U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-15-2016, 12:38 PM
 
Location: DC
6,505 posts, read 6,424,922 times
Reputation: 3102

Advertisements

Cattle are fed corn. It takes over 100 gallons of water to grow a pound of corn. It takes about 6 pounds of corn to yield a pound of beef. So each pound of beef take about 600 gallons of water just to produce the feed. Much of that water comes fro underground aquifer and is not readily replenished.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-15-2016, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,676 posts, read 6,746,001 times
Reputation: 10232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Cleric View Post
Not necessarily. In many cases, the grass wouldn't be growing there unless irrigated. And, irrigating huge fields for cattle to graze on, plus the animals' drinking water requirements, takes more water than simply irrigating vegetables.

I believe that even the beef industry acknowledges this.
I have never heard of irrigating grassland for cattle. The cow farms around here certainly don't, nor do they irrigate the cornfields that are used for cattle feed.


Sure do read some strange [stuff] on C-D.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2016, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
17,739 posts, read 53,858,972 times
Reputation: 30005
Quote:
Originally Posted by DCforever View Post
Cattle are fed corn. It takes over 100 gallons of water to grow a pound of corn. It takes about 6 pounds of corn to yield a pound of beef. So each pound of beef take about 600 gallons of water just to produce the feed. Much of that water comes fro underground aquifer and is not readily replenished.
If you want to play water sports, according to this site: Interesting Water Facts - Oldham County Water District it takes 500 gallons of water to produce the wheat for a one pound loaf of bread.

It also states that while an acre of corn can evaporate 4,000 gallons per day, forty percent of water in the atmosphere falls out as precipitation within a day.

However, I don't necessarily trust those numbers, as they are a compilation from un-cited sources.

Now, to address something that is incredibly common in eco-nonsense - number creep. When an proponent searches for and cites a statistical number, it is incredibly common for the source not to be cited and the number rounded up or rounded down according to what appears more impressive to the uneducated.

A bushel of shelled corn is standardized at 56 lbs.
https://www.unc.edu/~rowlett/units/scales/bushels.html

"The research team, consisting of USDA researchers Tim Trout, Walter Bausch, Dale Shaner, and Lori Wiles, has discovered that it takes 2,500 gallons of water to produce 1 bushel of corn."
Yield per drop of water

2500 gallons divided by 56 pounds equates to less than 45 gallons of water "consumed" per pound of corn - less than HALF of the over 100 gallons claimed in the previous post.

Which am I to believe, a post by someone quoting unsourced and likely biased figures or the USDA? Decisions, decisions.

Again, the greater message is DON'T BELIEVE WHAT IS FED TO YOU BY PEOPLE WITH AGENDAS. Don't repeat nonsense like "Bill Gates wants to send you to Disneyland!" or other "facts" from unreliable sources. Be an adult.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2016, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Land of the Great Bears
3,432 posts, read 1,877,405 times
Reputation: 3682
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zymer View Post
I have never heard of irrigating grassland for cattle. The cow farms around here certainly don't, nor do they irrigate the cornfields that are used for cattle feed.


Sure do read some strange [stuff] on C-D.
Oh for Crissakes, then read it straight from beef producers themselves.

"..Another study by the University of California-Davis says it takes just 441 gallons of water to produce one pound of boneless beef. That’s about 110 gallons for a quarter-pound hamburger. This study takes into consideration the water used for an animal to drink, to irrigate pastureland that cattle graze on, to grow crops that cattle are fed and to process the beef.

Crop irrigation accounts for 95% of water use by the beef value chain, according to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.
In this impact category, a 3% reduction in use was achieved between 2005 and 2011.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-15-2016, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
17,739 posts, read 53,858,972 times
Reputation: 30005
Maine is a lot different climatologically than California is a lot different from north Alabama is a lot different than SE Alaska, so I'm not surprised someone from Maine is unfamiliar with California ag practices. Also, in the northeast, our family farm commonly grew corn for use as silage for the dairy cows over the winter, so it was easy to note a crop dedicated for a single purpose. Around here, dent corn is harvested by huge combines and goes to the co-op, where it can end up in any number of products or used as feed. Irrigation isn't common, but a few farmers have it for insurance if the August/September dry period is unrelieved. Last fall the problem was too MUCH rainfall delaying the drying of the crop in the field. No fields that I'm aware of are irrigated for grazing purposes around here. YMMV
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2016, 05:26 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,769 posts, read 1,033,780 times
Reputation: 5940
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Cleric View Post
Not necessarily. In many cases, the grass wouldn't be growing there unless irrigated. And, irrigating huge fields for cattle to graze on, plus the animals' drinking water requirements, takes more water than simply irrigating vegetables.

