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Old 08-18-2016, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Denver
3,181 posts, read 2,620,552 times
Reputation: 2206

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Climate Changes in the United States : Image of the Day

If you look at observed trends, warming so far has been by and large great to the US, except to the southwest.

It may be that it has increased flood amounts of rainfall, but it appears hurricanes are down, so a wash.

Seriously, the poles are supposed to heat up much much faster than the equator. AGW probably won't effect tropical places much, but it'll bring huge changes to Siberia and Canada, which are WAY WAY bigger than people think. FYI the artic is not a bunch of rocks, so I don't know what the concern is there. That's only the canadian shield.
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Old 08-19-2016, 12:25 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,098 posts, read 6,507,733 times
Reputation: 13855
Quote:
Originally Posted by usagisan View Post

You sound like a alarmist to me. I actually started to write a serious response to your comments but then reread your post. Sufficient to say, you know very little about hydroponics nor agriculture science. Good day.
I've been a professional horticulturist for 50 years and do have a certain modicum of knowledge and experience with hydroponics, commercial greenhouse growing under lights and agricultural crops science as it's practised outdoors in the north in our colder Canadian climates and shorter growing periods.

I've also been observing the growing consequences of global climate change for the past 60 years, it's one of the several reasons I became a horticulturist and a farmer.

I'm sincere in my interest in reading your serious and knowledgeable response if you do have one. If you don't actually have one and don't wish to respond back, that's okay too, I understand. No worries.

You are right about one thing in calling me an alarmist. I am alarmed at the naivety and misunderstanding of so many people who truly believe that global warming will mean that there is going to be more food, more arable land, longer growing periods, more water, better temperatures for everyone and everything is going to be hunky dory.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 08-19-2016 at 12:47 AM..
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Old 08-19-2016, 03:53 AM
 
365 posts, read 393,560 times
Reputation: 751
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I've been a professional horticulturist for 50 years and do have a certain modicum of knowledge and experience with hydroponics, commercial greenhouse growing under lights and agricultural crops science as it's practised outdoors in the north in our colder Canadian climates and shorter growing periods.

I've also been observing the growing consequences of global climate change for the past 60 years, it's one of the several reasons I became a horticulturist and a farmer.

I'm sincere in my interest in reading your serious and knowledgeable response if you do have one. If you don't actually have one and don't wish to respond back, that's okay too, I understand. No worries.

You are right about one thing in calling me an alarmist. I am alarmed at the naivety and misunderstanding of so many people who truly believe that global warming will mean that there is going to be more food, more arable land, longer growing periods, more water, better temperatures for everyone and everything is going to be hunky dory.

.
It appear we are at a logical impasse. I think the idea of man made global warming is pure unadulterated B.S.

To your experience, among other business ventures, I own a hydroponic greenhouse operation and supply mostly greens, some fruits and various vegetables. You have about 20 years of growing experience on me however.

I reread your comments and we remain at odds on our understanding of hydroponics. People's experiences can differ and it appears we simply do.

Kindest regards...
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Old 08-19-2016, 11:43 AM
 
3,144 posts, read 3,068,724 times
Reputation: 3575
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
How will presently frozen land become arable as the climate warms? There is no arable soil there, it's all rocky desert, albeit frozen right now.

So when the rocky desert thaws out even if there is water available for irrigation how is rocky desert land going to become arable and productive?

You can't grow crop plants simply by putting water on warmed up rock. You can grow lichens on rock and that's about it. Lichens aren't edible. And they take decades to grow.

So how are we supposed to turn rock into fertile soil?

Land that is presently arable now is arable only because it is soil that was crushed, scraped up and deposited there by glaciers. When the glaciers receded they left the arable soil behind. Now much of that presently arable land that was left behind by glaciers is going to turn into desert dust, which means there will be less arable land altogether.

You are right, it certainly IS a question of reality.

.
Cows?
Maybe?

A couple of years ago hubby and I made a pilgrimage to the Keweenaw Peninsula above the Houghton bridge in the Upper Peninsula to see my grandfather's old family farm. A very nice older couple who's owned the place now for decades always welcome my family members when they dropped by.

The couple told us how they grew up in an area in Ohio where the soil was rich and loved growing things. The soil in the U.P. (at least at that time and in that particular area) was more challenging cause it was more glacial, but they said they lucked out because my grandfather had bought a bunch of cows to sell milk, and the cows ended up fertilizing the land so they could grow better crops. Maybe they knew a few tricks coming from Finland?

Of course this was a small scale solution to a small scale problem, but since I'm told we're at the point of no return, I'm hoping smart people will help with adaptation to whatever ever will happen.
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Old 08-20-2016, 06:37 AM
 
16,567 posts, read 14,008,327 times
Reputation: 20518
Quote:
Originally Posted by usagisan View Post
It appear we are at a logical impasse. I think the idea of man made global warming is pure unadulterated B.S.

