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Old 03-22-2008, 10:10 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,101 posts, read 67,199,392 times
Reputation: 15753

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie1 View Post
I would love a Ford Escape....but the cost to buy is way too high, so I guess that I will stick with gas!
Quote:
Originally Posted by cleatis View Post
I would drive a hybrid. Only problem is that people like me won't be able to afford them for another 20 years, till then I'm stuck with these gas addicts I drive.
so I'm not looking too hard into what model I would drive, but I can say that someday, for sure, I will be driving one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry S View Post
I drive a Toyota Prius. Great mileage, though pricey to buy. The biggest problem I have with it is that the whole exterior is plastic and the slightest bump either creases it or removes the paint. Handles well in most weather. I would love to go with a plug-in, and would be very happy to see US manufacturers coming out with a good product.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I drive a 2003 Toyota Matrix and get about 35mpg. I drive about 200 miles a week, all work commute, no public options.
When I got the Matrix, a friend who was then married to a guy making big money bought an Insight. Loved the mileage, could hardly fit a briefcase into it. I am a single-person household, with multiple dogs and have to carry trash/recycling to the dump, so needed basically a hatchback wagon.
Friend said I should buy a hybrid, and I explained why it wouldn't work as a single car, plus, the purchase price was some $5k more than a similar-sized non-hybrid car. She said, "I wanted to support the technology." I resisted the urge to point out whose money was supporting the technology. If I spent $5k more than I had to, the difference would basically even up at around 8-9 years, given gas prices.
I did point out to her that, because both of us have chosen not to have children by choice, we are pretty earth-saving from the beginning.
I have failed to understand how electric cars that need electricity from the fuel-driven grid would represent a huge environmental improvement.
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
If I could afford one, I'd buy a Prius. I've always had Toyotas except for the last two cars which were Saturns and all got good mileage but I wish I could afford to do better for the environment and my own gas mileage.
I'm glad to hear on this thread that Saturn will be making a hybrid -- they make a good car.

p.s. I wish someone would ban SUVS, even a fuel efficient SUV. They are too big for the roads, they take up two parking places, they are hard to see around when you are stuck behind one in traffic, they have a high center of gravity so that they tend to roll over. Can't we get by with smaller cars?
Add me onto the list of folks who would LOVE to "go green" but simply can NOT afford to! I'm a struggling 21-year-old college student languishing with a 10-year-old sedan, and for the life of me I can't understand why the government isn't doing more to help subsidize peoples' purchases of hybrids during our current fuel crisis. Just think about the LONG-TERM BENEFITS such incentives could have for our economy. If the government made up the difference in cost between buying a typical vehicle and buying its hybrid counterpart, then one could conceivably use the savings to help stimulate the economy in other areas instead of paying the premium for the hybrids and then NOT being able to run out and buy something else to help ease our recession.

Is it because we have an oil-mongering idiot in office that the government will fund every Republican pork barrel project known to man but will NOT offer assistance to we low-income folks who wish to help our environment by purchasing a hybrid? I'd love a Prius, but who can afford one at my age unless "mommy and daddy" buys it for you? My parents only earn $80,000 annually and can't afford to buy me anything, so I struggle to work full-time whilst attending college full-time. Instead of being "rewarded" for my dillgence by the government with a $300 or $600 rebate check, I'm given $0 because I'm still claimed as a dependent! ARRGHHH!!! WILL I EVER BE ABLE TO AFFORD TO "GO GREEN??!!" I'm sorry to vent, but I'm just angry at feeling like a hypocrite because I tell everyone else to stop driving gas-guzzlers, yet I can't afford a fuel-efficient hybrid myself. $27,000 for a Prius? Pfah!
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Old 03-22-2008, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
10,732 posts, read 31,722,796 times
Reputation: 6773
I think finding a green way to get about instead of gasoline is a fabulous idea however after hearing what lengths they have to go to, to recycle the batteries from these cars, I don't think that is the answer.
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Old 03-23-2008, 10:45 AM
 
