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Old 09-08-2015, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Vermont
5,439 posts, read 14,746,800 times
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In the short time I've had a Fujitsu mini split, I highly recommend it. I've got a RLS15 but you could do 2x9's and have 33 SEER. Mine is 25 SEER. Of course, 2 units (even smaller ones) costs almost double 1 unit.

Wall Mounted 9 - 15,000 BTU Hi SEER - Fujitsu Ductless Mini-Splits
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Old 09-08-2015, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
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Getting caught up with this thread. Thanks for all the great suggestions.


joe moving: How big is your house with the unit you have ?
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Old 09-09-2015, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Stay away from preconstruction tiny homes they will suck you into 60 k (a piece of garbage.) Build your own with even closets and a bedroom not a 4ft loft crawl in. Or check out deltec round or octagon homes ( green) living here in NC in one. Also Eagle Nest homes.
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by openmike View Post
Stay away from preconstruction tiny homes they will suck you into 60 k (a piece of garbage.) Build your own with even closets and a bedroom not a 4ft loft crawl in. Or check out deltec round or octagon homes ( green) living here in NC in one. Also Eagle Nest homes.
I saw those Deltec round homes but decided not to go with that.
No, I don't plan to get a prefab, stick built for me.
I found a site with small home plans (cottages) that I can have modified. Nothing fancy.
I don't want high ceilings or lofts.
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Old 09-10-2015, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Vermont
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyTexan View Post
Getting caught up with this thread. Thanks for all the great suggestions.


joe moving: How big is your house with the unit you have ?
It's 1800 sq ft, but it doesn't get all that hot here (maybe 90 with high humidity at most).

If you were building 1200 sq ft , with good insulation and sealing, I bet one 15kbtu unit would be fine (if you even need that much), but you can calculate all that with some software like HVAC-Calc at a later time.

for reference, my unit cost about $2800 installed, minus a $200 rebate i'm still waiting for.

Last edited by joe moving; 09-10-2015 at 05:36 PM..
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Old 09-13-2015, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 72,326,058 times
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I was just reading up on the washer/dryer combo units that are making inroads in the US.
They are popular in Europe and just now making their way into the US.
The dryer part is ventless but it takes longer to dry items which upsets some purchasers from the reviews.
None complained of the washer part and said it does an excellent job of cleaning clothes.

One unit instead of two would take up less space which is always good in a small home.
I tend to line dry outside whenever possible and don't make as much use of my dryer except in the coldest of winter and on rainy days when I've done laundry. Here in Texas that's just a few months out of the year.
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Old 09-14-2015, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Vermont
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We got the "Whirlpool hybridcare" we haven't had a chance to use it yet. IT got reasonable reviews so we decided to give it a try. It came with big rebates, too. $550 I think. I understand it's loud and takes a long time to dry... so we will see if that is acceptable to us.

It condenses and drains the liquid, rather than exhausts . Part of what I understand as a big benefit is that it doesn't exhaust several hundred CFM for 40 minutes or whatever, which in turns, sucks cold air into the house in the winter when you want it warm and the opposite in the summer when it's warm and humid out.

Last edited by joe moving; 09-14-2015 at 10:12 AM..
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Old 11-03-2015, 03:03 PM
 
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I will also advice against concrete foundation. Hardness on the feet aside, it is much harder to replace, fix, or add any piping you have later on that is usually in the crawlspace. Also, my parents has problem with humidity that seeps through the tile. Having a crawlspace with good circulation (which what they'd plan for the next house) seems much better.

Also look for radiant barrier in the attic, under the plywood. It is ideal to be installed during new house development. That should reduce the heat transfer to your house.
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Old 11-05-2015, 03:32 PM
 
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If you wind up with concrete, maybe look at Pex Tubing -- just looped through the concrete.

That allows warm water to circulate through the concrete, and warm the floor.

Put a system like that in a Greenhouse, about the size of house you are looking at in Glen Rose, Texas.

It uses two Solar Thermal collectors on the roof to warm water, which is stored in a Water Heater Tank (which never has to turn on), and then the warm water is circulated through the floor, and the warm floor heats the whole building -- with 10 to 12 foot ceilings.

It would hold the temperature in the building at 80 degrees F -- without any other heat, and all clouds for three days or more.

Some samples . . .

How to install PEX Tubing in a concrete slab

http://cement.org/tech/pdfs/PL971Radiant.pdf


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQxxWtRYicQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWa2onYt7BI
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Old 11-05-2015, 11:12 PM
 
39,218 posts, read 40,596,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lleello View Post
I will also advice against concrete foundation. Hardness on the feet aside, it is much harder to replace, fix, or add any piping you have later on that is usually in the crawlspace. Also, my parents has problem with humidity that seeps through the tile.
With modern construction you will typically have a moisture barrier between the stone and slab, once the slab dries which could be a very long time it should be good to go.
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