To your experience, among other business ventures, I own a hydroponic greenhouse operation and supply mostly greens, some fruits and various vegetables. You have about 20 years of growing experience on me however.

I reread your comments and we remain at odds on our understanding of hydroponics. People's experiences can differ and it appears we simply do.

Kindest regards...
What is your degree in that gives you the scientific training to evaluate the science involved?
I am an oceanographer with graduate work in biology specializing evolutionary bio and ecology, I am well qualified to talk about the shifts in ranges and population genetics related to climate change. Additionally, I have done quite a bit of post doc work on ocean acidification through my students.

You mention hydroponics, so you must understand greenhouse effect. Do you disbelieve CO2 is a greenhouse gas? Do you not understand it is one of the chemical products of combustion? What exactly do you disbelieve about humans altering the chemical composition of the atmosphere?
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Old 08-20-2016, 07:20 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,098 posts, read 6,507,733 times
Reputation: 13855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Podo944 View Post
Cows?
Maybe?

A couple of years ago hubby and I made a pilgrimage to the Keweenaw Peninsula above the Houghton bridge in the Upper Peninsula to see my grandfather's old family farm. A very nice older couple who's owned the place now for decades always welcome my family members when they dropped by.

The couple told us how they grew up in an area in Ohio where the soil was rich and loved growing things. The soil in the U.P. (at least at that time and in that particular area) was more challenging cause it was more glacial, but they said they lucked out because my grandfather had bought a bunch of cows to sell milk, and the cows ended up fertilizing the land so they could grow better crops. Maybe they knew a few tricks coming from Finland?

Of course this was a small scale solution to a small scale problem, but since I'm told we're at the point of no return, I'm hoping smart people will help with adaptation to whatever ever will happen.


Kind of like how the herds of North American Bison fertilized the plains states and provinces, only that was on a massive scale going on for thousands of years. Those states and provinces became today's breadbaskets of the continent.

.
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Old 08-21-2016, 06:26 PM
 
12,264 posts, read 15,127,569 times
Reputation: 8066
Longer growing season meaning more food. Lower heating bills. Longer golf season. Fewer frostbite cases.
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Old 08-21-2016, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Portal to the Pacific
5,044 posts, read 5,043,027 times
Reputation: 6206
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
What is your degree in that gives you the scientific training to evaluate the science involved?
I am an oceanographer with graduate work in biology specializing evolutionary bio and ecology, I am well qualified to talk about the shifts in ranges and population genetics related to climate change. Additionally, I have done quite a bit of post doc work on ocean acidification through my students.

You mention hydroponics, so you must understand greenhouse effect. Do you disbelieve CO2 is a greenhouse gas? Do you not understand it is one of the chemical products of combustion? What exactly do you disbelieve about humans altering the chemical composition of the atmosphere?
Damn. Good response. Love to see it challenged.
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Old 08-21-2016, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Portal to the Pacific
5,044 posts, read 5,043,027 times
Reputation: 6206
What I think is ridiculous about this forum is that it's title "green living" and yet here are all these deniers coming in here bragging about how awesome it is to waste natural resources and endanger the lives of other humans and other organisms. If that's YOU then why don't you go get your own damn forum and leave those that DO live green alone.

So here is the next 80ish years. That's great some of you see some positivity to global warming... you're going to need a good dose of optimism.. personally, I have a lot to be excited for: I live in Seattle. Look at the projections for where I live in 2100. I already have paid-off real estate and I'm preparing to get some more. Not only does it appear that I'll be spared a lot of the weather-related physical discomfort most of the nation will experience, but my property value is going to sky rocket (it already kinda is.. I'm nearly a millionaire with what I own now!) as the rest of the country clamors to fit in the last bit of comfortable climate left in the country.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...ol-left-region

But keep going... let's hear more about your golf courses and lower heating bills...
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Old 08-22-2016, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Divided Tribes of America
13,539 posts, read 5,459,430 times
Reputation: 5294
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingsaucermom View Post
What I think is ridiculous about this forum is that it's title "green living" and yet here are all these deniers coming in here bragging about how awesome it is to waste natural resources and endanger the lives of other humans and other organisms. If that's YOU then why don't you go get your own damn forum and leave those that DO live green alone.

So here is the next 80ish years. That's great some of you see some positivity to global warming... you're going to need a good dose of optimism.. personally, I have a lot to be excited for: I live in Seattle. Look at the projections for where I live in 2100. I already have paid-off real estate and I'm preparing to get some more. Not only does it appear that I'll be spared a lot of the weather-related physical discomfort most of the nation will experience, but my property value is going to sky rocket (it already kinda is.. I'm nearly a millionaire with what I own now!) as the rest of the country clamors to fit in the last bit of comfortable climate left in the country.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...ol-left-region

But keep going... let's hear more about your golf courses and lower heating bills...
Looks like my $80k house in Elmira, NY will be worth some serious dough by 2100. The people living up in the surrounding hills will fare even better.
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