392 posts, read 1,708,963 times
Reputation: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWB View Post
WILL I EVER BE ABLE TO AFFORD TO "GO GREEN??!!"
Well really a great way to "go green" is not to use a car so NOT buying would make you very green.
A huge amount of fuel and raw materials are used to produce and ship new automobiles. That is before anyone buys or starts driving them.
[SIZE=2]As of 2003 according to the Environmental Defense Fund the North American automobile industry is responsible for the release or transfer each year of more than 300 million pounds (136,508 metric tons) of lead through mining, smelting, manufacturing, recycling and disposing of lead-containing automotive components -- primarily batteries - - and through normal vehicle use. That is before figuring in all the new batteries that are being used in hybrid vehicles.
So as for me I won't be buying a hybrid. I've made huge changes in my life to minimize my auto use. I'll stick with that.
[/SIZE]
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Old 03-23-2008, 10:56 AM
tao
 
Location: Colorado
720 posts, read 2,963,565 times
Reputation: 933
In 2005 we bought a Toyota Highlander, my first new car in 13 years (after getting directly hit by 2 hurricanes in the course of three weeks my car was finished). We only had $25000 to spend and we needed an SUV for the space (we realized we needed a bigger car/SUV after being unable to get plywood for our home to protect ourselves from the hurricanes) so we got a regular Hylander with no frills. We wished we could afford the hybrid version but we just couldn't.

I hope the prices will go down on hybrids - then I'm sure almost everyone would drive one.
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Old 03-24-2008, 04:00 PM
 
28,143 posts, read 39,753,662 times
Reputation: 36574
Quote:
Originally Posted by chuck22b View Post
Hopefully as more renewable electricity sources come on line, electricity will become more affordable. My idea with a plug-in hybrid, or full electric car, is that some day I'll also get solar shingles for my house. Then hopefully I can be more self sufficient as well as produce clean energy. Ideally :P

-chuck22b
There has been mention of adding solar panels to parking garages with receptacles for electrics. That would be smart!
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Durham, NC
2,536 posts, read 8,106,576 times
Reputation: 1623
We have an '06 Accord Hybrid. Would love to have waited for the Camry Hybrid to hit the market, but didn't have time. My wife simply did not like the Prius, so the Accord was it. Its not as efficient as other hybrids, but still gets great mileage, emits nothing at idle, and is screaming fast (faster than the V6 Audi A4 we traded for it). We're now in the market for a second car, but I'm not considering a hybrid. I think other good technology will enter the market soon, and don't want to be saddled with 2 hybrids that could quickly become yesterday's big thing. Also, the battery replacement issue looms, and I don't want that w/ 2 cars either. So our second car will likely be an efficient 4 cylinder that costs less up front.
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 23,218,153 times
Reputation: 10428
I bought an '08 Prius and love it. I also limit my driving by working from home 3 days per week, walk where I can, etc. Mine was about $21K, and I get a $2000 state tax credit. Although I haven't figured out how the tax credit works yet.
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Old 03-28-2008, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Just a few miles outside of St. Louis
1,921 posts, read 5,160,097 times
Reputation: 1185
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
p.s. I wish someone would ban SUVS, even a fuel efficient SUV. They are too big for the roads, they take up two parking places, they are hard to see around when you are stuck behind one in traffic, they have a high center of gravity so that they tend to roll over. Can't we get by with smaller cars?
Not everyone can get by with smaller cars, unless of course, we were all the size of the Munchkins from Oz! My husband is 6'8", my son is 6'4", and I'm 5'8", and there is no way that we are going to squeeze ourselves like sardines into a small car.

Frankly, I like our full-size truck, and Durango. Are they big? Yes, and I like it that way, because there's a little more between us, and the nitwits out on the road, many of whom are in those smaller cars, and who insist on doing all sorts of idiocy, putting others in danger, (yes, I know, there are nitwits in larger vehicles as well). I also like to sit up a little higher, because I can see better than I can in a car.

Do SUV's and trucks take up two parking spaces? Not unless they are parked that way on purpose, and it is no different than many smaller cars that I have seen being deliberately parked crossways, or half-way into both slots, taking up those two parking places, because someone was so worried that their car might get a scratch on it! I will admit that dualies are a little harder to fit into a parking slot, because of the wider wheel well, but most people I know, who own a dualie, are more likely to park it further out in a parking lot, anyway, so it generally won't be in the way of those who drive cars.

Hard to see around? Well, I can't argue with that one, but the same thing can be said of eighteen-wheelers, electric trucks, moving vans, travel trailers, motor homes, etc. It's just part of driving, and if someone is driving a tiny little car, they can pretty well expect not to be able to see around anything, whatever the size, except for possibly a motorcycle.

