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Old 09-18-2016, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,867 posts, read 17,179,158 times
Reputation: 40698

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LudditeMan View Post
I'm a college student and I don't have my parents paying anything; I have less than 3k in debt right now and am on track to graduate with less than 5 figure debt and ideally none.. (2nd year)

Anyways the point was you live in an expensive area pretty much, and you only confirmed that. My current area isn't that cheap but there are still cheap places, but I aim to move somewhere even cheaper.. The way I have things planned I should be able to comfortably live on 10k so even if I make say 30k a year it wouldn't be an issue for me.

Now back on point; How do I plab to live on 10k?
This is what it all comes down to.. After an initial investment in land I would build a small cabin(should cost less than 20k, land and cabin that is) I can live without running water and electricity until I can afford to put in solar, and I would heat with wood..
I would charge my phone/laptop via vehicle or maybe get a small solar generator to keep them topped up

I would wash my clothes in a bucket with a wash board, and I would try and not buy food and just eat by hunting and growing

FYI I know what it would be like; Washing clothes in a bucket is laborious but cheap
And living without a.c isn't that bad

I could probably live on less than 10k at that price point!!

then again that hat is me, and I am ridiculously frugal and romanticize the 19th century a lot.. lol
I commend you for being able to get so much financial aid and scholarships and to have saved so much money to use for college expenses, plus work so hard to pay for all of your expenses.

Wow, to be able to graduate from college without any debt, or with less than $10,000 is pretty amazing for someone not getting any financial help from their parents or living at home. Just the tuition, fees & books at my kid's public colleges were over $10,000 a year & that did not count their living expenses, food and other needs. Of course, while my kids were frugal, they did not do things like wash their clothes in a bucket (except for hand washables) like you do to save money.
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Old 09-18-2016, 09:41 PM
 
125 posts, read 78,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
I commend you for being able to get so much financial aid and scholarships and to have saved so much money to use for college expenses, plus work so hard to pay for all of your expenses.

Wow, to be able to graduate from college without any debt, or with less than $10,000 is pretty amazing for someone not getting any financial help from their parents or living at home. Just the tuition, fees & books at my kid's public colleges were over $10,000 a year & that did not count their living expenses, food and other needs. Of course, while my kids were frugal, they did not do things like wash their clothes in a bucket (except for hand washables) like you do to save money.
It helps to start out at a community college, and then transfer
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Old 09-19-2016, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,624 posts, read 49,262,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LudditeMan View Post
You do you man; I wouldn't be caught dead in one em things!!! lol
So how does that define a liberal ?
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Old 09-19-2016, 07:59 AM
 
20,280 posts, read 16,451,303 times
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Can we not go political please? It is not the right forum.
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Old 09-19-2016, 08:23 AM
 
3,643 posts, read 1,835,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LudditeMan View Post
You must live in some super expensive place..
There are many places in the u.s where a home will cost less than 130k, and you can buy 20 acres for under 40 grand
I don't see how anyone making at least 30k a year can not afford that


The OP was from Washington State. After purchasing 2.5 acres in Eatonville, WA near Mt. Rainier, we finally sold the property.


Well installation is incredibly expensive;
Septic tank installation is beyond expensive;
Local County environmentalists want to do this study and that study and YOU pay for it;
You will NEVER ever win against thousand of blackberry vines;
Rural area where our land was was infested with rats, bugs, snakes, etc.:
Living in the "country" comes with living with meth-heads that watch your every move waiting for you to leave (well pump stolen during short absence);
This was not our first experience with purchasing land or building a house on rural property. How times have changed...!


I could go on and on, but to me it is simply NOT worth it. We bought the land for $37k at a bank auction, was a nice piece of land, but all the above made the actual cost prohibitive.


We were very, very luck to get rid of the land.
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Old 09-19-2016, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Wisconsin
16,867 posts, read 17,179,158 times
Reputation: 40698
Quote:
Originally Posted by LudditeMan View Post
I'm a college student and I don't have my parents paying anything; I have less than 3k in debt right now and am on track to graduate with less than 5 figure debt and ideally none.. (2nd year)
(snip)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LudditeMan View Post
It helps to start out at a community college, and then transfer
But, even if you start at a community college, you still have expenses for rent, utilities, food, the laundromat, internet, etc., etc.

Hmmm. or are you living at home and your parents are paying for all or most of those things? If that is the case then you really should not be saying that your parents aren't "paying anything".


Look at one tiny, tiny little thing such as washing your clothes. If you lived in a dorm or an apartment you probably would spend $10 a week on washing & drying two loads of laundry. If you live at home, even if you do your own laundry using your parents washing machine & dryer, their hot water, their electricity & their laundry detergent and dryer sheets your parents have contributed equivalent to $10 a week to supporting your college expenses. Over the course two years of community college that is at least $1,000 that your parents have contributed to your college education. Wow, $1,000 in just laundry expenses that you did not have to pay out of the money that you earn while working.

Now multiple that by 100 other little things and Voila! you can clearly see that your parents are paying to help you through college.

Now, if you are living in your own apartment and paying for all of those things yourself, then yes, you are doing it on your own.
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