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Old 03-15-2015, 01:23 PM
 
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The idea of tiny houses are great. They are not cheap, most people don't have $30K or more, and I doubt you can get a loan for one. All the ones I've seen on TV are mobile. I've never seen one in a neighborhood.
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Old 03-16-2015, 10:33 PM
 
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I suppose it boils down to what you want to do with the limited resources you have- your time and money. For the baby boomer (my parents) generation, it seems that a house with a 2 car garage, 2.5 children a dog and a mortgage were the going themes. The millennials may feel different pressures - climate change, changing economic conditions, and different priorities about how they would like to spend their limited resources...time and money. As a millennial myself, I see this as a great option for those of us who would like to positively influence our future economic condition (not having to take on a 30-year mortgage), decreasing responsibilities of upkeep and maintenance of a home and encouraging other activities than sitting at home including being outside, gardening, doing things in the community or freeing up one's time for more study which is what I want to be doing anyway. For people of this mindset, I think the tiny house is a beautiful option...
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Old 03-17-2015, 01:26 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
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I'm a boomer, but I'd really like to see the trend go to *smaller* houses. Tiny houses are likely too small for some. But you don't need 300 sf for a family of three. The house I picked to move to is 720, and with a functional storage area would be perfect. Eventually I'll have something. All it needs to be is a room where the stuff you will need can go and you don't have to trip over it.

What I wonder with these very large houses is who cleans them? Do they end up shutting the door on some of the rooms? And all those vaulted ceilings... I wonder how well that works when its 25 degrees and the wind is blowing in cold air.

I don't see people generally going for tiny houses, but a LOT of people around today were raised in houses not much bigger than mine and with three kids. They wanted a nice yard over a huge house. They didn't feel their fifties house was 'tiny'. I think it would be good for everyone to start things further ahead than their fantasy world.

Of course with the quality of building today, most of those big 'mansions' won't be standing much more than thirty years. Mine was built in 1930 and is still quite strong.
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Old 03-17-2015, 05:48 AM
 
Location: Rutherfordton,NC
14,310 posts, read 9,061,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
I'm a boomer, but I'd really like to see the trend go to *smaller* houses. Tiny houses are likely too small for some. But you don't need 300 sf for a family of three. The house I picked to move to is 720, and with a functional storage area would be perfect. Eventually I'll have something. All it needs to be is a room where the stuff you will need can go and you don't have to trip over it.

What I wonder with these very large houses is who cleans them? Do they end up shutting the door on some of the rooms? And all those vaulted ceilings... I wonder how well that works when its 25 degrees and the wind is blowing in cold air.


I think most Americans are have still have that "bigger is better" in their head. As I stated before a good floor plan can make the difference in a tiny home. Our one bed one bath apt is I'm guessing 400 if that.
We make due fine thank you. From what I have seen families that want a tiny home don't have kids & if they do it's mostly just one. Now that is something that they will have to address once they get older.
Thinking that you NEED stuff is the problem. Less stuff less stress.
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Old 03-17-2015, 08:06 AM
 
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Time will tell if this "Tiny house" movement is a fad or a truly realistic approach.

To me, more often than not, there seems to be a disconnect present in the thinking of most folks looking at this option where the "house" is the only focus and the infrastructure needed (by law in most areas) to make it "livable"...whether it be building it "to code"...or installing water and sanitation and other utilities...the driveway....property taxes...monthly costs/etc. There's a "simplicity" placed upon these dwellings that overlooks much of the reality of home ownership and responsibility of home ownership....as if buying a trailer with a shed perched on top of it will set someone up for life...no payments..no responsibilities...no answering to anyone else/etc. A good example of this is are the folks who think covering the wheels on such a dwelling will somehow DESTROY all codes and leave the clueless Building Inspector without recourse... Seriously? If it were THAT easy every house in the land would have wheels installed on the side of it.

We're heading from 2200/2 car garage to 800 sq ft no garage...so I agree with nightbird47 and his thoughts on downsizing as a whole. Smaller IS better....but there's a cut off point there where it gets a bit ridiculous. MOST people have a lot of STUFF.... and just like a trailer park....the "tiny home" communities will likely be trash dumps like MOST mobile home parks are....simply because ALL of the STUFF folks own who THINK they are living "green" will be sat OUTSIDE their "tiny home" for everyone else to look at.

Save the Earth my azz... did single/doublewide trailers and the trailer parks they are parked in save the Earth? LOL
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Old 03-17-2015, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,547 posts, read 17,534,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reed067 View Post
I think most Americans are have still have that "bigger is better" in their head. As I stated before a good floor plan can make the difference in a tiny home. Our one bed one bath apt is I'm guessing 400 if that.
We make due fine thank you. From what I have seen families that want a tiny home don't have kids & if they do it's mostly just one. Now that is something that they will have to address once they get older.
Thinking that you NEED stuff is the problem. Less stuff less stress.
Too late to fix it but my post was supposed to say a small family doesn't need 3k square feet. My mobile home was 2k and it was neat having specialty rooms, especially a dedicated library, but not for the price a built home would be that size.