A high center of gravity? To a point, but if people would drive them correctly, and not treat them as though they were a low-riding race car, that wouldn't be a problem. It also helps not to jack them higher than the manufacturer intended. But, I would rather worry about the high center of gravity, than to worry about not being able to get over a pebble in the road because the little car is sitting so low to the ground. Not to mention the fact that I just don't like feeling as though my backside is dragging along the road! I also don't think it would be practical to haul hay for my horse in the back of a Prius, a Smart car, or any other car!

I'm all for doing what we each can for the environment, but we have to use common sense, and have some balance. Or, perhaps we could all just go back to the horse and buggy days! I'll bet that would go over like a lead balloon. Some folks don't like SUV's and trucks, and that is certainly their right not to drive them. But, those of us who do drive them have perfectly valid reasons for doing so. Calling for a ban on SUV's and trucks is not the correct solution.

When the automakers come up with sensible, and affordable SUV's and trucks, for average people, I'm sure most of us will be happy to use them. But, they must be able to do the jobs that we require of them, in order for them to be of any use to us, whether they are being used on ranches, going to construction sites, hauling hay for our horses, getting to the fishing hole, or being used by those who just simply feel safer in them. Let's not be punishing the regular folks in this country who both need to, and want to, drive larger vehicles.

Last edited by CelticLady1; 03-28-2008 at 10:45 PM..
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Old 03-28-2008, 11:40 PM
 
Location: Jax
8,204 posts, read 32,163,153 times
Reputation: 3392
Quote:
Originally Posted by CelticLady1 View Post
Not everyone can get by with smaller cars, unless of course, we were all the size of the Munchkins from Oz! My husband is 6'8", my son is 6'4", and I'm 5'8", and there is no way that we are going to squeeze ourselves like sardines into a small car.
I'm in the same situation as far as height, I'm just under 5'8" and my husband is 6', so there are some cars we simply don't fit into.

But I don't think it has to be an either/or choice, we can still make choices even if we need larger vehicles. We can choose a 6 cylinder instead of an 8, we can choose a mid-size instead of a full-size, and we can shop for the highest mileage we can find inside of those parameters.

I drive a Honda Pilot, and while I would love for it to be a hybrid, it's not, but it does get really good gas mileage for an SUV. That was an important deciding factor when I purchased it 4 years ago. I hope when it comes time to replace it that there will be a hybrid choice in that size (and no, the Highlander is not the same size - it is much smaller inside).
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Old 03-29-2008, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Just a few miles outside of St. Louis
1,921 posts, read 5,160,097 times
Reputation: 1185
Quote:
Originally Posted by riveree View Post
I'm in the same situation as far as height, I'm just under 5'8" and my husband is 6', so there are some cars we simply don't fit into.

But I don't think it has to be an either/or choice, we can still make choices even if we need larger vehicles. We can choose a 6 cylinder instead of an 8, we can choose a mid-size instead of a full-size, and we can shop for the highest mileage we can find inside of those parameters.

I drive a Honda Pilot, and while I would love for it to be a hybrid, it's not, but it does get really good gas mileage for an SUV. That was an important deciding factor when I purchased it 4 years ago. I hope when it comes time to replace it that there will be a hybrid choice in that size (and no, the Highlander is not the same size - it is much smaller inside).
I've had 6-cylinders in the past, and although they were fine, in and of themselves, I prefer the 8-cylinders. In fact, both of our vehicles are 8-cylinders, with a 360 engine. No, they don't get the best mileage, obviously, but we prefer the power under the hood, as opposed to the better mileage. It boils down to preference, and what works best for each of us. If one has a larger vehicle with a larger engine, the trade-off is that you don't get good gas mileage, but you do get a vehicle that fits better into one's lifestyle. For those who don't live as we do, and can make do, and/or prefer, the smaller vehicle, then that's the best choice for them. Mid-sized is fine for some folks, but again, we prefer large-size. They do a better job.


Those of us who drive larger vehicles don't do so just to annoy those in small vehicles, (laughing maniacally as we drive down the road), or because we don't care about the world in which we also live. We drive them because we want them, and need them, and because using smaller vehicles doesn't make sense for us. It's up to the automakers to create something that we can still sensibly use, that will be better for the environment, and that will be affordable for the average person, and I ardently hope they will, soon. But until then, we'll have to sacrifice the gas mileage in order to have vehicles that fit how we live.
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