2015, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Under a bridge
2,423 posts, read 3,142,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lycos679 View Post
I don't think there is any way I could live in 186SQFT. That comes out smaller than a 14x14 room, but I would also need a kitchen, bathroom, and shower in there. No thanks.
I'm a big fan of the tiny home movement but I agree that 186 square feet would be too small even for me as I'm single with no kids. Let's get it up to 400 square feet.

I've seen some clever storage solutions on tiny homes and pocket doors help a lot. If you can live clutter free and live minimalistic you'll do great in a tiny home. You could sock away a lot of money/savings into your bank account. How about a tiny home off-grid? Sweet!

-Cheers.
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Old 02-10-2015, 03:00 AM
 
2,004 posts, read 1,204,809 times
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You'll make a lot more money with a regular house than you'll save with a tiny house. All the liabilities of a house with only the benefits of a closet.
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Old 02-10-2015, 09:45 AM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,838 posts, read 21,144,826 times
Reputation: 9419
I'm not looking for a tiny house but I am seriously considering buying a 2 br 1 ba house built in the 1920s this summer. Most of the ones listed now are between 800 and 950 sq feet. There are safe areas of my metro area where you can get ones in nice shape for $55k to $70k. It would be better than an apartment but still cheap on utilities and taxes. Main thing is we want it to be on one level since it's more convenient / safe w/o stairs and easier to heat / cool.
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:33 AM
 
242 posts, read 288,332 times
Reputation: 531
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I'm not looking for a tiny house but I am seriously considering buying a 2 br 1 ba house built in the 1920s this summer. Most of the ones listed now are between 800 and 950 sq feet. There are safe areas of my metro area where you can get ones in nice shape for $55k to $70k. It would be better than an apartment but still cheap on utilities and taxes. Main thing is we want it to be on one level since it's more convenient / safe w/o stairs and easier to heat / cool.

WOW....a voice of REASON.

Go for it, censusdata. MUCH better approach than a trailer playhouse on wheels you'll never be legally able to sell. A house is an investment. A "tiny house" is a waste of money.

best of luck.....
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Old 02-11-2015, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
2,202 posts, read 1,425,853 times
Reputation: 1363
My wife and I are fans of small homes but tiny homes although
ingeniously designed are TOO small subject to unsightly energy
demanding addons the need for out buildings and already the
beginnings of insane pricing for a shoe box. I recall a doctor in
my hometown who built a $100,000 home in 1961 including a
lake front property 1/2 acre. It was 2600 sq ft built with real brick,3 bedrooms two bath a huge kitchen, living room, family room, full basement, two car garage and a half court "indoor" basketball gym! So when these naive tiny home zealots lay out a plan for 750 sq ft and paying 60K you realize they need mental
tweeking lol!
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Old 02-11-2015, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,549,506 times
Reputation: 16771
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I'm not looking for a tiny house but I am seriously considering buying a 2 br 1 ba house built in the 1920s this summer. Most of the ones listed now are between 800 and 950 sq feet. There are safe areas of my metro area where you can get ones in nice shape for $55k to $70k. It would be better than an apartment but still cheap on utilities and taxes. Main thing is we want it to be on one level since it's more convenient / safe w/o stairs and easier to heat / cool.
Mine is 720 sf. It's shotgun style. I find it perfectly fine in size. It was built in 1930. The main thing is ask about the foundation, and make sure its sound. And take care with additions. Many of these houses were added onto without permits and its a headache you don't want, so have someone trustworth inspect.

I love my old house, and its neat that the neighbors family used to own it and had family who lived here.

Go for it, but make sure to have someone check it out for hidden surprises.
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Old 02-11-2015, 10:09 AM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,838 posts, read 21,144,826 times
Reputation: 9419
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
Mine is 720 sf. It's shotgun style. I find it perfectly fine in size. It was built in 1930. The main thing is ask about the foundation, and make sure its sound. And take care with additions. Many of these houses were added onto without permits and its a headache you don't want, so have someone trustworth inspect.

I love my old house, and its neat that the neighbors family used to own it and had family who lived here.

Go for it, but make sure to have someone check it out for hidden surprises.
I've always had a soft spot for shotgun houses, they're so different from anything else in style. Where I live has the largest number of old shotgun houses in the USA, New Orleans was #1 pre Katrina. Many of them are highly decorated too. But of the houses I'm keeping an eye on to buy starting in early May only a couple are shotgun houses. Most are what's I'd call a bungalow.

We almost bought a house last summer and we looked at quite a few. After a while you start to figure out the styles that most houses in the area fall into. Some from the 1920s had layouts that were just bizarre and it would take a lot of money to get it looking better. Also many 2 level homes that are older only have 1 bathroom on the 2nd floor. My brother in law has that situation. I know from experience 2 level homes can be terrible for heating and cooling and kids or clumsy adults can fall down stairs.

This is typical for what we're considering. Just over 900 sq feet and everything is on one level. It's not a "dream home" but it would sure beat an apartment. In that area you can buy a fixer upper for $30k so even a home for only $65k often has been significantly improved. A lot of home flippers over that make a living doing that.

http://www.homes.com/property/1211-i...-600034219363/
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