I think my apartment was about 300 sf, and at first it was okay. But the kitchen was tiny and the cupboard had more narrow shelves, and there was no place for windows with air circulation. The ac was a joke. And, of course it was an apartment.

For me, a room dedicated to storing things works since I have hobbies. Right now the yarn for the current large stitching is laid out in the living room and will remain there since moving it would mix it up. I don't use patterns, but design my own. And I crochet things and have a yarn supply. And a few other hobbies with stuff saved up. If there is nowhere to officially save it, it sits in the corner. And the cost or replacing the yarn or thread for a new project would make an inexpensive hobby an expensive one. So that its there when I feel a project coming on is a very destressing thought.

If you don't do hobbies and have stuff just to have then it can be. But everyone is different.
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Old 03-17-2015, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Rutherfordton,NC
14,310 posts, read 9,061,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post



For me, a room dedicated to storing things works since I have hobbies. Right now the yarn for the current large stitching is laid out in the living room and will remain there since moving it would mix it up. I don't use patterns, but design my own. And I crochet things and have a yarn supply. And a few other hobbies with stuff saved up. If there is nowhere to officially save it, it sits in the corner. And the cost or replacing the yarn or thread for a new project would make an inexpensive hobby an expensive one. So that its there when I feel a project coming on is a very destressing thought.

If you don't do hobbies and have stuff just to have then it can be. But everyone is different.

I have never living in anything bigger then say... 1,200 Sf. Most of what I have lived in are hotel rooms, campers, etc. So I would never miss having tons of space. I do wood burning & my wife is a herbalist she of course needs more room then I do. Most things we like to do we do outside. If the weather is nice that's where you find us for the most part. It does seem again from what I've seen & read people who live in these very tiny home are like us. They spend a lot of time outside gardening & such.
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Old 03-17-2015, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,672 posts, read 49,423,020 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rainbow Demon View Post
Time will tell if this "Tiny house" movement is a fad or a truly realistic approach.

To me, more often than not, there seems to be a disconnect present in the thinking of most folks looking at this option where the "house" is the only focus and the infrastructure needed (by law in most areas) to make it "livable"...whether it be building it "to code"...
Nobody said anything about building a structure that is not up to code.

Why would you think there should be any higher expenses?



Quote:
... or installing water and sanitation and other utilities...the driveway....property taxes...monthly costs/etc.
Lets add rainbow fees and cloud taxes too, might as well.

Every property has property tax. Nobody is saying that property taxes go away when you own property.

If you want a paved driveway, then put in a paved driveway. But that is off-topic.
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Old 03-17-2015, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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I see the Tiny House Movement much the same way I see fashion / design shows and concept cars.

The idea is to do something a bit extreme, to highlight an underlying concept. The crazy, futuristic car you see at the LA auto show may not roll off the assembly line, but you'll see parts of its design and concept show up in later model years.

Tiny Houses are the same way. Could I live in one? Sure. But I'm single, like small spaces, and don't own much. But the movement isn't to try and force everyone into under 400 sq ft -- it's instead to get people to re-evaluate just how much space they REALLY need. Sure, a wooden box on a trailer would cost 1/10th of what a full size house would, and would cut your utilities and energy usage way down. But most people aren't making that extreme of a jump. But if you get a family of 3 out of a 3,000 sq ft house, and into a 1,500 sq ft house, they'll see (assuming all other things equal) their heating and cooling costs go down, mortgage payments go down, property taxes go down... All without a hugely negligible loss (assuming a well-planned layout).

Tiny Living also showcases the market for smaller appliances, and more efficient devices. Instant hot water heaters, more efficient refrigerators, etc. As these products are brought to light, more and more people will buy them (even if they live in a full-sized house), which not only lowers the market value, but also encourages development in the field. Switching appliances to more energy efficient ones can have a significant impact, even in large houses.

A few radicals moving into boxes on wheels gets people talking about the space they really need, and how much they'll save if they were to downsize.

An average-sized family should have no problem living in 700 - 1,200 sq ft.
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Old 03-18-2015, 04:05 AM
 
Location: Rutherfordton,NC
14,310 posts, read 9,061,711 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cab591 View Post
I see the Tiny House Movement much the same way I see fashion / design shows and concept cars.



Tiny Houses are the same way. Could I live in one? Sure. But I'm single, like small spaces, and don't own much. But the movement isn't to try and force everyone into under 400 sq ft -- it's instead to get people to re-evaluate just how much space they REALLY need. Sure, a wooden box on a trailer would cost 1/10th of what a full size house would, and would cut your utilities and energy usage way down. But most people aren't making that extreme of a jump. But if you get a family of 3 out of a 3,000 sq ft house, and into a 1,500 sq ft house, they'll see (assuming all other things equal) their heating and cooling costs go down, mortgage payments go down, property taxes go down... All without a hugely negligible loss (assuming a well-planned layout).

I can see why some might consider it a fad & depending on where one lives then even more so.
Some are off the grid with these tiny homes & for the most part I see more & more doing this very thing. I believe that is another goal is to get people to live off the grid as well or at least show them the benefits of doing so. I don't see a family of three living in a 1,200sq ft house. More people equals more stuff.
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