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Old 02-23-2015, 01:59 PM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,914 posts, read 4,020,143 times
Reputation: 15538

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
It's only as safe as the bacteria levels in the milk.

I grew up on a farm, too, and drank raw milk. I didn't die from it, but then I didn't die from driving without a seat belt or rock climbing in Zoar Valley either. That doesn't mean it was the smartest thing to do.

We sold our milk to the co-op, and on rare occasions our milk wasn't accepted because the bacteria count was too high. Hopefully, you don't get your raw milk on high bacteria day.
That is true. If the farmers follow best practices and follow the cleaning/sanitizing protocols and vet their animals responsibly, that all helps.
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Old 02-23-2015, 02:00 PM
 
39,134 posts, read 40,480,062 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyFarm34 View Post

Its all about proper safety and storage of the milk.
Assuming you have a sterilized container the issue is getting it from the udder into the sterilized container without contamination. Even if you are taking every precaution people make mistakes....
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Old 02-23-2015, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Backwoods of Maine
7,092 posts, read 8,089,239 times
Reputation: 18693
It's all about personal choice.

There is ZERO chance that an innocent buyer will get raw milk. On the other hand, those who wish to drink milk in its unpasteurized state, have been treated as criminals. Even when several buyers get together to co-own the cow(s), they've been arrested and the milk destroyed.

If you want to drink only pasteurized milk, new laws will not prevent you from doing that. I fail to see how forcing the issue onto those who want raw milk, will harm anybody but the raw-milk drinkers. The food police have gone a bit too far on this one. I grew up drinking raw milk, and I'm fine.

It's all about personal choice. Maybe the food police don't know as much as they think they do.
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Old 02-23-2015, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Oceania
8,623 posts, read 6,208,150 times
Reputation: 8318
The school bus picks up/drops off all of the kids in the neighborhood at their driveways - there are no central bus stops any longer in the area.

Is raw milk as scary as school bus stops?

Why is it near impossible to find goat's milk in the DC area? Does the school bus theory apply as well?
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Old 02-23-2015, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Vermont
5,439 posts, read 14,726,249 times
Reputation: 2628
Raw milk is legal here in Vermont. The farmer has to sell it direct I believe - there are tiered restrictions based on amount of volume you sell. I have been drinking it for years and rarely get sick... if anything I attribute NOT getting sick to drinking the raw milk. Knock on wood
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Old 02-23-2015, 02:59 PM
 
269 posts, read 144,980 times
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I can't fathom why anyone should be able to put a gun to my head in order to control what I do or do not eat. It's also worth considering that the people who can afford to buy government regulations and fearmongering are the people who benefit from making raw milk illegal...

I switched to local raw milk about a year and a half ago and I love it. It is so much creamier, tastes better, and I believe the benefits far outweigh any risks, but that's my choice for me, and I do not presume to make choices for anyone else. All I ask is the same consideration in return.
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Old 02-23-2015, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Northern Maine
9,761 posts, read 14,870,264 times
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" I've seen raw milk from local producers here (I'm pretty sure) but I thought it was pasteurized."

Pasteurized milk is not raw milk. The pasteurizing process is a cooking process.

I worked in a dairy where the cows and the bottling plant were in the same building. People came to the dairy and bought raw, regular or homo. Raw milk was just that. It was chilled and not pasteurized. "Regular" was pasteurized and bottled, but the cream rose to the top. We poured the cream off the top for use on hot cereal and in coffee. "Homo" was homogenized. It is like the whole milk you buy today in the grocery store. Butterfat count depended on the species of cows in your herd. Jerseys and Guernseys had the highest butterfat count. Holsteins had the lowest, but gave the most milk.

(Not sure that all the words in this post will survive the filter.) Times change. The abbreviation for homogenized milk had no other connotations here back in the fifties.
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Old 02-23-2015, 06:01 PM
 
Location: South Seattle Suburbs
3,351 posts, read 5,935,782 times
Reputation: 3528
Quote:
Originally Posted by armory View Post
The school bus picks up/drops off all of the kids in the neighborhood at their driveways - there are no central bus stops any longer in the area.

Is raw milk as scary as school bus stops?

Why is it near impossible to find goat's milk in the DC area? Does the school bus theory apply as well?
What's this about centralized bus stops? I grew up in rural Michigan in the '70s and early '80s, and there was no such thing as a centralized bus stop. We all got picked up and dropped off at our driveways.

Not sure what correlation that has with raw milk, in any event. But I also don't understand the government hysteria over it. Somehow, people managed to consume milk long before pasteurization was invented. Maybe the nanny-state overreach with seatbelts and airbags would be a better analogy.
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Old 02-23-2015, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Back and Beyond
2,812 posts, read 2,707,352 times
Reputation: 6535
In Alaska, You can drink raw milk all you want provided it comes from your own cow or goat (I prefer goats milk). There are several places where you buy a share of a goat/cow on a farm. Then every month or whenever you come in you pay a husbandry fee of $6 for the cost of care taking your cow/ goat. Then you receive your gallon of milk.

There were a few different outbreaks a few years back on the kenai peninsula up here of multiple getting sick from consuming raw milk from such a cow share program. I'd have to really trust the farmer to do this. I'd want them to be very sanitary, take excellent care of the animals, pay close attention to sanitizing and hygiene and have it be on a small local scale, no money making ventures. I prefer to source my own from my own animals because of this, although I have no goats at the moment and therefore don't drink any milk right now.

Drink at your own risk.
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Old 02-23-2015, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,279,087 times
Reputation: 13779
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrian71 View Post
What's this about centralized bus stops? I grew up in rural Michigan in the '70s and early '80s, and there was no such thing as a centralized bus stop. We all got picked up and dropped off at our driveways.

Not sure what correlation that has with raw milk, in any event. But I also don't understand the government hysteria over it. Somehow, people managed to consume milk long before pasteurization was invented. Maybe the nanny-state overreach with seatbelts and airbags would be a better analogy.
Raw Milk
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