I believe that even the beef industry acknowledges this.
Nobody irrigates a pasture. You misunderstand "the beef industry."

There is a good deal of short grass prairie in the upper Plains and hilly, rocky, dry land in the SW that is unsuitable for row crops. That marginal land can still be used to raise cattle with minimal extra "inputs."

Drought: 10 things to know about California water use | 89.3 KPCC

Farmers in CA use ~40% of the state's water, and they don't grow much corn, beans or wheat there--it's for all those good fruits & veggies the vegetarians want.

I do agree we should be doing less farming in naturally dry areas. We're lowering those aquifers faster than they can be replenished. That's good because it is returning water that has been sequestered for eons to the general circulation. But it's bad because that ag production can only be maintained there, depending on the deep aquifers, for a finite time. Nature doesn't "need" the deep aquifers: they're sequestered and dong nothing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2016, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Land of the Great Bears
3,432 posts, read 1,877,405 times
Reputation: 3682
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Nobody irrigates a pasture. You misunderstand "the beef industry.".
Right. Me, UC Davis researchers, and Beef magazine. com to name a few. Maybe you should let them know too.

http://beefmagazine.com/blog/grazing...-irrigated-pa2.

What should I plant in irrigated pastures?

Bruce Anderson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension forage specialist, says, “Irrigated pastures can produce very high yields for high-quality grazing. But profits from these pastures don’t just happen. Good planning and high management is needed. Part of your success depends on planting the best adapted grasses. Plant at least three grasses in a mixture rather than a single species in irrigated pastures. No single plant is best adapted to all situations, so mixtures help maximize your pasture potential.”

Anderson recommends orchardgrass, smooth brome, meadow brome, creeping foxtail, tall fescue, festulolium, intermediate wheatgrass, perennial ryegrass, reed canarygrass, big bluestem, switchgrass, and indiangrass. Be sure to contact your local Extension office for recommendations on which grasses would work best in your area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2016, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Early America
1,696 posts, read 814,659 times
Reputation: 3735
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW View Post
The most efficient source of protein for people food is soybean Tofu.
A recent genetic discovery disputes your claim. Cornell researchers discovered a gene variation in people descended from vegetarian-based populations and marine-based populations. Vegetarian diets don't work for most people. This article explains the genetic reason for it.

Eating green could be in your genes | Cornell Chronicle

Aside from that and what has already been mentioned about the endocrine system, tofu is a processed product and much less ideal. Soybean crops are the most contaminated crops with pesticides, and genetically modified for those concerned about that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2016, 03:42 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,769 posts, read 1,033,780 times
Reputation: 5940
.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Cleric View Post
Right. Me, UC Davis researchers, and Beef magazine. com to name a few. Maybe you should let them know too.

http://beefmagazine.com/blog/grazing...-irrigated-pa2.

What should I plant in irrigated pastures?
.

That link doesn't give us the article. I have to wonder if the question was really "what IF I irrigated a pasture?" I have to doubt very many producers are actually doing it. It's unheard of here in the midwest.

The producer only makes about $200 profit on a head of cattle going to slaughter. That's the price of the last 75 lb put on the carcass. That's the extra 75 lb gained because the producer used estrogen ("growth hormone"), antibiotics and ractopine (a beta-agonist chemically related to albuterol, the asthma med). Those only add a cost of ~$10 per head. irrigation, I would suggest, would add much more expense than it's worth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-16-2016, 03:53 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,769 posts, read 1,033,780 times
Reputation: 5940
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimplySagacious View Post
There's also the example of lactase deficiency being less prevalent in the north European areas that depended heavily on dairy products in the diet.

Type II diabetes probably evolved as a benefit to those living in areas of food scarcity-- horsemen know the situation as "an easy keeper" among horses.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:36 PM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top